25 Works

Data from: Non-clonal coloniality: genetically chimeric colonies through fusion of sexually produced polyps in the hydrozoan Ectopleura larynx

E. Sally Chang, Maria E. Orive & Paulyn Cartwright
Hydrozoans typically develop colonies through asexual budding of polyps. Although colonies of Ectopleura are similar to other hydrozoans in that they consist of multiple polyps physically connected through continuous epithelia and shared gastrovascular cavity, Ectopleura larynx does not asexually bud polyps indeterminately. Instead, after an initial phase of limited budding in a young colony, E. larynx achieves its large colony size through the aggregation and fusion of sexually (non-clonally) produced polyps. The apparent chimerism within...

Data from: Age, state, environment and season dependence of senescence in body mass

Svenja B. Kroeger, Daniel T. Blumstein, Kenneth B. Armitage, Jane M. Reid, Julien G.A. Martin & Julien G. A. Martin
Data file in csv formatBMdata.csvRcode

Data from: Transient synchrony among populations of five foliage-feeding Lepidoptera

Maartje J. Klapwijk, Jonathan A. Walter, Aniko Hirka, György Csóka, Christer Björkman & Andrew M. Liebhold
1. Studies of transient population dynamics have largely focused on temporal changes in dynamical behavior, such as the transition between periods of stability and instability. The present study explores a related dynamic pattern, namely transient synchrony during a 49-year period among populations of five sympatric species of forest insects that share host tree resources. The long time-series allows a more comprehensive exploration of transient synchrony patterns than most previous studies. Considerable variation existed in the...

Data from: Ancient genomes revisit the ancestry of domestic and Przewalski’s horses

Charleen Gaunitz, Antoine Fages, Kristian Hanghøj, Anders Albrechtsen, Naveed Khan, Mikkel Schubert, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Ivy J. Owens, Sabine Felkel, Olivier Bignon-Lau, Peter De Barros Damgaard, Alissa Mittnik, Azadeh F. Mohaseb, Hossein Davoudi, Saleh Alquraishi, Ahmed H. Alfarhan, Khaled A. S. Al-Rasheid, Eric Crubézy, Norbert Benecke, Sandra Olsen, Dorcas Brown, David Anthony, Ken Massy, Vladimir Pitulko, Aleksei Kasparov … & Ludovic Orlando
The Eneolithic Botai culture of the Central Asian steppes provides the earliest archaeological evidence for horse husbandry, ~5500 years ago, but the exact nature of early horse domestication remains controversial. We generated 42 ancient-horse genomes, including 20 from Botai. Compared to 46 published ancient- and modern-horse genomes, our data indicate that Przewalski’s horses are the feral descendants of horses herded at Botai and not truly wild horses. All domestic horses dated from ~4000 years ago...

Data from: Temporal scale of environmental correlations affects ecological synchrony

Robert A. Desharnais, Daniel C. Reuman, Robert F. Costantino & Joel E. Cohen
Population densities of a species, measured in different locations are often correlated over time, a phenomenon referred to as synchrony. Synchrony results from dispersal of individuals among locations and spatially correlated environmental variation, among other causes. Synchrony is often measured by a correlation coefficient. However, synchrony can vary with timescale. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the timescale-specificity of environmental correlation affects the overall magnitude and timescale-specificity of synchrony, and that these effects are modified...

Data from: Mycorrhizal feedbacks generate positive frequency dependence accelerating grassland succession

Liz Koziol & James D. Bever
1. Plant mutualists including arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been postulated as being important drivers of plant community diversity and succession. Late successional plants have been shown to be more responsive to AM fungi and more sensitive to AM fungal species identity, which could generate positive feedback and potentially accelerate succession. 2. We test the effect of AM fungi on plant diversity and on frequency dependence predicted by positive plant‐AM fungi feedback across a successional...

Data from: Effects of removing woody cover on long‐term population dynamics of a rare annual plant (Agalinis auriculata): a study comparing remnant prairie and oldfield habitats

Helen M. Alexander, Cathy D. Collins, Aaron W. Reed, W. Dean Kettle, Daniel A. Collis, Lucy D. Christiana & Vaughn B. Salisbury
1. Worldwide, grasslands are becoming shrublands/forests. In North America, eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) often colonizes prairies. Habitat management can focus on woody removal, but we often lack long-term data on whether removal leads to population recovery of herbaceous plants without seeding. 2. We undertook a long-term study (17 years) of numbers of the rare annual plant Agalinis auriculata in a gridwork of 100 m2 plots in adjacent prairie and oldfield sites in Kansas, USA....

Data from: SNP-skimming: a fast approach to map loci generating quantitative variation in natural populations

Carrie A. Wessinger, John K. Kelly, Peng Jiang, Mark D. Rausher, Lena C. Hileman & Carolyn A. Wessinger
Genome-wide association mapping (GWAS) is a method to estimate the contribution of segregating genetic loci to trait variation. A major challenge for applying GWAS to non-model species has been generating dense genome-wide markers that satisfy the key requirement that marker data is error-free. Here we present an approach to map loci within natural populations using inexpensive shallow genome sequencing. This 'SNP skimming' approach involves two steps: an initial genome-wide scan to identify putative targets followed...

Data from: Drivers of vegetative dormancy across herbaceous perennial plant species

Richard P. Shefferson, Tiiu Kull, Michael J. Hutchings, Marc-André Selosse, Hans Jacquemyn, Kimberly M. Kellett, Eric S. Menges, Richard B. Primack, Juha Tuomi, Kirsi Alahuhta, Sonja Hurskainen, Helen M. Alexander, Derek S. Anderson, Rein Brys, Emilia Brzosko, Slavomir Dostálik, Katharine Gregg, Zdeněk Ipser, Anne Jäkäläniemi, Jana Jersáková, W. Dean Kettle, Melissa K. McCormick, Ana Mendoza, Michael T. Miller, Asbjørn Moen … & Dennis F. Whigham
Vegetative dormancy, that is the temporary absence of aboveground growth for ≥ 1 year, is paradoxical, because plants cannot photosynthesise or flower during dormant periods. We test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses for its widespread persistence. We show that dormancy has evolved numerous times. Most species displaying dormancy exhibit life‐history costs of sprouting, and of dormancy. Short‐lived and mycoheterotrophic species have higher proportions of dormant plants than long‐lived species and species with other nutritional modes. Foliage...

Data from: Relative importance of competition and plant-soil feedback, their synergy, context dependency and implications for coexistence

Ylva Lekberg, James D. Bever, Rebecca A. Bunn, Ray M. Callaway, Miranda M. Hart, Stephanie N. Kivlin, John Klironomos, Beau G. Larkin, John L. Maron, Kurt O. Reinhart, Michael Remke, Wim H. Van Der Putten & Ragan M. Callaway
Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition versus plant soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta-analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or singly, or comparing inter- vs. intraspecific competition) and PSF (comparing home vs. away soil, live vs. sterile soil, or control vs. fungicide-treated soil)...

Data from: Lineage space and the propensity of bacterial cells to undergo growth transitions

Arnab Bandyopadhyay, Huijing Wang & J. Christian J. Ray
The molecular makeup of the offspring of a dividing cell gradually becomes phenotypically decorrelated from the parent cell by noise and regulatory mechanisms that amplify phenotypic heterogeneity. Such regulatory mechanisms form networks that contain thresholds between phenotypes. Populations of cells can be poised near the threshold so that a subset of the population probabilistically undergoes the phenotypic transition. We sought to characterize the diversity of bacterial populations around a growth-modulating threshold via analysis of the...

Data from: Novel traits, flower symmetry, and transcriptional autoregulation: new hypotheses from bioinformatic and experimental data

Aniket Sengupta & Lena C. Hileman
A common feature in developmental networks is the autoregulation of transcription factors which, in turn, positively or negatively regulate additional genes critical for developmental patterning. When a transcription factor regulates its own expression by binding to cis-regulatory sites in its gene, the regulation is direct transcriptional autoregulation (DTA). Indirect transcriptional autoregulation (ITA) involves regulation by proteins expressed downstream of the target transcription factor. We review evidence for a hypothesized role of DTA in the evolution...

Data from: Phenotypic evolution shaped by current enzyme function in the bioluminescent courtship signals of sea fireflies

Nicholai M. Hensley, Emily A. Ellis, Gretchen A. Gerrish, Elizabeth Torres, John P. Frawley, Todd H. Oakley & Trevor J. Rivers
Mating behaviours are diverse and noteworthy, especially within species radiations where they may contribute to speciation. Studying how differences in mating behaviours arise between species can help us understand how diversity is generated at multiple biological levels. The bioluminescent courtship displays of cypridinid ostracods (or sea fireflies) are an excellent system for this since amazing variety evolves while using a conserved biochemical mechanism. We find that the evolution of one aspect in this behavioural phenotype...

Data from: The plant microbiome and native plant restoration: the example of native mycorrhizal fungi

Liz Koziol, Peggy A. Schultz, Geoffrey L. House, Jonathan T. Bauer, Elizabeth L. Middleton & James D. Bever
Ecological restoration efforts can increase the diversity and function of degraded areas. However, current restoration practices cannot typically re-establish the full diversity and species composition of remnant plant communities. We present evidence that restoration quality can be improved by reintroducing key organisms from the native plant microbiome. In particular, root symbionts called arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are critical in shaping grassland communities, but are sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance, which may pose a problem for grassland restoration....

Data from: The hatching mechanism of 130-million-year-old insects: an association of neonates, egg shells and egg bursters in Lebanese amber

Ricardo Pérez-De La Fuente, Michael S. Engel, Dany Azar & Enrique Peñalver
Hatching is a pivotal moment in the life of most animals. Diverse chemical, behavioural and mechanical methods have evolved in metazoans to break the egg membranes. Among them, many arthropod and vertebrate embryos hatch using ephemeral, frequently convergent structures known as egg bursters. However, the evolutionary processes by which hatching mechanisms and related embryonic structures became established in deep time are poorly understood due to a nearly complete absence from the fossil record. Herein we...

Data from: Relative selectivity of plant cardenolides for Na+/K+-ATPases from the monarch butterfly and non-resistant insects

Georg Petschenka, Colleen S. Fei, Juan J. Araya, Susanne Schröder, Barbara N. Timmermann & Anurag A. Agrawal
A major prediction of coevolutionary theory is that plants may target particular herbivores with secondary compounds that are selectively defensive. The highly specialized monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) copes well with cardiac glycosides (inhibitors of animal Na+/K+-ATPases) from its milkweed host plants, but selective inhibition of its Na+/K+-ATPase by different compounds has not been previously tested. We applied 17 cardiac glycosides to the D. plexippus-Na+/K+-ATPase and to the more susceptible Na+/K+-ATPases of two non-adapted insects (Euploea...

Data from: Cumulative reproductive costs on current reproduction in a wild polytocous mammal

Svenja B. Kroeger, Daniel T. Blumstein, Kenneth B. Armitage, Jane M. Reid, Julien G.A. Martin & Julien G. A. Martin
The cumulative cost of reproduction hypothesis predicts that reproductive costs accumulate over an individual’s reproductive lifespan. While short-term costs have been extensively explored, the prevalence of cumulative long-term costs and the circumstances under which such costs occur alongside or instead of short-term costs, are far from clear. Indeed, few studies have simultaneously tested for both short-term and cumulative long-term reproductive costs in natural populations. Even in mammals, comparatively little is known about cumulative effects of...

Data from: Origin and macroevolution of micro-moths on sunken Hawaiian islands

Chris A. Johns, Emmanuel F.A. Toussaint, Jesse W. Breinholt, Akito Y. Kawahara & Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint
The origins and evolution of Hawaiian biodiversity are a matter of controversy, and the mechanisms of lineage diversification for many organisms on this remote archipelago remain unclear. Here we focus on the poorly-known endemic leaf-mining moth genus Philodoria (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae), whose species feed on a diversity of Hawaiian plant lineages, many of which are critically endangered. We use anchored hybrid enrichment to assemble the first phylogenomic dataset (507 loci) for any Hawaiian animal taxon. To...

Data from: Demography or selection on linked cultural traits or genes? Investigating the driver of low mtDNA diversity in the sperm whale using complementary mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses

Phillip A. Morin, Andrew D. Foote, Charles Scott Baker, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kristin Kaschner, Bruce R. Mate, Sarah L. Mesnick, Victoria L. Pease, Patricia E. Rosel & Alana Alexander
Mitochondrial DNA has been heavily utilized in phylogeography studies for several decades. However, underlying patterns of demography and phylogeography may be misrepresented due to coalescence stochasticity, selection, variation in mutation rates, and cultural hitchhiking (linkage of genetic variation to culturally transmitted traits affecting fitness). Cultural hitchhiking has been suggested as an explanation for low genetic diversity in species with strong social structures, counteracting even high mobility, abundance and limited barriers to dispersal. One such species...

Data from: A phylogenetic taxonomy of the Cyrtodactylus peguensis group (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) with descriptions of two new species from Myanmar

L. Lee Grismer, , Matthew L. Murdoch, Perry L. Wood, Mark W. Herr, Rafe M. Brown, Evan S.H. Quah, Robert E. Espinoza & Marta S. Grismer
A phylogenetic taxonomy of species in the Cyrtodactylus peguensis group from the Ayeyarwady Basin of Myanmar is constructed based on color pattern, morphology, and molecular systematic analyses using the mitochondrial gene NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2. Newly collected samples from the type locality of C. peguensis and other localities indicate that this clade is endemic to central Myanmar and contains at least seven species, four of which are undescribed. Three species, including C. peguensis occur in...

Data from: An evaluation of transferability of ecological niche models

Huijie Qiao, Xiao Feng, Luis E. Escobar, A. Townsend Peterson, Jorge Soberon, Gengping Zhu & Monica Papeș
Ecological niche modeling (ENM) is used widely to study species’ geographic distributions. ENM applications frequently involve transferring models calibrated with environmental data from one region to other regions or times that may include novel environmental conditions. When novel conditions are present, transferability implies extrapolation, whereas, in absence of such conditions, transferability is an interpolation step only. We evaluated transferability of models produced using 11 ENM algorithms from the perspective of interpolation and extrapolation in a...

Data from: Natatanuran frogs used the Indian Plate to step-stone disperse and radiate across the Indian Ocean

Zhi-Yong Yuan, Bao-Lin Zhang, Christopher J. Raxworthy, David W. Weisrock, Paul M. Hime, Jie-Qiong Jin, Emily M. Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon, Sean D. Holland, Michelle L. Kortyna, Wei-Wei Zhou, Min-Sheng Peng, Jing Che & Elizabeth Prendini
Natatanura raw assembled sequencesNatatanura_seqs.zip

Data from: Extreme copy number variation at a tRNA ligase gene affecting phenology and fitness in yellow monkeyflowers

Thom Nelson, Patrick Monnahan, Mariah McIntosh, Kayli Anderson, Evan MacArthur-Waltz, Findley R. Finseth, John K. Kelly, Lila Fishman, Patrick J. Monnahan, Thomas C. Nelson & Mariah K. McIntosh
Copy number variation (CNV) is a major part of the genetic diversity segregating within populations, but remains poorly understood relative to single nucleotide variation. Here, we report on a tRNA ligase gene (RLG1a) exhibiting unprecedented, and fitness-relevant, CNV within an annual population of the yellow monkeyflower Mimulus guttatus. Variation at RLG1a was associated with multiple traits in pooled population resequencing (PoolSeq) scans of phenotypic and phenological cohorts. Five of 35 (14%) of resequenced inbred lines...

Data from: A fast-evolving X-linked duplicate of importin-α2 is overexpressed in sex-ratio drive in Drosophila neotestacea

Kathleen E. Pieper, Robert L. Unckless & Kelly A. Dyer
Selfish genetic elements that manipulate gametogenesis to achieve a transmission advantage are known as meiotic drivers. Sex-ratio X-chromosomes (SR) are meiotic drivers that prevent the maturation of Y-bearing sperm in male carriers to result in the production of mainly female progeny. The spread of an SR chromosome can affect host genetic diversity and genome evolution, and can even cause host extinction if it reaches sufficiently high prevalence. Meiotic drivers have evolved independently many times, though...

Data from: The influence of selection on MHC DQA and DQB haplotypes in the endemic New Zealand Hector’s and Māui dolphins

Dorothea Heimeier, Alana Alexander, Rebecca M. Hamner, Franz Pichler & C Scott Baker
Strong balancing selection on the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) can lead to different patterns in gene frequencies and neutral genomic variation within species. We investigated diversity and geographic structure of MHC genes DQA and DQB, as well as their inferred functional haplotypes, from two regional populations (East and West Coast) of the endangered Hector’s dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori hectori) and the critically endangered Māui dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui) (West Coast, North Island), and contrasted these results...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25

Affiliations

  • University of Kansas
    25
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    2
  • Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory
    2
  • University of Arizona
    2
  • American Museum of Natural History
    2