14 Works

Severe inbreeding depression is predicted by the “rare allele load” in Mimulus guttatus

Keely E. Brown & John K. Kelly
Most flowering plants are hermaphroditic and experience strong pressures to evolve self‐pollination (automatic selection, reproductive assurance). Inbreeding depression (ID) can oppose selection for selfing, but it remains unclear if ID is typically strong enough to maintain outcrossing. To measure the full cost of sustained inbreeding on fitness, and its genomic basis, we planted highly homozygous, fully genome‐sequenced inbred lines of yellow monkeyflower (Mimulus guttatus) in the field next to outbred plants from crosses between the...

Data from: Synchrony is more than its top-down and climatic parts: interacting Moran effects on phytoplankton in British seas

Lawrence William Sheppard, Emma J. Defriez, Philip Christopher Reid & Daniel C. Reuman
Large-scale spatial synchrony is ubiquitous in ecology. We examined 56 years of data representing chlorophyll density in 26 areas in British seas monitored by the Continuous Plankton Recorder survey. We used wavelet methods to disaggregate synchronous fluctuations by timescale and determine that drivers of synchrony include both biotic and abiotic variables. We tested these drivers for statistical significance by comparison with spatially synchronous surrogate data. We generated timescale-specific models, accounting for 61% of long-timescale (>...

Assessing seasonal demographic covariation to understand environmental-change impacts on a hibernating mammal

Maria Paniw, Dylan Childs, Kenneth Armitage, Daniel Blumstein, Julien Martin, Madan Oli & Arpat Ozgul
Natural populations are exposed to seasonal variation in environmental factors that simultaneously affect several demographic rates (survival, development, reproduction). The resulting covariation in these rates determines population dynamics, but accounting for its numerous biotic and abiotic drivers is a significant challenge. Here, we use a factor-analytic approach to capture partially unobserved drivers of seasonal population dynamics. We use 40 years of individual-based demography from yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventer) to fit and project population models that...

Data from: Helianthus maximiliani and species fine-scale spatial pattern affect diversity interactions in reconstructed tallgrass prairies

Thomas McKenna, Jack McDonnell, Kathryn Yurkonis & Caroline Brophy
1. Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function analyses aim to explain how individual species and their interactions affect ecosystem function. With this study we asked in what ways do species interact, are these interactions affected by species planting pattern, and are initial (planted) proportions or previous year (realized) proportions a better reference point for characterizing grassland diversity effects? 2. We addressed these questions with experimental communities compiled from a pool of 16 tallgrass prairie species. We planted...

Diversity in lac Operon Regulation among Diverse Escherichia coli Isolates Depends on the Broader Genetic Background but Is Not Explained by Genetic Relatedness

Tim Cooper, Kelly Phillips, Scott Widmann, Jennifer Nguyen, Christian Ray, Gabor Balazsi & Huei-Yi Lai
Transcription of bacterial genes is controlled by the coordinated action of cis- and trans-acting regulators. The activity and mode of action of these regulators can reflect different requirements for gene products in different environments. A well-studied example is the regulatory function that integrates the environmental availability of glucose and lactose to control the Escherichia coli lac operon. Most studies of lac operon regulation have focused on a few closely related strains. To determine the range...

Data from: On population abundance and niche structure

Luis Osorio-Olvera, Jorge Soberon & Manuel Falconi
Recent published evidence indicates a negative correlation between density of populations and the distance of their environments to a suitably defined ‘niche centroid’. This empirical observation lacks theoretical grounds. We provide a theoretical underpinning for the empirical relationship between population density and position in niche space, and use this framework to understand the circumstances under which the relationship will fail. We propose a metapopulation model for the area of distribution, as a system of ordinary...

Data from: Non-random latitudinal gradients in range size and niche breadth predicted by spatial patterns of climate

Erin E. Saupe, Corinne E. Myers, A. Townsend Peterson, Jorge Soberón, Joy Singarayer, Paul Valdes & Huijie Qiao
Aim. Tropical species are thought to experience and be adapted to narrow ranges of abiotic conditions. This idea has been invoked to explain a broad array of biological phenomena, including the latitudinal diversity gradient and differential rates of speciation and extinction. However, debate continues regarding the broad-scale applicability of this pattern and potential processes responsible. Here, we use a simulation approach to test two propositions: (1) strong geographic patterns of variation in realized niche breadth...

Extensive paraphyly in the typical owl family (Strigidae)

Jessie F Salter, Carl H Oliveros, Peter A Hosner, Joseph D Manthey, Mark B Robbins, Robert G Moyle, Robb T Brumfield & Brant C Faircloth
The typical owl family (Strigidae) comprises 194 species in 28 genera, 14 of which are monotypic. Relationships within and among genera in the typical owls have been challenging to discern because mitochondrial data have produced equivocal results and because many monotypic genera have been omitted from previous molecular analyses. Here, we collected and analyzed DNA sequences of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) from 43 species of typical owls to produce concatenated and multispecies coalescent-based phylogenetic hypotheses for...

Data from: Rates of niche and phenotype evolution lag behind diversification in a temperate radiation

Ryan A. Folk, Rebecca L. Stubbs, Mark E. Mort, Nico Cellinese, Julie M. Allen, Pamela S. Soltis, Douglas E. Soltis & Robert P. Guralnick
Environmental change can create opportunities for increased rates of lineage diversification, but continued species accumulation has been hypothesized to lead to slowdowns via competitive exclusion and niche partitioning. Such density-dependent models imply tight linkages between diversification and trait evolution, but there are plausible alternative models. Little is known about the association between diversification and key ecological and phenotypic traits at broad phylogenetic and spatial scales. Do trait evolutionary rates coincide with rates of diversification, are...

Data from: Phenology of Drosophila species across a temperate growing season and implications for behavior

J.M. Gleason, Paula R. Roy, Elizabeth R. Everman, Terry C. Gleason & Theodore J. Morgan
Drosophila community composition is complex in temperate regions with different abundance of flies and species across the growing season. Monitoring Drosophila populations provides insights into the phenology of both native and invasive species. Over a single growing season, we collected Drosophila at regular intervals and determined the number of individuals of the nine species we found in Kansas, USA. Species varied in their presence and abundance through the growing season with peak diversity occurring after...

Data from: Quantifying cryptic function loss during community disassembly

Akira Terui, Jacques Finlay, Amy Hansen & Jessica Kozarek
1. Emerging theory suggests that the ecosystem-level consequences of anthropogenic pressures depend on how species will be disassembled from ecological communities (i.e., the disassembly rule). Species loss, however, is not the sole ecological cause of ecosystem function loss: behaviors underpinning ecosystem function can also be disrupted by anthropogenic pressures without detectable declines of component species (“cryptic function loss”). 2. Here, we introduce a novel framework that integrates behavioral responses into community disassembly metrics. We applied...

Data from: The comparative biogeography of Philippine geckos challenges predictions from a paradigm of climate-driven vicariant diversification across an island archipelago

Jamie R Oaks, Cameron D. Siler & Rafe M. Brown
A primary goal of biogeography is to understand how large-scale environmental processes, like climate change, affect diversification. One often-invoked but seldom tested process is the so-called ''species-pump'' model, in which repeated bouts of co-speciation is driven by oscillating climate-induced habitat connectivity cycles. For example, over the past three million years, the landscape of the Philippine Islands has repeatedly coalesced and fragmented due to sea-level changes associated with the glacial cycles. This repeated climate-driven vicariance has...

Data from: Nectary size is a pollination syndrome trait in Penstemon

Lena C. Hileman, Carolyn A. Wessinger & Amanda M. Katzer
Evolution of complex phenotypes depends on the adaptive importance of individual traits, and the developmental changes required to modify traits. Floral syndromes are complex adaptations to pollinators that include color, nectar, and shape variation. Hummingbird-adapted flowers have evolved a remarkable number of times from bee-adapted ancestors in Penstemon, and previous work demonstrates that color over shape better distinguishes bee from hummingbird syndromes. Here we examined the relative importance of nectar volume and nectary development in...

Data from: Earth history and the passerine superradiation

Carl H. Oliveros, Daniel J. Field, Daniel T. Ksepka, F. Keith Barker, Alexandre Aleixo, Michael J. Andersen, Per Alström, Brett W. Benz, Edward L. Braun, Michael J. Braun, Gustavo A. Bravo, Robb T. Brumfield, R. Terry Chesser, Santiago Claramunt, Joel Cracraft, Andrés M. Cuervo, Elizabeth P. Derryberry, Travis C. Glenn, Michael G. Harvey, Peter A. Hosner, Leo Joseph, Rebecca T. Kimball, Andrew L. Mack, Colin M. Miskelly, A. Townsend Peterson … & Brant C. Faircloth
Avian diversification has been influenced by global climate change, plate tectonic movements, and mass extinction events. However, the impact of these factors on the diversification of the hyperdiverse perching birds (passerines) is unclear because family level relationships are unresolved and the timing of splitting events among lineages is uncertain. We analyzed DNA data from 4,060 nuclear loci and 137 passerine families using concatenation and coalescent approaches to infer a comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis that clarifies relationships...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Kansas
    14
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • Louisiana State University
    2
  • University of New Mexico
    2
  • University of Bath
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Royal Ontario Museum
    1
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    1