10 Works

Modeling human migration across spatial scales in Colombia

Amir Siraj, Alessandro Sorichetta, Guido España, Andrew Tatem & Alex Perkins
Human mobility, both short and long term, are important considerations in the study of numerous systems. Economic and technological advances have led to a more interconnected global community, further increasing the need for considerations of human mobility. While data on human mobility are better recorded in many developed countries, availability of such data remains limited in many low- and middle-income countries around the world, particularly at the fine temporal and spatial scales required by many...

Data from: Plant uptake offsets silica release from a large Arctic tundra wildfire

Joanna C. Carey, Benjamin W. Abbott & Adrian V. Rocha
Rapid climate change at high latitudes is projected to increase wildfire extent in tundra ecosystems by up to five-fold by the end of the century. Tundra wildfire could alter terrestrial silica (SiO2) cycling by restructuring surface vegetation and by deepening the seasonally-thawed active layer. These changes could influence the availability of silica in terrestrial permafrost ecosystems and alter lateral exports to downstream marine waters, where silica is often a limiting nutrient. In this context, we...

Data from: Multi-scale predictors of parasite risk in wild male savanna baboons (Papio cynocephalus)

Bobby Habig, David A.W.A.M. Jansen, Mercy Y. Akinyi, Laurence R. Gesquiere, Susan C. Alberts & Elizabeth A. Archie
Several factors are thought to shape male parasite risk in polygynous and polygynandrous mammals, including male-male competition, investment in potentially immunosuppressive hormones, and dispersal. Parasitism is also driven by processes occurring at larger scales, including host social groups and populations. To date, studies that test parasite-related costs of male behavior at all three scales—individual hosts, social groups, and the host population—remain rare. To fill this gap, we investigated multi-scale predictors of helminth parasitism in 97...

Data from: Allometric scaling laws linking biomass and rooting depth vary across ontogeny and functional groups in tropical dry forest lianas and trees

Chris M. Smith-Martin, Xiangtao Xu, David Medvigy, Stefan Schnitzer & Jennifer Powers
There are two theories about how allocation of metabolic products occurs. The allometric biomass partitioning theory (APT) suggests that all plants follow common allometric scaling rules. The optimal partitioning theory (OPT) predicts that plants allocate more biomass to the organ capturing the most limiting resource. We used whole-plant harvests of mature and juvenile tropical deciduous trees, evergreen trees, and lianas and model simulations to address the following knowledge gaps: 1) Do mature lianas comply with...

Data from: Genes, geology, and germs: gut microbiota across a primate hybrid zone are explained by site soil properties, not host species

Laura E. Grieneisen, Marie J. E. Charpentier, Susan C. Alberts, Ran Blekhman, Gideon Bradburd, Jenny Tung & Elizabeth A. Archie
Gut microbiota in geographically isolated host populations are often distinct. These differences have been attributed to between-population differences in host behaviors, environments, genetics, and geographic distance. However, which factors are most important remains unknown. Here we fill this gap for baboons by leveraging information on 13 environmental variables from 14 baboon populations spanning a natural hybrid zone. Sampling across a hybrid zone allowed us to additionally test whether phylosymbiosis (codiversification between hosts and their microbiota)...

Data from: Successional loss of two key food tree species best explains decline in group size of Panamanian howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata)

Katharine Milton, David W. Armitage & Wayne P. Sousa.
Negative impacts of discrete, short-term disturbances to wildlife populations are well-documented. The consequences of more gradual environmental change are less apparent and harder to study because they play out over longer periods and are often indirect in their action. Yet, they can drive the decline of wildlife populations even in seemingly pristine and currently well-protected habitats. One such environmental change is a successional shift in a community’s species composition as it regenerates from disturbance caused...

Identifying diagnostic genetic markers for a cryptic invasive agricultural pest: a test case using the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Meredith M. Doellman, Glen R. Hood, Jacob Gersfeld, Amanda Driscoe, Charles C.Y. Xu, Ryan N. Sheehy, Noah Holmes, Wee L. Yee & Jeffrey L. Feder
Insect pests destroy ~15% of all USA crops, resulting in losses of $15 billion annually. Thus, developing cheap, quick and reliable methods for detecting harmful species is critical to curtail insect damage and lessen economic impact. The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a major invasive pest threatening the multibillion-dollar apple industry in the Pacific Northwest USA. The fly is also sympatric with a benign but morphologically similar and genetically closely related species,...

Data from: Habitat explains patterns of population decline for an invasive crayfish

Eric R. Larson, Timothy A. Kreps, Brett Peters, Jody A. Peters & David M. Lodge
Invasive non-indigenous species are defined by their impacts: they substantially change native communities or ecosystems. Accordingly, invasive species might transform their habitats in ways that eventually become unfavorable to them, causing population declines or even extirpations. Here we use over 40 years of systematically collected data on the abundance of the invasive rusty crayfish Faxonius rusticus from 17 lakes in northern Wisconsin, USA to explore if population declines of this invader are related to the...

Data from: Costs and drivers of helminth parasite infection in wild female baboons

Mercy Y. Akinyi, David Jansen, Bobby Habig, Laurence Gesquiere, Susan C. Alberts & Elizabeth A. Archie
1. Helminth parasites can have wide ranging, detrimental effects on host reproduction and survival. These effects are best documented in humans and domestic animals, while only a few studies in wild mammals have identified both the forces that drive helminth infection risk and their costs to individual fitness. 2. Working in a well-studied population of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus) in the Amboseli ecosystem in Kenya, we pursued two goals, to: (i) examine the costs of...

Precision mapping of snail habitat provides a powerful indicator of human schistosomiasis transmission

Chelsea Wood, Susanne Sokolow, Isabel Jones, Andrew Chamberlin, Kevin Lafferty, Armand Kuris, Merlijn Jocque, Skylar Hopkins, Grant Adams, Julia Buck, Andrea Lund, Ana Garcia-Vedrenne, Evan Fiorenza, Jason Rohr, Fiona Allan, Bonnie Webster, Muriel Rabone, Joanne Webster, Lydie Bandagny, Raphael Ndione, Simon Senghor, Anne-Marie Schacht, Nicolas Jouanard, Gilles Riveau & Giulio De Leo
Recently, the World Health Organization recognized that efforts to interrupt schistosomiasis transmission through mass drug administration have been ineffective in some regions; one of their new recommended strategies for global schistosomiasis control emphasizes targeting the freshwater snails that transmit schistosome parasites. We sought to identify robust indicators that would enable precision targeting of these snails. At the site of the world’s largest recorded schistosomiasis epidemic—the Lower Senegal River Basin in Senegal—intensive sampling revealed positive relationships...

Registration Year

  • 2019
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Affiliations

  • University of Notre Dame
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