533 Works

Data from: Large-scale parentage analysis reveals reproductive patterns and heritability of spawn timing in a hatchery population of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Alicia Abadía-Cardoso, Eric C. Anderson, Devon E. Pearse, John Carlos Garza & John Carlos Garza
Understanding life history traits is an important first step in formulating effective conservation and management strategies. The use of artificial propagation and supplementation as such a strategy can have numerous effects on the supplemented natural populations and minimizing life history divergence is crucial in minimizing these effects. Here, we use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes for large-scale parentage analysis and pedigree reconstruction in a hatchery population of steelhead, the anadromous form of rainbow trout. Nearly...

Data from: Limits to behavioral evolution: the quantitative genetics of a complex trait under directional selection

Vincent Careau, Matthew E. Wolak, Patrick A. Carter, Garland Jr., Theodore & Theodore Garland
Replicated selection experiments provide a powerful way to study how “multiple adaptive solutions” may lead to differences in the quantitative-genetic architecture of selected traits and whether this may translate into differences in the timing at which evolutionary limits are reached. We analyze data from 31 generations (n = 17,988) of selection on voluntary wheel running in house mice. The rate of initial response, timing of selection limit, and height of the plateau varied significantly between...

Data from: Increased accuracy of species lists developed for alpine lakes using morphology and cytochrome oxidase I for identification of specimens

Kristy Deiner, Roland A. Knapp, Daniel M. Boiano & Bernie May
The first step in many community ecology studies is to produce a species list from a sample of individuals. Community ecologists now have two viable ways of producing a species list: morphological and barcode identification. In this study, we compared the taxonomic resolution gained by a combined use of both methods and tested whether a change in taxonomic resolution significantly impacted richness estimates for benthic macroinvertebrates sampled from ten lakes in Sequoia National Park, USA....

Data from: The role of inbreeding depression and mating system in the evolution of heterostyly

Jennifer J. Weber, Stephen G. Weller, Ann K. Sakai, Olga V. Tsyusko, Travis C. Glenn, Cesar A. Dominguez, Francisco E. Molina-Freaner, Juan Fornoni, Mike Tran, Nhu Nguyen, Karen Nguyen, Lien-Khuong Tran, Greg Joice & Ellen Harding
We investigated the role of morph-based differences in the expression of inbreeding depression in loss of the mid-styled morph from populations of tristylous Oxalis alpina as proposed by theoretical analyses. The extent of self-compatibility of reproductive morphs, the degree of self-fertilization, and the magnitude of inbreeding depression were investigated in three populations of O. alpina differing in their tristylous incompatibility relationships. All three populations exhibited significant inbreeding depression. In two populations with highly modified tristylous...

Data from: Quantifying past and present connectivity illuminates a rapidly changing landscape for the African elephant

Clinton W. Epps, Samuel K. Wasser, Jonah L. Keim, Benezeth M. Mutayoba & Justin S. Brashares
There is widespread concern about impacts of land-use change on connectivity among animal and plant populations, but those impacts are difficult to quantify. Moreover, lack of knowledge regarding ecosystems before fragmentation may obscure appropriate conservation targets. We use occurrence and population genetic data to contrast connectivity for a long-lived mega-herbivore over historical and contemporary time frames. We test whether (i) historical gene flow is predicted by persistent landscape features rather than human settlement, (ii) contemporary...

Data from: Crossing the uncrossable: novel trans-valley biogeographic patterns revealed in the genetic history of low dispersal mygalomorph spiders (Antrodiaetidae, Antrodiaetus) from California

Marshal Hedin, James Starrett & Cheryl Hayashi
Antrodiaetus riversi is a dispersal-limited, habitat specialized mygalomorph spider species endemic to mesic woodlands of northern and central California. Here we build upon prior phylogeographic research using a much larger geographic sample and include additional nuclear genes, providing more detailed biogeographic insights throughout the range of this complex. Of particular interest is the uncovering of unexpected and replicated trans-valley biogeographic patterns, where in two separate genetic clades western haplotypes in the California south Coast Ranges...

Data from: The interplay among intraspecific leaf trait variation, niche breadth and species abundance along light and soil nutrient gradients

Alex Fajardo & Andrew Siefert
It is assumed that widespread, generalist species have high phenotypic variation, but we know little about how intraspecific trait variation (ITV) relates to species abundance and niche breadth. In the temperate rainforest of southern Chile, we hypothesized that species with wide niche breadth would exhibit 1) high among-plot ITV, 2) a strong relationship between trait values and the environment, and 3) a close fit between traits and local environment trait optima. We measured leaf functional...

Data from: Adaptive radiation in labrid fishes: a central role for functional innovations during 65 My of relentless diversification

Edward D. Burress & Peter C. Wainwright
Early burst patterns of diversification have become closely linked with concepts of adaptive radiation, reflecting interest in the role of ecological opportunity in modulating diversification. But, this model has not been widely explored on coral reefs, where biodiversity is exceptional, but many lineages have high dispersal capabilities and a pan-tropical distribution. We analyze adaptive radiation in labrid fishes, arguably the most ecologically dominant and diverse radiation of fishes on coral reefs. We test for time-dependent...

Data from: Phenotypic integration between claw and toepad traits promotes microhabitat specialization in the Anolis adaptive radiation

Michael L Yuan, Marvalee H Wake, Ian J Wang, Michael L. Yuan, Marvalee H. Wake & Ian J. Wang
The performance of an organism in its environment frequently depends more on its composite phenotype than on individual phenotypic traits. Thus, understanding environmental adaptation requires investigating patterns of covariation across functionally-related traits. The replicated adaptive radiations of Greater Antillean Anolis lizards are characterized by ecological and morphological convergence, thus providing an opportunity to examine the role of multiple phenotypes in microhabitat adaptation. Here, we examine integrated claw and toepad morphological evolution in relation to habitat...

Data from: Modelling the functional link between movement, feeding activity and condition in a marine predator

Enrico Pirotta, Lisa K. Schwarz, Daniel P. Costa, Patrick W. Robinson, Leslie New, Daniel P Costa, Patrick W Robinson & Lisa K Schwarz
The ability to quantify animals’ feeding activity and the resulting changes in their body condition as they move in the environment is fundamental to our understanding of a population’s ecology. We use satellite tracking data from northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), paired with simultaneous diving information, to develop a Bayesian state-space model that concurrently estimates an individual’s location, feeding activity, and changes in condition. The model identifies important foraging areas and times, the relative amount...

Data from: Patterns of transposable element variation and clinality in Drosophila

Jeffrey R. Adrion, David J. Begun & Matthew W. Hahn
Natural populations often exist in spatially diverse environments and may experience variation in the strength and targets of natural selection across their ranges. Drosophila provides an excellent opportunity to study the effects of spatially varying selection in natural populations, as both D. melanogaster and D. simulans live across a wide range of environments in North America. Here, we characterize patterns of variation in transposable elements (TEs) from six populations of D. melanogaster and nine populations...

Data from: Increased evolutionary rates and conserved transcriptional response following allopolyploidisation in brown algae

Filipe Sousa, João Neiva, Neusa Martins, Rita Jacinto, Laura Anderson, Peter T. Raimondi, Ester A. Serrao & Gareth A. Pearson
Genome mergers between independently evolving lineages, via allopolyploidy, can potentially lead to instantaneous sympatric speciation. However, little is known about the consequences of allopolyploidy and the resultant “genome shock” on genome evolution and expression beyond the plant and fungal branches of the Tree of Life. The aim of this study was to compare substitution rates and gene expression patterns in two allopolyploid brown algae (Phaeophyceae, Heterokonta) and their progenitors in the genus Pelvetiopsis N.L. Gardner...

Data from: Apparent inbreeding preference despite inbreeding depression in the American crow

Andrea K. Townsend, Conor C. Taff, Melissa L. Jones, Katherine H. Getman, Sarah S. Wheeler, Mitch G. Hinton & Ryane M. Logsdon
Although matings between relatives can have negative effects on offspring fitness, apparent inbreeding preference has been reported in a growing number of systems, including those with documented inbreeding depression. Here, we examined evidence for inbreeding depression and inbreeding preference in two populations (Clinton, New York and Davis, California, USA) of the cooperatively breeding American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos). We then compared observed inbreeding strategies with theoretical expectations for optimal, adaptive levels of inbreeding, given the inclusive...

Data from: Retracing the Hawaiian silversword radiation despite phylogenetic, biogeographic, and paleogeographic uncertainty

Michael J. Landis, William A. Freyman & Bruce G. Baldwin
The Hawaiian silversword alliance (Asteraceae) is an iconic adaptive radiation. However, like many island plant lineages, no fossils have been assigned to the clade. As a result, the clade's age and diversification rate are not known precisely, making it difficult to test biogeographic hypotheses about the radiation. Without fossils, paleogeographically structured biogeographic processes may inform species divergence times; for example, an island must first exist for a clade to radiate upon it. We date the...

Data from: Population genomics through time provides insights into the consequences of decline and rapid demographic recovery through head-starting in a Galapagos giant tortoise

Evelyn L. Jensen, Danielle L. Edwards, Ryan C. Garrick, Joshua M. Miller, James P. Gibbs, Linda J. Cayot, Washington Tapia, Aldalgisa Caccone, Michael A. Russello & Adalgisa Caccone
Population genetic theory related to the consequences of rapid population decline is well-developed, but there are very few empirical studies where sampling was conducted before and after a known bottleneck event. Such knowledge is of particular importance for species restoration, given links between genetic diversity and the probability of long-term persistence. To directly evaluate the relationship between current genetic diversity and past demographic events, we collected genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data from pre-bottleneck historical (c.1906)...

Data from: Genome-wide assessment of diversity and divergence among extant Galápagos giant tortoise species

Joshua M. Miller, Maud C. Quinzin, Danielle L. Edwards, Deren A.R. Eaton, Evelyn L. Jensen, Michael A. Russello, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Danny Rueda, Adalgisa Caccone, James P Gibbs, Joshua M Miller, Maud C Quinzin, Deren A R Eaton, Danielle L Edwards, Evelyn L Jensen & Michael A Russello
Genome-wide assessments allow for fuller characterization of genetic diversity, finer-scale population delineation, and better detection of demographically significant units to guide conservation compared to those based on “traditional” markers. Galapagos giant tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) have long provided a case study for how evolutionary genetics may be applied to advance species conservation. Ongoing efforts to bolster tortoise populations, which have declined by 90%, have been informed by analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequence and microsatellite genotypic data,...

Data from: Ecological correlates of the spatial co-occurrence of sympatric mammalian carnivores worldwide

Courtney L. Davis, Lindsey N. Rich, Zach J. Farris, Marcella J. Kelly, Mario S. Di Bitetti, Yamil Di Blanco, Sebastian Albanesi, Mohammad S. Farhadinia, Navid Gholikhani, Sandra Hamel, Bart J. Harmsen, Claudia Wultsch, Mamadou D. Kane, Quinton Martins, Asia J. Murphy, Robin Steenweg, S. Sunarto, Atieh Taktehrani, Kanchan Thapa, Jody M. Tucker, Jesse Whittington, Febri A. Widodo, Nigel G. Yoccoz, David A.W. Miller & Yamil Di Blanco
The composition of local mammalian carnivore communities has far-reaching effects on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. To better understand how carnivore communities are structured, we analyzed camera trap data for 108,087 trap days across 12 countries spanning 5 continents. We estimate local probabilities of co-occurrence among 768 species pairs from the order Carnivora and evaluate how shared ecological traits correlated with probabilities of co-occurrence. Within individual study areas, species pairs co-occurred more frequently than expected at random....

Data from: Eyes wide shut: the impact of dim-light vision on neural investment in marine teleosts

Teresa L. Iglesias, Alex Dornburg, Dan L. Warren, Peter C. Wainwright, Lars Schmitz & Evan P. Economo
Understanding how organismal design evolves in response to environmental challenges is a central goal of evolutionary biology. In particular, assessing the extent to which environmental requirements drive general design features among distantly related groups is a major research question. The visual system is a critical sensory apparatus that evolves in response to changing light regimes. In vertebrates, the optic tectum is the primary visual processing center of the brain, and yet it is unclear how,...

Data from: Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, dominance drive, and sex-chromosome introgression at secondary contact zones: a simulation study

Luca Sciuchetti, Christophe Dufresnes, Elisa Cavoto, Alan Brelsford & Nicolas Perrin
Dobzhansky-Muller (DM) incompatibilities involving sex chromosomes have been proposed to account for Haldane’s rule (lowered fitness among hybrid offspring of the heterogametic sex) as well as Darwin’s corollary (asymmetric fitness costs with respect to the direction of the cross). We performed simulation studies of a hybrid zone to investigate the effects of different types of DM incompatibilities on cline widths and positions of sex-linked markers. From our simulations, X-Y incompatibilities generate steep clines for both...

Data from: Identification of a transporter complex responsible for the cytosolic entry of nitrogen-containing-bisphosphonates

Zhou Yu, Lauren E. Surface, Chong Yon Park, Max A Horlbeck, Gregory A Wyant, Monther Abu-Remaileh, Timothy R. Peterson, David M. Sabatini, Jonathan S. Weissman, Erin K. O'Shea, Lauren E Surface, Erin K O'Shea, David M Sabatini, Jonathan S Weissman & Timothy R Peterson
Nitrogen-containing-bisphosphonates (N-BPs) are widely prescribed to treat osteoporosis and other bone-related diseases. Although previous studies established that N-BPs function by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway in osteoclasts, the mechanism by which N-BPs enter the cytosol from the extracellular space to reach their molecular target is not understood. Here we implemented a CRISPRi-mediated genome-wide screen and identified SLC37A3 (solute carrier family 37 member A3) as a gene required for the action of N-BPs in mammalian cells. We...

Data from: Habitat structure modifies microclimate: an approach for mapping fine-scale thermal refuge

Charlotte R. Milling, Janet L. Rachlow, Peter J. Olsoy, Mark A. Chappell, Timothy R. Johnson, Jennifer S. Forbey, Lisa A. Shipley & Daniel H. Thornton
1. Contemporary techniques predicting habitat suitability under climate change projections often underestimate availability of thermal refuges. Habitat structure contributes to thermal heterogeneity at a variety of spatial scales, but quantifying microclimates at organism‐relevant resolutions remains a challenge. Landscapes that appear homogeneous at large scales may offer patchily distributed thermal refuges at finer scales. 2. We quantified the relationship between vegetation structure and the thermal environment at a scale relevant to small, terrestrial animals using a...

Data from: Sympatric serpentine endemic Monardella (Lamiaceae) species maintain habitat differences despite hybridization

Kathleen M. Kay, Suzie Woolhouse, Brett A. Smith, Nathaniel S. Pope & Nishanta Rajakaruna
Ecological differentiation and genetic isolation are thought to be critical in facilitating coexistence between related species, but the relative importance of these phenomena, and the interactions between them, are not well understood. Here we examine divergence in abiotic habitat affinity and the extent of hybridization and introgression between two rare species of Monardella (Lamiaceae) that are both restricted to the same serpentine soil exposure in California. Although broadly sympatric, they are found in microhabitats that...

Data from: The evolution of diapause in Rivulus (Laimosemion)

Andrew I. Furness, David N. Reznick, Andrey Tatarenkov, John C. Avise, David N Reznick, Andrew I Furness & John C Avise
Annual killifish adapted to life in aquatic habitat that seasonally dries have evolved desiccation resistant eggs capable of undergoing diapause, developmental arrest, at specific stages during embryology. Although noted for their remarkable abilities to live at the land-water interface, species in the genus Rivulus are considered non-annual killifish exhibiting typical teleost development patterns and no embryonic diapause. Here, we combine a molecular phylogeny with embryological study to demonstrate an independent origin of mid-embryonic diapause within...

Data from: Along the speciation continuum: quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic isolating barriers across five million years of evolutionary divergence in California jewelflowers

Kyle Christie & Sharon Y. Strauss
Understanding the relative roles of intrinsic and extrinsic reproductive barriers, and their interplay within the geographic context of diverging taxa, remains an outstanding challenge in the study of speciation. We conducted a comparative analysis of reproductive isolation in California Jewelflowers (Streptanthus, s.l., Brassicaceae) by quantifying potential barriers to gene flow at multiple life history stages in 39 species pairs spanning five million years of evolutionary divergence. We quantified nine potential pre- and postzygotic barriers and...

Data from: Stream flow alone does not predict population structure of diving beetles across complex tropical landscapes

Athena Lam, Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint, Carolin Kindler, Matthew H. Van Dam, Rawati Panjaitan, George K. Roderick & Michael Balke
Recent theoretical advances have hypothesized a central role of habitat persistence on population genetic structure and resulting biodiversity patterns of freshwater organisms. Here, we address the hypothesis that lotic species, or lineages adapted to comparably geologically stable running water habitats (streams and their marginal habitats), have high levels of endemicity and phylogeographic structure due to the persistent nature of their habitat. We use a nextRAD sequencing approach to investigate the population structure and phylogeography of...

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