21 Works

Data from: Extensive clonal spread and longevity of saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) provide insight into management plans

Mizuki K Takahashi, Liana M Horner, Toshiro Kubota, Nathan A Keller & Warren G Abrahamson
As an ecologically important foundation species, Serenoa repens provides crucial structural and functional services to many southeastern United States ecosystems. Its fruits are valuable to many vertebrates including medicinal uses by humans. Many land managers, however, consider Serenoa a troublesome plant that spread rapidly to dominate other plants. Accordingly, management plans have been developed to reduce Serenoa. Yet, we have little evidence of Serenoa spread/invasion. Furthermore, our understanding of its life history traits including generation...

Data from: Effects of developmental conditions on growth, stress, and telomeres in black-legged kittiwake chicks

Rebecca C. Young, Jorg Welcker, Christopher P. Barger, Scott A. Hatch, Thomas Merkling, Evgenia V. Kitaiskaia, Mark F. Haussmann & Alexander S. Kitaysky
Early-life conditions can drive ageing patterns and life history strategies throughout the lifespan. Certain social, genetic, and nutritional developmental conditions are more likely to produce high-quality offspring: those with good likelihood of recruitment and productivity. Here we call such conditions “favored states” and explore their relationship with physiological variables during development in a long-lived seabird, the black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla). Two favored states were experimentally generated by manipulation of food availability and brood size, while...

Data from: Immune responses in hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) with white-nose syndrome

Thomas M. Lilley, Jenni M. Prokkola, Joseph S. Johnson, Elizabeth J. Rogers, Sarah Gronsky, Allen Kurta, DeeAnn M. Reeder & Kenneth A. Field
White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease responsible for decimating many bat populations in North America. Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the psychrophilic fungus responsible for WNS, prospers in the winter habitat of many hibernating bat species. The immune response that Pd elicits in bats is not yet fully understood; antibodies are produced in response to infection by Pd, but they may not be protective and indeed may be harmful. To understand how bats respond to infection...

Data from: Glucocorticoid metabolism in the in ovo environment modulates exposure to maternal corticosterone in Japanese quail embryos (Coturnix japonica)

Brian G. Vassallo, Ryan T. Paitz, Vincent J. Fasanello & Mark F. Haussmann
Maternal effects have gained attention as a method by which mothers may alter the physiological condition and phenotype of their offspring based upon current environmental conditions. The physiological and phenotypic outcomes of glucocorticoid-mediated maternal effects have been extensively studied in a variety of vertebrates; however, the underlying mechanism is currently unclear. Here, we injected tritiated corticosterone into the yolks of freshly laid Japanese quail eggs (Coturnix japonica) and traced its movement and metabolism through the...

Data from: Genetic consequences of Pleistocene sea-level change on Hawaiian Megalagrion damselflies

Brandon R. Jones & Steve Jordan
The Hawaiian Islands have long been an important laboratory for evolutionary research because their geological histories offer many natural experiments. For example, the Maui Nui complex, 4 islands that have been repeatedly connected and separated by fluctuating sea levels, lie near Hawaii Island, which has never been connected to another island. Here, we examine the genetic consequences of fluctuating island areas and connectivity using microsatellite analysis of 2 widespread, endemic Hawaiian damselflies. We screened 152...

Data from: Costs of immunity and their role in the range expansion of the house sparrow in Kenya

Lynn B. Martin, Holly J. Kilvitis, Amber J. Brace, Laken Cooper, Mark F. Haussmann, Alex Mutati, Vincent Fasanello, Sara O'Brien & Daniel R. Ardia
There are at least two reasons to study traits that mediate successful range expansions. First, dispersers will found new populations and thus impact the distribution and evolution of species. Second, organisms moving into new areas will influence the fate of resident communities, directly competing with or indirectly affecting residents by spreading non-native or spilling-back native parasites. The success of invaders in new areas is likely mediated by a counterbalancing of costly traits. In new areas...

Data from: What you need is what you eat? Prey selection by the bat Myotis daubentonii

Eero J. Vesterinen, Lasse Ruokolainen, Niklas Wahlberg, Carlos Peña, Tomas Roslin, Veronika N. Laine, Ville Vasko, Ilari E. Sääksjärvi, Kai Norrdahl & Thomas M. Lilley
Optimal foraging theory predicts that predators are selective when faced with abundant prey, but become less picky when prey gets sparse. Insectivorous bats in temperate regions are faced with the challenge of building up fat reserves vital for hibernation during a period of decreasing arthropod abundances. According to optimal foraging theory, prehibernating bats should adopt a less selective feeding behaviour – yet empirical studies have revealed many apparently generalized species to be composed of specialist...

Data from: Longevity and life history coevolve with oxidative stress in birds

Csongor I. Vágási, Orsolya Vincze, Laura Pătraș, Gergely Osváth, Janka Pénzes, Mark F. Haussmann, Zoltán Barta & Péter László Pap
1. The mechanisms that underpin the evolution of ageing and life histories remain elusive. Oxidative stress, which results in accumulated cellular damages, is one of the mechanisms suggested to play a role. 2. In this paper we set out to test the ‘oxidative stress theory of ageing’ and the ‘oxidative stress hypothesis of life histories’ using a comprehensive phylogenetic comparison based on an unprecedented dataset of oxidative physiology in 88 free-living bird species. 3. We...

Data from: Voluntary locomotor activity mitigates oxidative damage associated with isolation stress in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster)

Kelsey L. Fletcher, Brittany N. Whitley, Lisa A. Treidel, David Thompson, Annie Williams, Jose C. Noguera, Jennie R. Stevenson & Mark F. Haussmann
Organismal performance directly depends on an individual's ability to cope with a wide array of physiological challenges. For social animals, social isolation is a stressor that has been shown to increase oxidative stress. Another physiological challenge, routine locomotor activity, has been found to decrease oxidative stress levels. Because we currently do not have a good understanding of how diverse physiological systems like stress and locomotion interact to affect oxidative balance, we studied this interaction in...

Data from: The influence of multiple functional demands on morphological diversification: A test on turtle shells

Charles Tristan Stayton, Lauren F. O'Conner, Nicole Marie Nisivoccia & Lauren F. O'Connor
Organismal parts are often involved in the performance of more than one function. The role of trade-offs in influencing phenotypic evolution of such parts is well-studied; less well-understood is their role in influencing phenotypic diversity. Increases in the number of functions a part is involved in may inhibit subsequent diversification, as the number of trade-offs increases. Alternately, such an increase might promote phenotypic diversification, by increasing adaptive landscape complexity and promoting specialization for different roles....

Data from: Prey size and dietary niche of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii)

Luke E. Dodd, Michael J. Lacki, Joseph S. Johnson & Lynne K. Rieske
Bats in the genus Corynorhinus possess a suite of morphological characters that permit them to effectively use both gleaning and aerial-hawking foraging strategies to capture Lepidoptera. Consequently, they occupy a specialized feeding niche within North American bat assemblages and are of particular interest for dietary studies. We collected fecal pellets from a colony of C. rafinesquii (Rafinesque's Big-Eared Bat) at Mammoth Cave National Park during August–October 2011 and amplified cytochrome-c oxidase subunit 1 fragments of...

Is there an oxidative cost of acute stress? Characterization, implication of glucocorticoids, and modulation by prior stress experience

Mark Haussmann
Acute rises in glucocorticoid hormones allow individuals to adaptively respond to environmental challenges but may also have negative consequences, including oxidative stress. While the effects of chronic glucocorticoid exposure on oxidative stress have been well characterized, those of acute stress or glucocorticoid exposure have mostly been overlooked. We examined the relationship between acute stress exposure, glucocorticoids, and oxidative stress in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). We (i) characterized the pattern of oxidative stress during an acute...

A basic ddRADseq two-enzyme protocol performs well in herbarium and silica-dried tissues across four genera

Ingrid Jordon-Thaden, James Beck, Catherine Rushworth, Michael Windham, Nicolas Diaz, Jason Cantley, Chris Martine & Carl Rothfels
Premise of the study: The ability to sequence genome-scale data from herbarium specimens would allow for the economical development of broad datasets with taxonomic and geographic sampling not otherwise possible. Here we evaluate the utility of a basic restriction site-associated DNA (ddRADseq) protocol with DNAs from four genera extracted from both silica-dried and herbarium tissue. Methods: DNAs from Draba, Boechera, Solidago, and Ilex were processed with a double-digest restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) protocol. The...

Data from: Repeated stressors in adulthood increase the rate of biological ageing

Michaela Hau, Mark F. Haussmann, Timothy J. Greives, Christa Matlack, David Costantini, Michael Quetting, James S. Adelman, Ana Catarina Miranda & Jesko Partecke
Background: Individuals of the same age can differ substantially in the degree to which they have accumulated tissue damage, akin to bodily wear and tear, from past experiences. This accumulated tissue damage reflects the individual’s biological age and may better predict physiological and behavioural performance than the individual‘s chronological age. However, at present it remains unclear how to reliably assess biological age in individual wild vertebrates. Methods: We exposed hand-raised adult Eurasian blackbirds (Turdus merula)...

Data from: Higher-level phylogeny and reclassification of Lampyridae (Coleoptera: Elateroidea)

Gavin Martin, Kathrin Stanger-Hall, Marc Branham, Luiz Da Silveira, Sarah Lower, David Hall, Xue-Yan Li, Alan Lemmon, Emily Lemmon & Seth Bybee
Fireflies (Lampyridae) are a diverse family of beetles which exhibit an array of morphologies including varying antennal and photic organ morphologies. Due in part to their morphological diversity, the classification within the Lampyridae has long been in flux. Here we use an anchored hybrid enrichment approach to reconstruct the most extensive molecular phylogeny of Lampyridae to date (436 loci and 98 taxa) and to evaluate firefly higher-level classification. We propose several classification changes supported by...

Data from: The effects of food supply on reproductive hormones and timing of reproduction in an income-breeding seabird

Shannon Whelan, Scott A. Hatch, Z. Morgan Benowitz-Fredericks, Charline Parenteau, Olivier Chastel & Kyle Elliott
Current food supply is a major driver of timing of breeding in income-breeding animals, likely because increased net energy balance directly increases reproductive hormones and advances breeding. In capital breeders, increased net energy balance increases energy reserves, which eventually leads to improved reproductive readiness and earlier breeding. To test the hypothesis that phenology of income-breeding birds is independent of energy reserves, we conducted an experiment on food-supplemented (“fed”) and control female black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla)....

Data from: Demographic modelling reveals a history of divergence with gene flow for a glacially tied stonefly in a changing post-Pleistocene landscape

Scott Hotaling, Clint C. Muhlfeld, J. Joseph Giersch, Omar A. Ali, Steve Jordan, Michael R. Miller, Gordon Luikart & David W. Weisrock
Aim: Climate warming is causing extensive loss of glaciers in mountainous regions, yet our understanding of how glacial recession influences evolutionary processes and genetic diversity is limited. Linking genetic structure with the influences shaping it can improve understanding of how species respond to environmental change. Here, we used genome-scale data and demographic modelling to resolve the evolutionary history of Lednia tumana, a rare, aquatic insect endemic to alpine streams. We also employed a range of...

Data from: Sex and hibernaculum temperature predict survivorship in white-nose syndrome affected little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus)

Laura E. Grieneisen, Sarah A. Brownlee-Bouboulis, Joseph S. Johnson & DeeAnn M. Reeder
White-nose syndrome (WNS), an emerging infectious disease caused by the novel fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has devastated North American bat populations since its discovery in 2006. The little brown myotis, Myotis lucifugus, has been especially affected. The goal of this 2-year captive study was to determine the impact of hibernacula temperature and sex on WNS survivorship in little brown myotis that displayed visible fungal infection when collected from affected hibernacula. In study 1, we found that...

Data from: Energy conserving thermoregulatory patterns and lower disease severity in a bat resistant to the impacts of white-nose syndrome

Marianne S. Moore, Kenneth A. Field, Melissa J. Behr, Gregory G. Turner, Morgan E. Furze, Daniel W. F. Stern, Paul R. Allegra, Sarah A. Bouboulis, Chelsey D. Musante, Megan E. Vodzak, Matthew E. Biron, Melissa B. Meierhofer, Winifred F. Frick, Jeffrey T. Foster, Daryl Howell, Joseph A. Kath, Allen Kurta, Gerda Nordquist, Joseph S. Johnson, Thomas M. Lilley, Benjamin W. Barrett & DeeAnn M. Reeder
The devastating bat fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS), does not appear to affect all species equally. To experimentally determine susceptibility differences between species, we exposed hibernating naïve little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) and big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to the fungus that causes WNS, Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). After hibernating under identical conditions, Pd lesions were significantly more prevalent and more severe in little brown myotis. This species difference in pathology correlates with susceptibility to WNS...

Data from: Exogenous glucocorticoids amplify the costs of infection by reducing resistance and tolerance, but effects are mitigated by co-infection

Laura A. Schoenle, Ignacio T. Moore, Alana M. Dudek, Ellen B. Garcia, Morgan Mays, Mark F. Haussmann, Daniela Cimini & Frances Bonier
Individual variation in parasite defenses, such as resistance and tolerance, can underlie heterogeneity in fitness and could influence disease transmission dynamics. Glucocorticoid hormone concentrations often change in response to fluctuating environmental conditions and mediate changes in immune function, resource allocation, and tissue repair. Thus, changes in glucocorticoid hormone concentrations might mediate individual variation in investment in resistance versus tolerance. In this study, we experimentally increased glucocorticoid concentrations in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) that were naturally...

Genomic data reveal similar genetic differentiation in aquifer species with different dispersal capabilities and life histories

Steve Jordan, Brian Hand, Scott Hotaling, Amanda DelVecchia, Rachel Malison, Clark Nissley, Gordon Luikart & Jack Standford
Little is known about the life histories, genetic structure, and population connectivity of shallow groundwater organisms. We used next-generation sequencing (RAD-seq) to analyze population genomic structure in two aquifer species: Paraperla frontalis (Banks, 1902), a stonefly with groundwater larvae and aerial (winged) adults, and Stygobromus sp., a groundwater-obligate amphipod. We found similar genetic differentiation in each species between floodplains separated by ~70 river km in the Flathead River basin of NW Montana, USA. Given that...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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    4
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • Bucknell University
    21
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • Eastern Michigan University
    2
  • University of Kentucky
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • CIUDAD
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Antwerp
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  • Wichita State University
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