94 Works

Context-dependent variability in the population prevalence and individual fitness effects of plant-fungal symbiosis

Marion Donald, Teresa Bohner, Kory Kolis, Alan Shadow, Jennifer Rudgers & Tom Miller
1. Heritable symbionts, found within a diverse array of flora and fauna, are often observed at intermediate prevalence within host populations, despite expectations that positive fitness feedbacks should drive beneficial symbionts to fixation. Intermediate prevalence may reflect neutral dynamics of symbionts with weak fitness effects, transient dynamics of symbionts trending toward fixation (or elimination), or a stable intermediate outcome determined by the balance of fitness effects and failed symbiont transmission. Theory suggests these outcomes should...

Data from: Probing the ecology and climate of the Eocene Southern Ocean with sand tiger sharks Striatolamia macrota

Sora Kim, Sarah Zeichner, Albert Colman, Howie Scher, Jürgen Kriwet & Thomas Mörs
During the Eocene, the Earth climate system transitioned from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. Central to many explanations is the Southern Ocean—where tectonic configurations influenced oceanic gateways, ocean circulation reduced heat transport, and/or greenhouse gas declines prompted glaciation. To date, few studies have explored the implications of this climate transition on high latitude, marine vertebrates. Seymour Island near the Antarctic Peninsula preserves a rich, diverse fossil assemblage in the Tertiary Eocene La Meseta (TELM) Formation (Fm)....

Habitat complexity dampens selection on prey activity level

Carl Keiser, Spencer Ingley, Benjamin Toscano, Inon Scharf & Jonathan Pruitt
Conspecific prey individuals often exhibit persistent differences in behavior (i.e., animal personality) and consequently vary in their susceptibility to predation. How this form of selection varies across environmental contexts is essential to predicting ecological and evolutionary dynamics, yet remains currently unresolved. Here, we use three separate predator–prey systems (sea star–snail, wolf spider–cricket, and jumping spider–cricket) to independently examine how habitat structural complexity influences the selection that predators impose on prey behavioral types. Prior to conducting...

Host identity and symbiotic association affects the genetic and taxonomic diversity of the clownfish-hosting sea anemone microbiome

Benjamin Titus, Robert Laroche, Estafania Rodriguez, Herman Wirshing & Christopher Meyer
All eukaryotic life engages in symbioses with a diverse community of bacteria that are essential for performing basic life functions. In many cases, eukaryotic organisms form additional symbioses with other macroscopic eukaryotes. The tightly-linked physical interactions that characterize many macroscopic symbioses creates opportunities for microbial transfer, which likely affects the diversity and function of individual microbiomes, and may ultimately lead to microbiome convergence between distantly related taxa. Here, we sequence the microbiomes of five species...

Local extinction risk under climate change in a neotropical asymmetrically dispersed epiphyte

Miguel Acevedo, Lydia Beaudrot, Elvia Melendez-Ackerman & Raymond Tremblay
1. The long-term fate of populations experiencing disequilibrium conditions with their environment will ultimately depend on how local colonization and extinction dynamics respond to abiotic conditions (e.g. temperature and rainfall), dispersal limitation and biotic interactions (e.g. competition, facilitation, or interactions with natural enemies). Understanding how these factors influence distributional dynamics under climate change is a major knowledge gap, particularly for small ranged and dispersal-limited plant species, which are at higher risk of extinction. Epiphytes are...

Data from: Quantifying demographic uncertainty: Bayesian methods for integral projection models (IPMs)

Bret D. Elderd & Tom E. X. Miller
Integral projection models (IPMs) are a powerful and popular approach to modeling population dynamics. Generalized linear models form the statistical backbone of an IPM. These models are typically fit using a frequentist approach. We suggest that hierarchical Bayesian statistical approaches offer important advantages over frequentist methods for building and interpreting IPMs, especially given the hierarchical nature of most demographic studies. Using a stochastic IPM for a desert cactus based on a 10-year study as a...

Data from: Reproductive losses due to climate change-induced earlier flowering are not the primary threat to plant population viability in a perennial herb

Amy M. Iler, Aldo Compagnoni, David W. Inouye, Jennifer L. Williams, Paul J. CaraDonna, Aaron Anderson & Tom E.X. Miller
1. Despite a global footprint of shifts in flowering phenology in response to climate change, the reproductive consequences of these shifts are poorly understood. Furthermore, it is unknown whether altered flowering times affect plant population viability. 2. We examine whether climate change-induced earlier flowering has consequences for population persistence by incorporating reproductive losses from frost damage (a risk of early flowering) in population models of a subalpine sunflower (Helianthella quinquenervis). Using long-term demographic data for...

Data from: Plant-fungal symbiosis affects litter decomposition during primary succession

Lukas Bell-Dereske, Xiaodong Gao, Caroline A. Masiello, Robert L. Sinsabaugh, Sarah M. Emery & Jennifer A. Rudgers
Microbial symbionts of plants can affect decomposition by altering the quality or quantity of host plant tissue (substrate) or the micro-environment where decomposition occurs (conditioning). In C3 grasses, foliar fungal endophytes (Clavicipitaceae) can increase plant resistance to drought and/or produce alkaloids that reduce herbivory – effects that may also influence host litter composition and subsequent litter decomposition. We studied the effect of the endophyte Epichloë sp. on litter decomposition in the Great Lakes dunes (USA)...

Data from: Genetic variation in social environment construction influences the development of aggressive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

Julia B. Saltz
Individuals are not merely subject to their social environments; they choose and create them, through a process called social environment (or social niche) construction. When genotypes differ in social environment-constructing behaviors, different genotypes are expected to experience different social environments. As social experience often affects behavioral development, quantitative genetics and psychology theories predict that genetic variation in social environment construction should have an important role in determining phenotypic variation; however, this hypothesis has not been...

Fruit/seed traits and phenology of trees in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

Onja H. Razafindratsima & Amy E. Dunham
This dataset contains information on fruit/seed traits of plants in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar as well as a summary of their fruiting phenology for the period of July 2012 - June 2014.

Data from: Seasonal population and individual niche dynamics in a tetra fish in the Pantanal wetlands

Raul Costa-Pereira, Luiz E. R. Tavares, Plínio Barbosa De Camargo & Márcio Silva Araújo
In seasonal tropical regions, rainfall and/or temporary floods during the wet season generally increase the abundance and diversity of food resources to many consumers as compared to the dry season. Therefore, seasonality can affect intraspecific competition and ecological opportunity, which are two important ecological mechanisms underlying population and individual niche variations. Here, we took advantage of the strong seasonality in the Pantanal wetlands to investigate how within- and between-individual diet variations relate to seasonal population...

Trade-off between fecundity and survival generates stabilizing selection on gall size

Scott Egan, Amanda Weaver, Glen Hood & Michael Foster
Complex interactions within multi-trophic communities are fundamental to the evolution of individual species that reside within them. One common outcome of species interactions are fitness trade-offs, where traits adaptive in some circumstances are maladaptive in others. Here, we identify a fitness trade-off between fecundity and survival in the cynipid wasp Callirhytis quercusbatatoides that induces multi-chambered galls on the stem of its host plant Quercus virginiana. We first quantified this trade-off in natural populations by documenting...

Data from: Drivers of individual niche variation in coexisting species

Raul Costa-Pereira, Volker H.W. Rudolf, Franco L. Souza, Marcio S. Araujo & Volker H. W. Rudolf
1. Although neglected by classic niche theory, individual variation is now recognized as a prevalent phenomenon in nature with evolutionary and ecological relevance. Recent theory suggests that differences in individual variation across competitors can affect species coexistence and community patterns. However, the degree of individual variation is flexible across wild populations and we still know little about the ecological drivers of this variation across populations of single species and, especially, across coexisting species. 2. Here...

Data from: A native plant competitor mediates the impact of above- and belowground damage on an invasive tree

Juli Carrillo & Evan Siemann
Plant competition may mediate the impacts of herbivory on invasive plant species through effects on plant growth and defense. This may predictably depend on whether herbivory occurs above- or belowground and on relative plant competitive ability. We simulated the potential impact of above- or belowground damage by biocontrol agents on the growth of a woody invader (Chinese tallow tree, Triadica sebifera) through artificial herbivory, with or without competition with a native grass, little bluestem (Schizachyrium...

Data from: Bayesian inference of reticulate phylogenies under the multispecies network coalescent

Luay Nakhleh, Dingqiao Wen & Yun Yu
The multispecies coalescent (MSC) is a statistical framework that models how gene genealogies grow within the branches of a species tree. The field of computational phylogenetics has witnessed an explosion in the development of methods for species tree inference under MSC, owing mainly to the accumulating evidence of incomplete lineage sorting in phylogenomic analyses. However, the evolutionary history of a set of genomes, or species, could be reticulate due to the occurrence of evolutionary processes...

Data from: Environmental DNA (eDNA) detects the invasive rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) at low abundances

Matthew M. Dougherty, Eric R. Larson, Mark A. Renshaw, Crysta A. Gantz, Scott P. Egan, Daniel M. Erickson & David M. Lodge
Early detection is invaluable for the cost-effective control and eradication of invasive species, yet many traditional sampling techniques are ineffective at the low population abundances found at the onset of the invasion process. Environmental DNA (eDNA) is a promising and sensitive tool for early detection of some invasive species, but its efficacy has not yet been evaluated for many taxonomic groups and habitat types. We evaluated the ability of eDNA to detect the invasive rusty...

Data from: Reticulate evolutionary history and extensive introgression in mosquito species revealed by phylogenetic network analysis

Dingqiao Wen, Yun Yu, Matthew W. Hahn & Luay Nakhleh
The role of hybridization and subsequent introgression has been demonstrated in an increasing number of species. Recently, Fontaine et al. (Science, 347, 2015, 1258524) conducted a phylogenomic analysis of six members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex. Their analysis revealed a reticulate evolutionary history and pointed to extensive introgression on all four autosomal arms. The study further highlighted the complex evolutionary signals that the co-occurrence of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression can give rise...

Data from: Genomic differentiation during speciation-with-gene-flow: comparing geographic and host-related variation in divergent life history adaptation in Rhagoletis pomonella

Meredith M. Doellman, Gregory J. Ragland, Glen R. Hood, Peter J. Meyers, Scott P. Egan, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Peter Lazorchak, Mary M. Glover, Cheyenne Tait, Hannes Schuler, Daniel A. Hahn, Stewart H. Berlocher, James J. Smith, Patrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder, Daniel Hahn, Stewart Berlocher, Peter Meyers, Scott Egan, Jeffrey Feder, Glen Hood, Thomas Powell & Gregory Ragland
A major goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how variation within populations gets partitioned into differences between reproductively isolated species. Here, we examine the degree to which diapause life history timing, a critical adaptation promoting population divergence, explains geographic and host-related genetic variation in ancestral hawthorn and recently derived apple-infesting races of Rhagoletis pomonella. Our strategy involved combining experiments on two different aspects of diapause (initial diapause intensity and adult eclosion time) with a...

Data from: Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets

Mary E. Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Heidi Eager, Laurent Frantz, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Verena J. Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Richard M. Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark C. Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright … & Mark Horton
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological...

Data from: Diflunisal inhibits prestin by chloride-dependent mechanism

Guillaume Duret, Fred A. Pereira & Robert M. Raphael
The motor protein prestin is a member of the SLC26 family of anion antiporters and is essential to the electromotility of cochlear outer hair cells and for hearing. The only direct inhibitor of electromotility and the associated charge transfer is salicylate, possibly through direct interaction with an anion-binding site on prestin. In a screen to identify other inhibitors of prestin activity, we explored the effect of the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug diflunisal, which is a derivative...

Data from: Resolving biological impacts of multiple heat waves: interaction of hot and recovery days

Chun-Sen Ma, Lin Wang, Wei Zhang & Volker H. W. Rudolf
Heat waves are increasing with global warming and have more dramatic biological effects on organisms in natural and agricultural ecosystems than mean temperature increase. However, predicting the impact of future heat waves on organisms and ecosystems is challenging because we still have a limited understanding of how the different components that characterize heat waves interact. Here we take an experimental approach to examine the individual and combine consequences of two important features that characterize heat...

Brewster angle optical reflection observation of self-limiting nanoparticle monolayer self-assembly at a liquid/liquid interface

Jiayang Hu, Brady Pan, Takuma Makihara, Roy D. J. Garcia & Irving P. Herman
Real-time optical reflection of incident p-polarized light near Brewster’s angle shows that after drop-casting iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in heptane on top of a diethylene glycol (DEG) liquid substrate, an iron oxide NP layer forms at the DEG/heptane interface, and it self-limits to a monolayer even when there are excess NPs dispersed in the upper heptane phase. Most modes of NP self-assembly do not self-limit growth after the formation of a single monolayer. Observations are...

Interview between Lesli Vollrath and Salise Shuttlesworth

Lesli Vollrath

Data from: Queen presence mediates the relationship between collective behavior and disease susceptibility in ant colonies

Carl N. Keiser, Svjetlana Vojvodic, Imani O. Butler, Elizabeth Sartain, Volker H. W. Rudolf & Julia B. Saltz
The success of social living can be explained, in part, by a group's ability to execute collective behaviors unachievable by solitary individuals. However, groups vary in their ability to execute these complex behaviors, often because they vary in their phenotypic composition. Group membership changes over time due to mortality or emigration, potentially leaving groups vulnerable to ecological challenges in times of flux. In some societies, the loss of important individuals (e.g., leaders, elites, queens) may...

Data from: Life-history and behavioral trait covariation across 3 years in Temnothorax ants

Sarah E. Bengston
Consistent among- individual differences in behavior have been described in numerous taxa. More recently, the hypothesis that such behavioral variation may also correlate to life-history traits, such as investment in current or future reproduction, has been proposed as a potential explanation for why variation is maintained among and within populations. A continual challenge in measuring the integration of these traits, or the Pace – of – Life Syndrome, is to find a reliable and quantifiable...

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