281 Works

Data from: Social networks predict gut microbiome composition in wild baboons

Jenny Tung, Luis B. Barriero, Michael B. Burns, J. C. Grenier, Josh Lynch, L. E. Grieneisen, J. Altmann, S. C. Alberts, R. Blekhman, E. A. Archie, Laura E Grieneisen, Elizabeth A Archie, Susan C Alberts, Jeanne Altmann, Luis B Barreiro, Jean-Christophe Grenier, Michael B Burns & Ran Blekhman
Social relationships have profound effects on health in humans and other primates, but the mechanisms that explain this relationship are not well understood. Using shotgun metagenomic data from wild baboons, we found that social group membership and social network relationships predicted both the taxonomic structure of the gut microbiome and the structure of genes encoded by gut microbial species. Rates of interaction directly explained variation in the gut microbiome, even after controlling for diet, kinship,...

Data from: Hosts of avian brood parasites have evolved egg signatures with elevated information content

Eleanor M. Caves, Martin Stevens, Edwin S. Iversen & Claire N. Spottiswoode
Hosts of brood-parasitic birds must distinguish their own eggs from parasitic mimics, or pay the cost of mistakenly raising a foreign chick. Egg discrimination is easier when different host females of the same species each lay visually distinctive eggs (egg ‘signatures’), which helps to foil mimicry by parasites. Here, we ask whether brood parasitism is associated with lower levels of correlation between different egg traits in hosts, making individual host signatures more distinctive and informative....

Data from: The evolutionary history of ferns inferred from 25 low-copy nuclear genes

Carl J. Rothfels, Fay-Wei Li, Erin M. Sigel, Layne Huiet, Anders Larsson, Dylan O. Burge, Markus Ruhsam, Michael Deyholos, Douglas E. Soltis, , Shane W. Shaw, Lisa Pokorny, Tao Chen, Claude DePamphilis, Lisa DeGironimo, Li Chen, Xiaofeng Wei, Xiao Sun, Petra Korall, Dennis W. Stevenson, Sean W. Graham, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Kathleen M. Pryer, C. Neal Stewart, Gane K-S. Wong … & Claude De Pamphilis
Premise of the study: Understanding fern (monilophyte) phylogeny and its evolutionary timescale is critical for broad investigations of the evolution of land plants, and for providing the point of comparison necessary for studying the evolution of the fern sister group, seed plants. Molecular phylogenetic investigations have revolutionized our understanding of fern phylogeny, however, to date, these studies have relied almost exclusively on plastid data. Methods: Here we take a curated phylogenomics approach to infer the...

Data from: Genome-wide investigation of adaptation to harmful algal blooms in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

Kristina M. Cammen, Thomas F. Schultz, Patricia E. Rosel, Randall S. Wells & Andrew J. Read
Harmful algal blooms (HABs), which can be lethal in marine species and cause illness in humans, are increasing worldwide. In the Gulf of Mexico, HABs of Karenia brevis produce neurotoxic brevetoxins that cause large-scale marine mortality events. The long history of such blooms, combined with the potentially severe effects of exposure, may have produced a strong selective pressure for evolved resistance. Advances in next-generation sequencing, in particular genotyping-by-sequencing, greatly enable the genomic study of such...

Data from: The importance of spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) resting habitat: implications for management

Julian A. Tyne, David W. Johnston, Robert Rankin, Neil R. Loneragan & Lars Bejder
Linking key ecological characteristics with animal behaviour is essential for identifying and protecting important habitats that support life functions. Spinner dolphins display a predictable diurnal behavioural pattern where they forage offshore at night and return to sheltered bays during daytime to rest. These bays, which are also subject to considerable use by humans, have long been recognized as key habitats for this species although the extent to which dolphins rely on specific characteristics of these...

Data from: The socio-genetics of a complex society: female gelada relatedness patterns mirror association patterns in a multi-level society.

Noah Snyder-Mackler, Susan C. Alberts & Thore J. Bergman
Multilevel societies with fission–fusion dynamics—arguably the most complex animal societies—are defined by two or more nested levels of organization. The core of these societies are modular social units that regularly fission and fuse with one another. Despite convergent evolution in disparate taxa, we know strikingly little about how such societies form and how fitness benefits operate. Understanding the kinship structure of complex societies could inform us about the origins of the social structure as well...

Data from: Estimating tempo and mode of Y chromosome turnover: explaining Y chromosome loss with the fragile Y hypothesis

Heath Blackmon & Jeffery P. Demuth
Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems....

Data from: Competition for hummingbird pollination shapes flower color variation in Andean Solanaceae

Nathan Muchhala, Sönke Johnsen & Stacey Dewitt Smith
One classic explanation for the remarkable diversity of flower colors across angiosperms involves evolutionary shifts among different types of pollinators with different color preferences. However, the pollinator shift model fails to account for the many examples of color variation within clades that share the same pollination system. An alternate explanation is the competition model, which suggests that color divergence evolves in response to interspecific competition for pollinators, as a means to decrease interspecific pollinator movements....

Data from: Divergent population structure and climate associations of a chromosomal inversion polymorphism across the Mimulus guttatus species complex

Elen Oneal, David B. Lowry, Kevin M. Wright, Zhirui Zhu & John H. Willis
Chromosomal rearrangement polymorphisms are common and increasingly found to be associated with adaptive ecological divergence and speciation. Rearrangements, such as inversions, reduce recombination in heterozygous individuals and thus can protect favorable allelic combinations at linked loci, facilitating their spread in the presence of gene flow. Recently, we identified a chromosomal inversion polymorphism that contributes to ecological adaptation and reproductive isolation between annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus. Here we evaluate the...

Data from: Classification tree methods provide a multifactorial approach to predicting insular body size evolution in rodents

Paul A. P. Durst, V. Louise Roth & V. Louise Roth
Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain size changes in insular mammals, but no single variable suffices to explain the diversity of responses, particularly within Rodentia. Here in a dataset on insular rodents we observe strong consistency in the direction of size change within islands and within species, but (outside of Heteromyidae) little consistency at broader taxonomic scales. Using traits of islands and of species in a classification-tree analysis we find the most important factor...

Data from: Long-term data reveal patterns and controls on streamwater chemistry in a forested stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee

Brian D. Lutz, Patrick J. Mulholland & Emily S. Bernhardt
We present 20 years of weekly streamwater chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a ~1.0˚C increase in mean annual temperature, a ~20% decline in precipitation, and a ~30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, runoff has declined by ~34%. We evaluate long-term trends in streamwater concentrations and fluxes for 9 solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate...

Data from: Inferring the history of interchromosomal gene transposition in Drosophila using n-Dimensional parsimony

Mira V. Han & Matthew W. Hahn
Gene transposition puts a new gene copy in a novel genomic environment. Moreover, genes moving between the autosomes and the X chromosome experience change in several evolutionary parameters. Previous studies of gene transposition have not utilized the phylogenetic framework that becomes possible with the availability of whole genomes from multiple species. Here we used parsimonious reconstruction on the genomic distribution of gene families to analyze interchromosomal gene transposition in Drosophila. We identified 782 genes that...

Data from: Unraveling the determinants of insular body size shifts

Craig R. McClain, Paul A. P. Durst, Alison G. Boyer, Clinton D. Francis, P. A. P. Durst, A. G. Boyer, C. D. Francis & C. R. McClain
The island rule, a pattern of size shifts on islands, is an oft-cited but little understood phenomenon of evolutionary biology. Here we explore the evolutionary mechanisms behind the rule in 184 mammal species, testing climatic, ecological, and phylogenetic hypotheses in a robust quantitative framework. Our findings confirm the importance of species’ ecological traits in determining both the strength and the direction of body size changes on islands. Although the island rule pattern appears relatively weak...

Data from: Female competition in chimpanzees

Anne E. Pusey, Kara Schroepfer-Walker, A. E. Pusey & K. Schroepfer-Walker
Female chimpanzees exhibit exceptionally slow rates of reproduction and raise their offspring without direct paternal care. Therefore, their reproductive success depends critically on long-term access to high-quality food resources over a long lifespan. Chimpanzee communities contain multiple adult males, multiple adult females and their offspring. Because males are philopatric and jointly defend the community range while most females transfer to new communities before breeding, adult females are typically surrounded by unrelated competitors. Communities are fission–fusion...

Data from: Combining genetic and demographic information to prioritize conservation efforts for anadromous alewife and blueback herring

Eric P. Palkovacs, Daniel J. Hasselman, Emily E. Argo, Stephen R. Gephard, Karin E. Limburg, David M. Post, Thomas F. Schultz & Theodore V. Willis
A major challenge in conservation biology is the need to broadly prioritize conservation efforts when demographic data are limited. One method to address this challenge is to use population genetic data to define groups of populations linked by migration and then use demographic information from monitored populations to draw inferences about the status of unmonitored populations within those groups. We applied this method to anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis), species for...

Data from: Predictability and irreversibility of genetic changes associated with flower color evolution in Penstemon barbatus

Carolyn A. Wessinger & Mark D. Rausher
Two outstanding questions in evolutionary biology are whether, and how often, the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution is predictable; and whether genetic change constrains evolutionary reversibility. We address these questions by studying the genetic basis of red flower color in Penstemon barbatus. The production of red flowers often involves the inactivation of one or both of two anthocyanin pathway genes, Flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'h) and Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'h). We used gene expression and enzyme function assays...

Data from: Role of grooming in reducing tick load in wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus)

Mercy Y. Akinyi, Susan C. Alberts, Jeanne Altmann, Nilesh B. Patel, Jenny Tung & Maamun Jeneby
Nonhuman primate species spend a conspicuous amount of time grooming during social interactions, a behaviour that probably serves both social and health-related functions. While the social implications of grooming have been relatively well studied, less attention has been paid to the health benefits, especially the removal of ectoparasites, which may act as vectors in disease transmission. In this study, we examined whether grooming behaviour reduced tick load (number of ticks) and haemoprotozoan infection status in...

Data from: Chimpanzees breed with genetically dissimilar mates

Kara K. Walker, Rebecca S. Rudicell, Yingying Li, Beatrice H. Hahn, Emily Wroblewski & Anne E. Pusey
Inbreeding adversely affects fitness, whereas heterozygosity often augments it. Therefore, mechanisms to avoid inbreeding and increase genetic distance between mates should be advantageous in species where adult relatives reside together. Here we investigate mate choice for genetic dissimilarity in chimpanzees, a species in which many females avoid inbreeding through dispersal, but where promiscuous mating and sexual coercion can limit choice when related adults reside together. We take advantage of incomplete female dispersal in Gombe National...

Data from: The quick and the dead: microbial demography at the yeast thermal limit

Colin S. Maxwell & Paul M. Magwene
The niche of microorganisms is determined by where their populations can expand. Populations can fail to grow because of high death or low birth rates, but these are challenging to measure in microorganisms. We developed a novel technique that enables single cell measurement of age-structured birth and death rates in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and used this method to study responses to heat stress in a genetically diverse panel of strains. We find that...

Data from: Natural enemies govern ecosystem resilience in the face of extreme droughts

Qiang He, Brian Silliman, Zezheng Liu, Baoshan Cui & Brian R. Silliman
Severe droughts are on the rise in many regions. But thus far, attempts to predict when drought will cause a major regime shift or when ecosystems are resilient, often using plant drought tolerance models, have been frustrated. Here we show that pressure from natural enemies regulates an ecosystem’s resilience to severe droughts. Field experiments revealed that in protected salt marshes experiencing a severe drought, planting-eating grazers eliminated drought-stressed vegetation that could otherwise survive and recover...

Data from: Can asexuality confer a short term advantage? Investigating apparent biogeographic success in the apomictic triploid fern Myriopteris gracilis

David A. Wickell, Michael D. Windham, Xiaofei Wang, Stuart J. Macdonald & James B. Beck
Premise of the study: Although asexual taxa are generally seen as evolutionary dead ends, asexuality appears to provide a short-term benefit in some taxa, including a wider geographic distribution compared to sexual relatives. However, this may be an illusion created by multiple, morphologically cryptic, asexual lineages, each occupying a relatively small area. In this study we investigate the role of multiple lineages in the biogeography of Myriopteris gracilis Fée (Pteridaceae), a North American apomictic triploid...

Data from: Biogeographic consequences of nutrient enrichment for plant-herbivore interactions in coastal wetlands

Qiang He & Brian R. Silliman
A major challenge in ecology is to understand broadscale trends in the impact of environmental change. We provide the first integrative analysis of the effects of eutrophication on plants, herbivores, and their interactions in coastal wetlands across latitudes. We show that fertilisation strongly increases herbivory in salt marshes, but not in mangroves, and that this effect increases with increasing latitude in salt marshes. We further show that stronger nutrient effects on plant nitrogen concentration at...

Data from: Costs of resistance and correlational selection in the multiple-herbivore community of Solanum carolinense

Michael Joseph Wise, Mark D. Rausher & Michael J. Wise
Although a central assumption of most plant-defense theories is that resistance is costly, fitness costs have proven difficult to detect in the field. One useful, though labor-intensive, method to detect costs is to quantify stabilizing selection acting on resistance in field populations. Here, we report on an experimental field study of Solanum carolinense in which we employed a quadratic phenotypic-selection analysis on 12 types of resistance (defined operationally as one minus the proportion of tissue...

Data from: The impacts of oil palm on recent deforestation and biodiversity loss

Varsha Vijay, Stuart L. Pimm, Clinton N. Jenkins & Sharon J. Smith
Palm oil is the most widely traded vegetable oil globally, with demand projected to increase substantially in the future. Almost all oil palm grows in areas that were once tropical moist forests, some of them quite recently. The conversion to date, and future expansion, threatens biodiversity and increases greenhouse gas emissions. Today, consumer pressure is pushing companies toward deforestation-free sources of palm oil. To guide interventions aimed at reducing tropical deforestation due to oil palm,...

Data from: Basking behavior predicts the evolution of heat tolerance in Australian rainforest lizards

Martha M. Muñoz, Gary M. Langham, Matthew C. Brandley, Dan Rosauer, Stephen E. Williams, Craig Moritz & Dan F. Rosauer
There is pressing urgency to understand how tropical ectotherms can behaviorally and physiologically respond to climate warming. We examine how basking behavior and thermal environment interact to influence evolutionary variation in thermal physiology of multiple species of lygosomine rainforest skinks from the Wet Tropics of northeastern Queensland, Australia (AWT). These tropical lizards are behaviorally specialized to exploit canopy or sun, and are distributed across steep thermal clines in the AWT. Using phylogenetic analyses, we demonstrate...

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