50 Works

Data for pre-fire and post-fire surface fuel loading in a Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest.

C. Alina Cansler, Mark E. Swanson, Tucker J., Andrew J. Larson & James A. Lutz

Data from Kruger Park Porometry Project

Andrew Kulmatiski

Alllenrolfea Wetland Genetics Data

Paul G. Wolf, Carol A. Rowe & Robert W. Lichvar

Elk female age, brucellosis status, and pregnancy status collected over >20 years at winter feedgrounds in Wyoming

Johan T. du Toit & Gavin Cotterill

Data from: Priority effects within coinfected hosts can drive unexpected population-scale patterns of parasite prevalence

Patrick A. Clay, Michael H. Cortez, Meghan A. Duffy & Volker H. W. Rudolf
Organisms are frequently coinfected by multiple parasite strains and species, and interactions between parasites within hosts are known to influence parasite prevalence and diversity, as well as epidemic timing. Importantly, interactions between coinfecting parasites can be affected by the order in which they infect hosts (i.e. within-host priority effects). In this study, we use a single-host, two-pathogen, SI model with environmental transmission to explore how within-host priority effects scale up to alter host population-scale infection...

Data from: Predation shapes the evolutionary traits of cervid weapons

Matthew C. Metz, Douglas J. Emlen, Daniel R. Stahler, Daniel R. MacNulty, Douglas W. Smith & Mark Hebblewhite
Sexually selected weapons evolved to maximize the individual reproductive success of males in many polygynous breeding species. Many weapons are also retained outside of reproductive periods for secondary reasons, but the importance of these secondary functions is poorly understood. Here we leveraged a unique opportunity from the predator–prey system in northern Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA to evaluate whether predation by a widespread, coursing predator (wolves) has influenced a specific weapon trait (antler retention time)...

Data from: Genetic constraints on wing pattern variation in Lycaeides butterflies: a case study on mapping complex, multifaceted traits in structured populations

Lauren K. Lucas, Chris C. Nice, Zach Gompert & Zachariah Gompert
Patterns of phenotypic variation within and among species can be shaped and constrained by trait genetic architecture. This is particularly true for complex traits, such as butterfly wing patterns, that consist of multiple elements. Understanding the genetics of complex trait variation across species boundaries is difficult, as it necessitates mapping in structured populations and can involve many loci with small or variable phenotypic effects. Here, we investigate the genetic architecture of complex wing pattern variation...

Data from: Parental habituation to human disturbance over time reduces fear of humans in coyote offspring

Christopher J. Schell, Julie K. Young, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Rachel M. Santymie, Jill M. Mateo & Rachel M. Santymire
A fundamental tenet of maternal effects assumes that maternal variance over time should have discordant consequences for offspring traits across litters. Yet, seldom are parents observed across multiple reproductive bouts, with few studies considering anthropogenic disturbances as an ecological driver of maternal effects. We observed captive coyote (Canis latrans) pairs over two successive litters to determine whether among-litter differences in behavior (i.e., risk-taking) and hormones (i.e., cortisol and testosterone) corresponded with parental plasticity in habituation....

Data from: Large-effect mutations generate trade-off between predatory and locomotor ability during arms race coevolution with deadly prey

Michael T.J. Hague, Gabriela Toledo, Shana L. Geffeney, Charles T. Hanifin, , , Michael T. J. Hague & Edmund D. Brodie
Adaptive evolution in response to one selective challenge may disrupt other important aspects of performance. Such evolutionary trade-offs are predicted to arise in the process of local adaptation, but it is unclear if these phenotypic compromises result from the antagonistic effects of simple amino acid substitutions. We tested for trade-offs associated with beneficial mutations that confer tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistance in the voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.4) in skeletal muscle of the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis)....

Genetic Engineering in Agriculture Curricula for Grades 9-12

Tyson Sorenson, Olivia Horning, Kelsey Hall, David Francis & Joshua Dallin

Genetic differentiation between two species of buckwheat (Eriogonum)

Paul G. Wolf & Jenessa B. Lemon

Data from: Vertical differentiation in tropical forest butterflies: a novel mechanism generating insect diversity?

Chris C. Nice, James A. Fordyce, Katherine L. Bell, Matthew L. Forister, Zachariah Gompert & Phil J. DeVries
Many tropical fruit-feeding nymphalid butterflies are associated with either the forest canopy or the understory, however, the exceptions offer insights into the origins of tropical diversity. As it occurs in both habitats of tropical forests in Ecuador and Peru, Archaeoprepona demophon is one such exception. We compared patterns of occurrence of A. demophon in the canopy and understory and population genomic variation for evidence of ecological and genetic differentiation between habitats. We found that butterfly...

Data from: The predictability of genomic changes underlying a recent host shift in Melissa blue butterflies

Samridhi Chaturvedi, Lauren K. Lucas, Chris C. Nice, James A. Fordyce, Matt L. Forister, Zachariah Gompert & Matthew L. Forister
Despite accumulating evidence that evolution can be predictable, studies quantifying the predictability of evolution remain rare. Here, we measured the predictability of genome-wide evolutionary changes associated with a recent host shift in the Melissa blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa). We asked whether and to what extent genome-wide patterns of evolutionary change in nature could be predicted (1) by comparisons among instances of repeated evolution, and (2) from SNP $\times$ performance associations in a lab experiment. We...

Data from: Distance, elevation, and environment as drivers of diversity and divergence in bumble bees across latitude and altitude

Jason M. Jackson, Meaghan L. Pimsler, K. Jeannet Oyen, Jonathan B. Koch-Uhuad, James D. Herndon, James P. Strange, Michael E. Dillon, Jeffrey D. Lozier & Kennan Jeannet Oyen
Identifying drivers of dispersal limitation and genetic differentiation is a key goal in biogeography. We examine patterns of population connectivity and genetic diversity using Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) in two bumble bee species, Bombus vosnesenskii and Bombus bifarius across latitude and altitude in mountain ranges from California, Oregon, and Washington, U.S.A. Bombus vosnesenskii, which occurs across a broader elevational range at most latitudes, exhibits little population structure while B. bifarius, which occupies a relatively...

Data from: Deconstruction of a plant-arthropod community reveals influential plant traits with nonlinear effects on arthropod assemblages

Joshua G. Harrison, Casey Philbin, Zach Gompert, Glen Forister, Leonardo Hernandez, Benjamin W. Sullivan, Ian Wallace, Lyra Beltran, Craig Dodson, Jacob S. Francis, Amie Schlageter, Oren Shelef, Su'ad Yoon, Matthew L. Forister, Ian S. Wallace, Su'ad A. Yoon, Zachariah Gompert, Casey S. Philbin, Craig D. Dodson, Leonardo Hernandez-Espinoza & Glen W. Forister
1. Studies of herbivores and secondary consumer communities rarely incorporate a comprehensive characterization of primary producer trait variation, thus limiting our understanding of how plants mediate community assembly of consumers. 2. We took advantage of recent technological developments for efficient generation of phytochemical, microbial, and genomic data to characterize individual alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa; Fabaceae) growing in an old-field, semi-naturalized state for 770 traits (including 753 chemical features). Using random forest modeling, we investigated the...

Data from: Global macroevolution and macroecology of passerine song

William David Pearse, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, Logan S. James, Maxwell Farrell, Frédéric Boivin, T. Jonathan Davies & William D. Pearse
Studying the macroevolution of the songs of Passeriformes (perching birds) has proved challenging. The complexity of the task stems not just from the macroevolutionary and macroecological challenge of modelling so many species, but also from the difficulty in collecting and quantifying birdsong itself. Using machine learning techniques, we extracted songs from a large citizen science dataset, and then analysed the evolution, and biotic and abiotic predictors of variation in birdsong across 578 passerine species. Contrary...

Data from: Herbivory and eutrophication mediate grassland plant nutrient responses across a global climatic gradient

T. Michael Anderson, Daniel M. Griffith, James B. Grace, Eric M. Lind, Peter B. Adler, Lori A. Biederman, Dana M. Blumenthal, Pedro Daleo, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Andrew S. MacDougall, Rebecca L. McCulley, Suzanne M. Prober, Anita C. Risch, Mahesh Sankaran, Martin Schütz, Eric W. Seabloom, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Peter D. Wragg & Elizabeth T. Borer
Plant stoichiometry, the relative concentration of elements, is a key regulator of ecosystem functioning and is also being altered by human activities. In this paper we sought to understand the global drivers of plant stoichiometry and compare the relative contribution of climatic vs. anthropogenic effects. We addressed this goal by measuring plant elemental (C, N, P and K) responses to eutrophication and vertebrate herbivore exclusion at eighteen sites on six continents. Across sites, climate and...

Incorporating Drones in My Classroom: Survey Data from High School Teachers

Tyson Sorenson, Kelsey Hall, Olivia Horning, Joshua Dallin & Davis Francis

Reproductive success of mountain pine beetle infesting cut bolts of Great Basin bristlecone pine, limber pine, and lodgepole pine

Barbara J. Bentz, Karen E. Mock & Erika L. Eidson

General NM data Jakus and Akhundjanov

Paul M. Jakus & Sherzod B. Akhundjanov

USU Careers in Agriculture, Forestry, Natural Resources, grades 9-12

Tyson Sorenson, Olivia Horning & Joshua Dallin

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    50

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    50

Affiliations

  • Utah State University
    50
  • University of Minnesota
    5
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Nevada Reno
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • University of Guelph
    3
  • Texas State University
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Pretoria
    2
  • University of Notre Dame
    2