30 Works

Soil physical, chemical and microbial properties from a field experiment in the Conwy Valley, North Wales, UK (2015)

D.M. Cooper, L.L. De Sosa, H.C. Glanville & M.R. Marshall
General soil chemical, physical and microbial properties are presented for soil samples at six depths collected from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment. Samples were collected in May 2015. Core samples were taken along three transects by trained members of staff the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and Bangor University. General soil chemical, physical and microbial properties were measured at six depths by trained members of staff, using recognised procedures at the laboratories of...

Data from: Scale‐dependent spatial patterns in benthic communities around a tropical island seascape

Eoghan A. Aston, Gareth J. Williams, J. A. Mattias Green, Andrew J. Davies, Lisa M. Wedding, Jamison M. Gove, Jean-Baptiste Jouffray, Timothy T. Jones & Jeanette Clark
Understanding and predicting patterns of spatial organization across ecological communities is central to the field of landscape ecology, and a similar line of inquiry has begun to evolve sub‐tidally among seascape ecologists. Much of our current understanding of the processes driving marine community patterns, particularly in the tropics, has come from small‐scale, spatially‐discrete data that are often not representative of the broader seascape. Here we expand the spatial extent of seascape ecology studies and combine...

Data from: Artificial light at night causes top-down and bottom-up trophic effects on invertebrate populations

Jonathan Bennie, Thomas W. Davies, David Cruse, Richard Inger & Kevin J. Gaston
1. Globally, many ecosystems are exposed to artificial light at night. Nighttime lighting has direct biological impacts on species at all trophic levels. However, the effects of artificial light on biotic interactions largely remain to be determined. 2. We exposed experimental mesocosms containing combinations of grassland plants and invertebrate herbivores and predators to illumination at night over a three-year period to simulate conditions under different common forms of street lighting. 3. We demonstrate both top-down...

Data from: The influence of environmental gradients on individual behaviour: individual plasticity is consistent across risk and temperature gradients

Tomas O. Cornwell, Ian D. McCarthy, C. Richard A. Snyder & Peter A. Biro
1. The expression of individual behaviour as a function of environmental variation (behavioural plasticity) is recognised as a means for animals to modify their phenotypes in response to changing conditions. Plasticity has been studied extensively in recent years, leading to an accumulation of evidence for behavioural plasticity within natural populations. 2. Despite the recent attention given to studying individual variation in behavioural plasticity, there is still a lack of consensus regarding its causes and constraints....

Data from: Host‐derived population genomics data provides insights into bacterial and diatom composition of the killer whale skin

Rebecca Hooper, Jaelle C. Brealey, Tom Van Der Valk, Antton Alberdi, John W. Durban, Holly Fearnbach, Kelly M. Robertson, Robin W. Baird, M. Bradley Hanson, Paul Wade, M Thomas P. Gilbert, Philip A. Morin, Jochen B.W. Wolf, Andrew D. Foote, Katerina Guschanski, Phillip A. Morin, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, M. Bradley Hanson & Jochen B. W. Wolf
Recent exploration into the interactions and relationship between hosts and their microbiota has revealed a connection between many aspects of the host's biology, health and associated micro‐organisms. Whereas amplicon sequencing has traditionally been used to characterize the microbiome, the increasing number of published population genomics data sets offers an underexploited opportunity to study microbial profiles from the host shotgun sequencing data. Here, we use sequence data originally generated from killer whale Orcinus orca skin biopsies...

Data from: Experimental evidence that female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) perceive variation in male facial masculinity

Kevin A. Rosenfield, Stuart Semple, Alexander V. Georgiev, Dario Maestripieri, James P. Higham & Constance Dubuc
Among many primate species, face shape is sexually dimorphic, and male facial masculinity has been proposed to influence female mate choice and male-male competition. However, whether conspecifics pay attention to facial masculinity has only been assessed in humans. Here, working with free-ranging rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta, we used a two-alternative look-time experiment to test whether females perceive male facial masculinity. We presented 107 females with pairs of images of male faces – one more masculine...

Data from: Whole genome duplication and transposable element proliferation drive genome expansion in Corydoradinae catfishes

Sarah Marburger, Markos A. Alexandrou, John B. Taggart, Simon Creer, Gary Carvalho, Claudio Oliveira & Martin I. Taylor
Genome size varies significantly across eukaryotic taxa and the largest changes are typically driven by macro-mutations such as whole genome duplications (WGDs) and proliferation of repetitive elements. These two processes may affect the evolutionary potential of lineages by increasing genetic variation and changing gene expression. Here we elucidate the evolutionary history and mechanisms underpinning genome size variation in a species rich group of Neotropical catfishes (Corydoradinae) with extreme variation in genome size - 0.6pg to...

Data from: Combined measurements of prey availability explain habitat selection in foraging seabirds

James J. Waggitt, Pierre W. Cazenave, Leigh M. Howarth, Peter G.H. Evans, Jeroen Van Der Kooij & Jan G. Hiddink
Understanding links between habitat characteristics and foraging efficiency help to predict how environmental change could influence populations of top-predators. This study examines whether measurements of prey (clupeids) availability varied over stratification gradients, and determined if any of those measurements coincided with aggregations of foraging seabirds (common guillemot Uria aalge, Manx shearwater Puffinus puffinus) in the Celtic Sea, UK. The probability of encountering foraging seabirds was highest around fronts between mixed and stratified water. Prey were...

Data from: Demography or selection on linked cultural traits or genes? Investigating the driver of low mtDNA diversity in the sperm whale using complementary mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses

Phillip A. Morin, Andrew D. Foote, C. Scott Baker, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kristin Kaschner, Bruce R. Mate, Sarah L. Mesnick, Victoria L. Pease, Patricia E. Rosel, Alana Alexander & Charles Scott Baker
Mitochondrial DNA has been heavily utilized in phylogeography studies for several decades. However, underlying patterns of demography and phylogeography may be misrepresented due to coalescence stochasticity, selection, variation in mutation rates, and cultural hitchhiking (linkage of genetic variation to culturally transmitted traits affecting fitness). Cultural hitchhiking has been suggested as an explanation for low genetic diversity in species with strong social structures, counteracting even high mobility, abundance and limited barriers to dispersal. One such species...

Time series of microbial carbon release from soil as carbon dioxide under different nitrogen and phosphorus treatments with a high glucose concentration added as a carbon source in the Conwy catchment, North Wales, UK (2016)

H.C. Glanville, L.L. De Sosa, M.R. Marshall, D.M. Cooper & D.L. Jones
Time series data of carbon release in disintegrations per minute are presented for different nitrogen and phosphorus treatments with a high glucose concentration substrate added as a carbon source to soil samples from six depths (0-15, 15-30, 50-100, 100-150, 150-200 and 250-300 centimetres). Soil cores were collected from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment in July 2016 and returned the laboratories of the School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University. A high...

Enteric virus concentrations and chemical properties of wastewater, water, sediment and shellfish samples collected along the Conwy River and estuary, North Wales (2016-2017)

K. Farkas, D.M. Cooper, J.E. McDonald, S.K. Malham & D.L. Jones
This dataset contains pH, turbidity, conductivity and viral concentration information in river and estuarine water, wastewater, sediment and mussel samples collected in the Conwy River and estuary. The aim of data collection was to monitor wastewater contamination in the freshwater-marine continuum. Samples were collected by trained members of staff from Bangor University at four weekly between March 2016 and August 2017. Treated and untreated wastewater samples were collected at four wastewater treatment plants along the...

Groundwater temperatures and levels from a field experiment in the Conwy Valley, North Wales, UK (2013-2015)

M.R. Marshall, H.C. Glanville & D.M. Cooper
Data showing groundwater temperature and levels from bore holes are presented. The data were collected from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment between December 2013 and June 2015. Data were recorded by pressure transducers installed in the bore holes. The data were collected by trained members of staff from Bangor University and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The samples were taken to estimate the hydraulic pathways and velocities through an experimental hillslope. The...

Data from: Combining fish and benthic communities into multiple regimes reveals complex reef dynamics

Mary K. Donovan, Alan M. Friedlander, Joey Lecky, Jean-Baptiste Jouffray, Gareth J. Williams, Lisa M. Wedding, Larry B. Crowder, Ashley L. Erickson, Nick A. J. Graham, Jamison M. Gove, Carrie V. Kappel, Kendra Karr, John N. Kittinger, Albert V. Norström, Magnus Nyström, Kirsten L. L. Oleson, Kostantinos A. Stamoulis, Crow White, Ivor D. Williams & Kimberly A. Selkoe
Coral reefs worldwide face an uncertain future with many reefs reported to transition from being dominated by corals to macroalgae. However, given the complexity and diversity of the ecosystem, research on how regimes vary spatially and temporally is needed. Reef regimes are most often characterised by their benthic components; however, complex dynamics are associated with losses and gains in both fish and benthic assemblages. To capture this complexity, we synthesised 3,345 surveys from Hawai‘i to...

Data from: Exploring preferences for variable delays over fixed delays to high-value food rewards as a model of food-seeking behaviours in humans

Laura-Jean G. Stokes, Anna Davies, Paul Lattimore, Catharine Winstanley & Robert D. Rogers
Foraging and operant models suggest that animals will tolerate uncertainty or risk to obtain food quickly. In modern food environments, sustained access to quick energy-dense foods can promote weight gain. Here, we used a discrete-choice procedure to examine peoples' decisions about when next to eat high-value, palatable food rewards, probabilistically delivered immediately or following longer delays. In Experiment 1, moderately hungry young females showed consistent preferences for a variable delay option that delivered food rewards...

Grass productivity data from a field site in the Conwy Valley (2016)

L.L. De Sosa, H.C. Glanville, M.R. Marshall, D.M. Cooper & D. Jones
Data are presented showing grass productivity as grammes per 100 square centimetres under four different nutrient treatments (water, nitrogen, phosphorus and nitrogen & phosphorus combined). An experimental hillslope in the Conwy catchment was selected in August 2016. Three transects, were identified across the hillslope. Along each transect, a 1 x 1 square metre quadrat was used to delineate randomly selected sampling areas. Within each quadrat 5 individual 10 x 10 x 10 centimetre (cm) swards...

Data from: Negative effects of vertebrate on invertebrate herbivores mediated by enhanced plant nitrogen content

Yu Zhu, Zhiwei Zhong, Jordi Pagès, Deborah Finke, Deli Wang, Quanhui Ma, Nazim Hassan, Zhu Hui, Ling Wang & Hui Zhu
1. Classic theory holds that the main interaction within the herbivore guild is competition, based on research focused on co-occurring, similarly-sized species that reduce the quantity of shared plant resources. However, plant quality may also be crucial in mediating herbivore interspecific interactions. This is especially true when competition occurs between distantly-related herbivore species, given that small terrestrial herbivores (e.g. insect herbivores) appear to be more sensitive to alterations of plant quality than plant quantity. 2....

Data from: Range-wide genomic data synthesis reveals transatlantic vicariance and secondary contact in Atlantic cod

Robert Fairweather, Ian R. Bradbury, Sarah J. Heylar, Mark De Bruyn, Nina O. Therkildsen, Paul Bentzen, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen & Gary R. Carvalho
Recent advances in genetic and genomic analysis have greatly improved our understanding of spatial population structure in marine species. However, studies addressing phylogeographic patterns at oceanic spatial scales remain rare. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), existing range‐wide examinations suggest significant transatlantic divergence, although the fine‐scale contemporary distribution of populations and potential for secondary contact are largely unresolved. Here, we explore transatlantic phylogeography in Atlantic cod using a data‐synthesis approach, integrating multiple genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...

Data from: Incorporating the geometry of dispersal and migration to understand spatial patterns of species distributions

Luis Gimenez
Dispersal and migration can be important drivers of species distributions. Because the paths followed by individuals of many species are curvilinear, spatial statistical models based on rectilinear coordinates systems would fail to predict population connectivity or the ecological consequences of migration or species invasions. I propose that we view migration/dispersal as if organisms were moving along curvilinear geometrical objects called smooth manifolds. In that view, the curvilinear pathways become the “shortest realised paths” arising from...

Data from: How quantitative is metabarcoding: a meta-analytical approach

Philip D Lamb, Ewan Hunter, John K Pinnegar, Simon Creer, Richard G Davies, Martin I. Taylor, Philip D. Lamb, Richard G. Davies & John K. Pinnegar
Metabarcoding has been used in a range of ecological applications such as taxonomic assignment, dietary analysis, and the analysis of environmental DNA. However, after a decade of use in these applications there is little consensus on the extent to which proportions of reads generated corresponds to the original proportions of species in a community. To quantify our current understanding we conducted a structured review and meta-analysis. The analysis suggests that a weak quantitative relationship may...

Tensiometer measurements from a field experiment in the Conwy valley, North Wales, UK (2013 - 2015)

M.R. Marshall, D.M. Cooper, H.C. Glanville & D. Jones
Data are presented of tensiometer measurements as centimetres of water from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment. The data were collected between October 2013 and January 2015 using tensiometers inserted into boreholes. The data were collected by trained members of staff from Bangor University and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The samples were taken to provide supporting information for assessing the relationship between soil microbial populations and soil moisture status. The data were...

Data from: Assessing bottom-trawling impacts based on the longevity of benthic invertebrates

Jan Geert Hiddink, Simon Jennings, Marija Sciberras, Stefan Bolam, Giulia Cambie, Robert McConnaughey, Tessa Mazor, Ray Hilborn, Jeremy Collie, C. Roland Pitcher, Ana Parma, Petri Suuronen, Michel Kaiser, Adriaan Rijnsdorp, Jeremy S. Collie, Michel J. Kaiser, Adriaan D. Rijnsdorp & Robert A. McConnaughey
1. Bottom trawling is the most widespread human activity directly affecting seabed habitats. Assessment and effective management of the effects of bottom trawling at the scale of fisheries requires an understanding of differences in sensitivity of biota to trawling. Responses to disturbance are expected to depend on the intrinsic rate of increase of populations (r), which is expected to be linearly related to the reciprocal of longevity. 2. We examine the relationship between the longevity...

Data from: Losing cichlid fish biodiversity: genetic and morphological homogenization of tilapia following colonization by introduced species

Asilatu Shechonge, Benjamin P. Ngatunga, Rashid Tamatamah, Stephanie J. Bradbeer, Jack Harrington, Antonia G.P. Ford, George F. Turner, Martin J. Genner & Antonia G. P. Ford
Among the many negative impacts of invasive species, hybridization with indigenous species has increasingly become recognized as a major issue. However, few studies have characterized the phenotypic outcomes of hybridization following biological invasions. Here we investigate the genetic and morphological consequences of stocking invasive tilapia species in two water bodies in central Tanzania. We sampled individuals from Mindu Reservoir on the Ruvu river system, and at Kidatu on the Great Ruaha-Rufiji river system. We screened...

Time series of microbial carbon release from soil as carbon dioxide under different nitrogen and phosphorus treatments with a low glucose concentration added as a carbon source in the Conwy catchment, North Wales, UK (2016)

H.C. Glanville, L.L. De Sosa, M.R. Marshall, D.M. Cooper & D.L. Jones
Time series data of carbon release in disintegrations per minute are presented for different nitrogen and phosphorus treatments with a low glucose concentration substrate added as a carbon source to soil samples from six depths (0-15, 15-30, 50-100, 100-150, 150-200 and 250-300 centimetres). Soil cores were collected from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment in July 2016 and returned the laboratories of the School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University. A high...

Time series of microbial carbon release from soil as carbon dioxide under different nitrogen and phosphorus treatments with a high molecular weight substrate added as a carbon source, Conwy catchment, North Wales, UK (2016)

H.C. Glanville, L.L. De Sosa, M.R. Marshall, D.M. Cooper & D.L. Jones
Time series data of carbon release in disintegrations per minute are presented for different nitrogen and phosphorus treatments with a high molecular weight substrate added as a carbon source to soil samples from six depths (0-15, 15-30, 50-100, 100-150, 150-200 and 250-300 centimetres). Soil cores were collected from a field experiment in the Conwy catchment in July 2016 and returned the laboratories of the School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University. A high...

Enteric virus concentrations, pH and turbidity in wastewater discharged to the Conwy River and estuary, North Wales (2016-2017)

K. Farkas, M.R. Marshall, D.M. Cooper, J.E. McDonald, S.K. Malham & D.L. Jones
This dataset contains pH, turbidity and viral concentration information in untreated and treated wastewater samples at wastewater discharge points and wastewater treatment plants along the Conwy River. The aim of the data collection was to investigate diurnal changes in enteric virus concentrations in wastewater and to investigate any correlation with wastewater pH and turbidity. Untreated wastewater samples were collected at one wastewater treatment plant for two events. Treated wastewater samples were collected at two wastewater...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    30

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    30

Affiliations

  • Bangor University
    30
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    9
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • University of Rhode Island
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2