3 Works

Data from: Social networks predict gut microbiome composition in wild baboons

Jenny Tung, Luis B. Barriero, Michael B. Burns, J. C. Grenier, Josh Lynch, L. E. Grieneisen, J. Altmann, S. C. Alberts, R. Blekhman, E. A. Archie, Laura E Grieneisen, Elizabeth A Archie, Susan C Alberts, Jeanne Altmann, Luis B Barreiro, Jean-Christophe Grenier, Michael B Burns & Ran Blekhman
Social relationships have profound effects on health in humans and other primates, but the mechanisms that explain this relationship are not well understood. Using shotgun metagenomic data from wild baboons, we found that social group membership and social network relationships predicted both the taxonomic structure of the gut microbiome and the structure of genes encoded by gut microbial species. Rates of interaction directly explained variation in the gut microbiome, even after controlling for diet, kinship,...

Data from: Rapid and repeatable shifts in life-history timing of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) following colonization of novel host plants in the Pacific Northwestern United States

Monte Mattsson, Glen R. Hood, Jeffrey L. Feder & Luis A. Ruedas
Host shifts of phytophagous insect specialists to novel plants can result in divergent ecological adaptation, generating reproductive isolation and potentially new species. Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies in eastern North America underwent a host shift ~160 ya from native downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to introduced, domesticated apple (Malus domestica). Divergent selection on diapause phenology related to the earlier fruiting time of apples versus downy hawthorns resulted in partial allochronic reproductive isolation between the fly races. Here,...

Data from: Quantification of mesocosm fish and amphibian species diversity via eDNA metabarcoding

Nathan T. Evans, Brett P. Olds, Cameron R. Turner, Mark A. Renshaw, Yiyuan Li, Christopher L. Jerde, Andrew R. Mahon, Michael E. Pfrender, Gary A. Lamberti & David M. Lodge
Freshwater fauna are particularly sensitive to environmental change and disturbance. Management agencies frequently use fish and amphibian biodiversity as indicators of ecosystem health and a way to prioritize and assess management strategies. Traditional aquatic bioassessment that relies on capture of organisms via nets, traps and electrofishing gear typically has low detection probabilities for rare species and can injure individuals of protected species. Our objective was to determine whether environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling and metabarcoding analysis...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Notre Dame
    3
  • Notre Dame University
    3
  • Princeton University
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Portland State University
    1
  • University of Montreal
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • Institute of Primate Research
    1
  • Central Michigan University
    1