Data from: Kin discrimination via odour in the cooperatively breeding banded mongoose

Jessica Mitchell, Solomon Kyabulima, Robert Businge, Michael A. Cant & Hazel J. Nichols
Kin discrimination is often beneficial for group-living animals as it aids in inbreeding avoidance and providing nepotistic help. In mammals, the use of olfactory cues in kin discrimination is widespread and may occur through learning the scents of individuals that are likely to be relatives, or by assessing genetic relatedness directly through assessing odour similarity (phenotype matching). We use scent presentations to investigate these possibilities in a wild population of the banded mongoose Mungos mungo,...
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