100 Works

Topsoil physico-chemical properties from the Glastir Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, Wales 2013-2016

D.A. Robinson, S. Astbury, G. Barrett, A. Burden, H. Carter, B.A. Emmett, A. Garbutt, C. Giampieri, J. Hall, P. Henrys, S. Hughes, A. Hunt, S. Jarvis, D.L. Jones, P. Keenan, I. Lebron, D. Nunez, A. Owen, M. Patel, M.G. Pereira, F. Seaton, K. Sharps, B. Tanna, N. Thompson, B. Williams … & C.M. Wood
This data set includes a range of physico-chemical properties measured from topsoil within a wide range of land use types across Wales, collected as part of the Glastir Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (GMEP). The properties included are: soil organic matter (loss on ignition (LOI)), derived carbon concentration, total soil organic carbon (SOC), nitrogen, total soil phosphorous, Olsen-phosphorous (within improved land only), pH, electrical conductivity, soil bulk density of fine earth, fine earth volumetric water content...

Conwy stream and estuary water quality data (2013-2016) [Turf2Surf]

D.M. Cooper, M.R. Marshall, S.K. Malham, J.L. Williamson, K. Spinney, J.B. Winterbourn, T.D. Peters, E.R. Howlett, P. Rajko-Nenow, M.G. Pereira, A.J. Lawler, P.O. Keenan, S.A. Thacker, S. Hughes & I. Lebron
The data comprise water quality measurements taken from streams and rivers in the Conwy catchment and its estuary from March 2013 to October 2016. Depending on water type and sampling location the data consist of concentrations of major cations and anions, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, suspended material and coliforms. Samples were collected manually or by automatic sampler. Analysis was carried out at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) Bangor, CEH Lancaster and Bangor University laboratories....

Tensiometer measurements from a field experiment in the Conwy valley, North Wales, UK (2013 - 2015)

M.R. Marshall, D.M. Cooper, H.C. Glanville & D. Jones
Data are presented of tensiometer measurements as centimetres of water from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment. The data were collected between October 2013 and January 2015 using tensiometers inserted into boreholes. The data were collected by trained members of staff from Bangor University and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The samples were taken to provide supporting information for assessing the relationship between soil microbial populations and soil moisture status. The data were...

Species richness in North Atlantic fish: process concealed by pattern

Henrik Gislason, Jeremy Collie, Brian R. MacKenzie, Anders Nielsen, Maria De Fatima Borges, Teresa Bottari, Corina Chavez, Andrey V. Dolgov, Jakov Dulčić, Daniel Duplisea, Heino O. Fock, Didier Gascuel, Luís Gil De Sola, Jan Geert Hiddink, Remment Ter Hofstede, Igor Isajlović, Jónas Páll Jonasson, Ole Jørgensen, Kristján Kristinsson, Gudrun Marteinsdottir, Hicham Masski, Sanja Matić-Skoko, Mark R. Payne, Melita Peharda, Jakup Reinert … & Lilja Stefansdottir
Aim Previous analyses of marine fish species richness based on presence-absence data have shown changes with latitude and average species size, but little is known about the underlying processes. To elucidate these processes we use metabolic, neutral, and descriptive statistical models to analyse how richness responds to maximum species length, fish abundance, temperature, primary production, depth, latitude, and longitude, while accounting for differences in species catchability, sampling effort, and mesh size. Data Results from 53,382...

Soil hydraulic property data from the Climoor fieldsite in the Clocaenog Forest (2010-2012) v2

D.A. Robinson, I. Lebron, A.R. Smith, M.R. Marshall, B.A. Emmett, S. Reinsch, D.M. Cooper & M.R. Brooks
This dataset contains soil hydraulic measurement data from the Climoor field site in the Clocaenog forest, in North Wales. The collection contains five data sets. 1) soil bulk density (0-5 centimetre) and saturated water content. 2) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured in the field at tensions of -2 and -6 centimetre using a mini disk infiltrometer. 3) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured using a HYPROP (registered trademark) instrument, an instrument which determines the hydraulic properties of soil...

Soil hydraulic property data from the Climoor fieldsite in the Clocaenog Forest (2010-2012)

D.A. Robinson, I. Lebron, A.R. Smith, M.R. Marshall, B.A. Emmett, S. Reinsch, D.M. Cooper & M.R. Brooks
This dataset contains soil hydraulic measurement data from the Climoor field site in the Clocaenog forest, in North Wales. The collection contains five data sets. 1) soil bulk density (0-5 centimetre) and saturated water content. 2) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured in the field at tensions of -2 and -6 centimetre using a mini disk infiltrometer. 3) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured using a HYPROP (registered trademark) instrument, an instrument which determines the hydraulic properties of soil...

Data from: Species interactions and environmental context affect intraspecific behavioural trait variation and ecosystem function

Camilla Cassidy, Laura J Grange, Clement Garcia, Stefan Bolam & Jasmin A Godbold
Functional trait-based approaches are increasingly adopted to understand and project ecological responses to environmental change; however, most assume trait expression is constant between conspecifics irrespective of con- text. Using two species of benthic invertebrate (brittlestars Amphiura filiformis and A. chiajei), we demonstrate that trait expression at individual and com- munity levels differs with biotic and abiotic context. We use PERMANOVA to test the effect of species identity, density and local environmental history on individual (righting...

Calcareous defense structures of prey mediate the effects of predation and biotic resistance towards the tropics

Gustavo M Dias, Edson A Vieira, Lueji Pestana, Antonio C Marques, Simon Karythis, Stuart R Jenkins & Katherine Griffith
Aims The importance of biotic interactions in creating and maintaining diversity is expected to increase toward low latitudes. However, the way in which predation affects diversity, can depend on how predators mediate competitive interactions and also on defensive traits of prey. Here we assessed the role of physical defences of prey to escape predation and how the importance of predation on community structure and diversity changes across latitude. Location Six sites, in three regions distributed...

Using vertebrate environmental DNA from seawater in biomonitoring of marine habitats

Eva Egelyng Sigsgaard, Felipe Torquato, Tobias Guldberg Frøslev, Alec B. M. Moore, Johan Mølgård Sørensen, Pedro Range, Radhouane Ben Hamadou, Steffen Sanvig Bach, Peter Rask Møller & Philip Francis Thomsen
Conservation and management of marine biodiversity depends on biomonitoring of marine habitats, but current approaches are resource-intensive and require different approaches for different organisms. Environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from water samples is an efficient and versatile approach to detecting aquatic animals. In the ocean, eDNA composition reflects local fauna at fine spatial scales, but little is known about the effectiveness of eDNA-based monitoring of marine communities at larger scales. We investigated the potential of eDNA...

Rapid and predictable evolution of admixed populations between two Drosophila species pairs

Daniel Matute, Aaron Comeault, Eric Earley, Antonio Serrato-Capuchina, David Peede, Anaïs Monroy-Eklund, Wen Huang, Corbin Jones, Trudy Mackay & Jerry Coyne
The consequences of hybridization are varied, ranging from the origin of new lineages, introgression of some genes between species, to the extinction of one of the hybridizing species. We generated replicate admixed populations between two pairs of sister species of Drosophila: D. simulans and D. mauritiana; and D. yakuba and D. santomea. Each pair consisted of a continental species and an island endemic. The admixed populations were maintained by random mating in discrete generations for...

Data from: Vocal characteristics of prairie dog alarm calls across an urban noise gradient

Graeme Shannon, Megan F. McKenna, Grete Wilson-Henjum, Lisa M. Angeloni, Kevin R. Crooks & George Wittemyer
Increasing anthropogenic noise is having a global impact on wildlife, particularly due to the masking of crucial acoustical communication. However, there have been few studies examining the impacts of noise exposure on communication in free-ranging terrestrial mammals. We studied alarm calls of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) across an urban gradient to explore vocal adjustment relative to different levels of noise exposure. There was no change in the frequency 5%, peak frequency or duration of...

Data from: Distribution maps of cetacean and seabird populations in the North-East Atlantic

James Waggitt
1. Distribution maps of cetaceans and seabirds at basin and monthly scales are needed for conservation and marine management. These are usually created from standardised and systematic aerial and vessel surveys, with recorded animal densities interpolated across study areas. However, as individual surveys have restricted spatial and temporal coverage, distribution maps at basin and monthly scales have previously not been possible. 2. This study develops an alternative approach consisting of: (1) collating diverse survey data...

Data from: Widespread parallel population adaptation to climate variation across a radiation: implications for adaptation to climate change.

Roger S. Thorpe, Axel Barlow, Anita Malhotra & Yann Surget-Groba
Global warming will impact species in a number of ways, and it is important to know the extent to which natural populations can adapt to anthropogenic climate change by natural selection. Parallel microevolution within separate species can demonstrate natural selection, but several studies of homoplasy have not yet revealed examples of widespread parallel evolution in a generic radiation. Taking into account primary phylogeographic divisions, we investigate numerous quantitative traits (size, shape, scalation, colour pattern and...

Data from: Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius)

Ilaria Milano, Massimiliano Babbucci, Alessia Cariani, Miroslava Atanassova, Dorte Bekkevold, Gary R. Carvalho, Montserrat Espiñeira, Fabio Fiorentino, Germana Garofalo, Audrey J. Geffen, Einar E. Nielsen, Rob Ogden, Tomaso Patarnello, Marco Stagioni, Fausto Tinti & Luca Bargelloni
Shallow population structure is generally reported for most marine fish and explained as a consequence of high dispersal, connectivity and large population size. Targeted gene analyses and more recently genome-wide studies have challenged such view, suggesting that adaptive divergence might occur even when neutral markers provide genetic homogeneity across populations. Here, 381 SNPs located in transcribed regions were used to assess large- and fine-scale population structure in the European hake (Merluccius merluccius), a widely distributed...

Data from: A genomic island linked to ecotype divergence in Atlantic cod

Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Einar E. Nielsen, Nina O. Therkildsen, Martin I. Taylor, Rob Ogden, Audrey J. Geffen, Dorte Bekkevold, Sarah Helyar, Christophe Pampoulie, Torild Johansen & Gary R. Carvalho
The genomic architecture underlying ecological divergence and ecological speciation with gene flow is still largely unknown for most organisms. One central question is whether divergence is genome-wide or localized in “genomic mosaics” during early stages when gene flow is still pronounced. Empirical work has so far been limited, and the relative impacts of gene flow and natural selection on genomic patterns have not been fully explored. Here, we use ecotypes of Atlantic cod to investigate...

Data from: Transcriptomics and in vivo tests reveal novel mechanisms underlying endocrine disruption in an ecological sentinel, Nucella lapillus

Sonia Pascoal, Gary Carvalho, Olga Vasieva, Roger Hughes, Andrew Cossins, Yongxiang Fang, Kevin Ashelford, Lisa Olohan, Carlos Barroso, Sonia Mendo & Simon Creer
Anthropogenic endocrine disruptors now contaminate all environments globally, with concomitant deleterious effects across diverse taxa. While most studies on endocrine disruption (ED) have focused on vertebrates, the superimposition of male sexual characteristics in the female dogwhelk, Nucella lapillus (imposex), caused by organotins, provides one of the most clearcut ecological examples of anthropogenically induced ED in aquatic ecosystems. To identify the underpinning mechanisms of imposex for this ‘nonmodel’ species, we combined Roche 454 pyrosequencing with custom...

Data from: Scale‐dependent spatial patterns in benthic communities around a tropical island seascape

Eoghan A. Aston, Gareth J. Williams, J. A. Mattias Green, Andrew J. Davies, Lisa M. Wedding, Jamison M. Gove, Jean-Baptiste Jouffray, Timothy T. Jones & Jeanette Clark
Understanding and predicting patterns of spatial organization across ecological communities is central to the field of landscape ecology, and a similar line of inquiry has begun to evolve sub‐tidally among seascape ecologists. Much of our current understanding of the processes driving marine community patterns, particularly in the tropics, has come from small‐scale, spatially‐discrete data that are often not representative of the broader seascape. Here we expand the spatial extent of seascape ecology studies and combine...

Data from: Assessing bottom-trawling impacts based on the longevity of benthic invertebrates

Jan Geert Hiddink, Simon Jennings, Marija Sciberras, Stefan Bolam, Giulia Cambie, Robert McConnaughey, Tessa Mazor, Ray Hilborn, Jeremy Collie, C. Roland Pitcher, Ana Parma, Petri Suuronen, Michel Kaiser, Adriaan Rijnsdorp, Jeremy S. Collie, Michel J. Kaiser, Adriaan D. Rijnsdorp & Robert A. McConnaughey
1. Bottom trawling is the most widespread human activity directly affecting seabed habitats. Assessment and effective management of the effects of bottom trawling at the scale of fisheries requires an understanding of differences in sensitivity of biota to trawling. Responses to disturbance are expected to depend on the intrinsic rate of increase of populations (r), which is expected to be linearly related to the reciprocal of longevity. 2. We examine the relationship between the longevity...

Data from: Fencing solves human‐wildlife conflict locally but shifts problems elsewhere: a case study using functional connectivity modelling of the African elephant

Liudmila Osipova, Moses M. Okello, Steven J. Njumbi, Shadrack Ngene, David Western, Matt W. Hayward & Niko Balkenhol
1. Fencing is one of the commonest methods for mitigating human-wildlife conflicts. At the same time, fencing is considered to be of one of the most pressing emerging threats to conservation globally. Although fences act as barriers and eventually can cause population isolation and fragmentation, it is challenging to quantitatively predict the possible consequences fences have for wildlife. 2. Here, we model how fencing designed to mitigate human-elephant conflict (HEC) on the Borderlands between Kenya...

Data from: A global database and ‘state of the field’ review of research into ecosystem engineering by land animals.

Nicole V. Coggan, Matthew W. Hayward & Heloise Gibb
1. Ecosystem engineers have been widely studied for terrestrial systems, but global trends in research encompassing the range of taxa and functions have not previously been synthesised. 2. We synthesised contemporary understanding of engineer fauna in terrestrial habitats and assessed the methods used to document patterns and processes, asking: 1.Which species act as ecosystem engineers and with whom do they interact? 2. What are the impacts of ecosystem engineers in terrestrial habitats and how are...

Data from: Evolutionary and structural analyses uncover a role for solvent interactions in the diversification of cocoonases in butterflies

Gilbert Smith, John E. Kelly, Aide Macias-Muñoz, Carter T. Butts, Rachel W. Martin & Adriana D. Briscoe
Multi-omic approaches promise to supply the power to detect genes underlying disease and fitness-related phenotypes. Optimal use of the resulting profusion of data requires detailed investigation of individual candidate genes, a challenging proposition. Here, we combine transcriptomic and genomic data with molecular modeling of candidate enzymes to characterize the evolutionary history and function of the serine protease cocoonase. Heliconius butterflies possess the unique ability to feed on pollen; recent work has identified cocoonase as a...

Data from: Rapid assessment of forest canopy and light regime using smartphone hemispherical photography

Simone Bianchi, Christine Cahalan, Sophie Hale & James Michael Gibbons
Hemispherical photography (HP), implemented with cameras equipped with “fisheye” lenses, is a widely used method for describing forest canopies and light regimes. A promising technological advance is the availability of low-cost fisheye lenses for smartphone cameras. However, smartphone camera sensors cannot record a full hemisphere. We investigate whether smartphone HP is a cheaper and faster but still adequate operational alternative to traditional cameras for describing forest canopies and light regimes. We collected hemispherical pictures with...

Data from: Impacts of logging roads on tropical forests

Fritz Kleinschroth & John R. Healey
Road networks are expanding in tropical countries, increasing human access to remote forests that act as refuges for biodiversity and provide globally important ecosystem services. Logging is one of the main drivers of road construction in tropical forests. We evaluated forest fragmentation and impacts of logging roads on forest resilience and wildlife, considering the full life cycle of logging roads. Through an extensive evidence review we found that for logging road construction, corridors between 3...

Data from: The genetics of mate preferences in hybrids between two young and sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid species

Ola Svensson, Katie Woodhouse, Cock Van Oosterhout, Alan Smith, George F. Turner & Ole Seehausen
The genetic architecture of mate preferences is likely to affect significant evolutionary processes, including speciation and hybridization. Here, we investigate laboratory hybrids between a pair of sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid fish species that appear to have recently evolved from a hybrid population between similar predecessor species. The species demonstrate strong assortative mating in the laboratory, associated with divergent male breeding coloration (red dorsum versus blue). We show in a common garden experiment, using DNA-based paternity...

Data from: Genomic imprinting, disrupted placental expression, and speciation

Thomas David Brekke, Lindy A. Henry, Jeffrey M. Good & Thomas D. Brekke
The importance of regulatory incompatibilities to the early stages of speciation remains unclear. Hybrid mammals often show extreme parent-of-origin growth effects that are thought to be a consequence of disrupted genetic imprinting (parent-specific epigenetic gene silencing) during early development. Here we test the long-standing hypothesis that abnormal hybrid growth reflects disrupted gene expression due to loss of imprinting (LOI) in hybrid placentas, resulting in dosage imbalances between paternal growth factors and maternal growth repressors. We...

Registration Year

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    3
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    20
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    24
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    15
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
    100

Affiliations

  • Bangor University
    100
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    42
  • University of East Anglia
    5
  • Rothamsted Research
    4
  • University of Copenhagen
    4
  • Technical University of Denmark
    4
  • University of Jaén
    3
  • University of Rhode Island
    3
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Spanish Institute of Oceanography
    2
  • University of Iceland
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • University of Nottingham
    2