21 Works

Beyond the landscape: resistance modelling infers physical and behavioural gene flow barriers to a mobile carnivore across a metropolitan area

Sophia Kimmig, Joscha Beninde, Myriam Brandt, Anna Schleimer, Stephanie Kramer-Schadt, Heribert Hofer, Konstantin Börner, Christoph Schulze, Ulrich Wittstatt, Mike Heddergott, Tania Halczok, Christoph Staubach & Alain Frantz
Urbanization affects key aspects of wildlife ecology. Dispersal in urban wildlife species may be impacted by geographical barriers but also by a species’ inherent behavioural variability. There are no functional connectivity analyses using continuous individual-based sampling across an urban-rural continuum that would allow a thorough assessment of the relative importance of physical and behavioural dispersal barriers. We used 16 microsatellite loci to genotype 374 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from the city of Berlin and surrounding...

Data from: Genetic Monogamy despite frequent extra-pair Copulations in “strictly monogamous” wild Jackdaws

Lisa Gill, Jaap Van Schaik, Auguste Von Bayern & Manfred Gahr
“Monogamy” refers to different components of pair exclusiveness: the social pair, sexual partners, and the genetic outcome of sexual encounters. Avian monogamy is usually defined socially or genetically, while quantifications of sexual behavior remain scarce. Jackdaws (Corvus monedula) are considered a rare example of strict monogamy in songbirds, with lifelong pair bonds and little genetic evidence for extra-pair offspring. Yet jackdaw copulations, although accompanied by loud copulation calls, are rarely observed, since they occur visually...

Data from: Cardiomyocyte mechanodynamics under conditions of actin remodelling

Ricardo H. Pires, Nithya Shree, Emmanuel Manu, Ewa Guzniczak & Oliver Otto
The mechanical performance of cardiomyocytes is an important indicator of their maturation state and of primary importance for the development of therapies based on cardiac stem-cells. As the mechanical analysis of adherent cells at high-throughput remains challenging, we explore the applicability of real-time deformability cytometry (RT-DC) to probe cardiomyocytes in suspension. RT-DC is a microfluidic technology allowing for real-time mechanical analysis of thousands of cells with a throughput exceeding 1,000 cells per second. For cardiomyocytes...

Data from: Bat overpasses: an insufficient solution to restore habitat connectivity across roads

Fabien Claireau, Yves Bas, Sébastien J. Puechmaille, Jean-François Julien, Benjamin Allegrini & Christian Kerbiriou
1. Roads have many negative effects on wildlife, including their role in habitat fragmentation. Habitat fragmentation affects bats during their daily movements between roosts and foraging areas. As bats are protected in Europe, developers must implement specific mitigation measures that are hierarchically structured to achieve a null net impact. However, very few specific mitigation measures have been undertaken specifically for bats. Bat overpasses are among proposed improvements intended to reduce the impact of roads, but...

Data from: Modelling landscape connectivity for greater horseshoe bat using an empirical quantification of resistance

David Pinaud, Fabien Claireau, Maxime Leuchtmann & Christian Kerbiriou
1. Habitat fragmentation and isolation as a result of human activities have been recognized as great threats to population viability. Evaluating landscape connectivity in order to identify and protect linkages has therefore become a key challenge in applied ecology and conservation. 2. One useful approach to evaluate connectivity is Least-Cost Path (LCP) analysis. However, several studies have highlighted importance of parameterization with empirical, biologically-relevant proxies of factors affecting movements, as well as the need to...

Data from: Complex migration and breeding strategies in an elusive bird species illuminated by genetic and isotopic markers

Nina Seifert, Martin Haase, Steven L. Van Wilgenburg, Christian C. Voigt & Angela Schmitz Ornés
Unlike the annual bi-directional movements of over 200 bird species within the Palaearctic–Afrotropical region, irregular movements such as irruptive migration with a low degree of philopatry are reported for a variety of species depending on highly seasonal and unpredictable resources. These flexible movements allow for itinerant breeding – consecutive breeding attempts in two or more geographically different regions during the same annual reproductive cycle. In order to illuminate migratory and breeding strategies of the erratic...

Data from: Effects of temperature and drought on early life stages in three species of butterflies: mortality of early life stages as a key determinant of vulnerability to climate change?

Michael Klockmann & Klaus Fischer
Anthropogenic climate change poses substantial challenges to biodiversity conservation. Well-documented responses include phenological and range shifts, and declines in cold but increases in warm-adapted species. Thus, some species will suffer while others will benefit from ongoing change, although the biological features determining the prospects of a given species under climate change are largely unknown. By comparing three related butterfly species of different vulnerability to climate change, we show that stress tolerance during early development may...

Data from: Diversity and palaeoecology of the enigmatic genus Knebelia (Eucrustacea, Decapoda, Eryonidae) from Upper Jurassic plattenkalks in southern Germany

Denis Audo, Günter Schweigert, Joachim T. Haug, Carolin Haug, Jean-Paul Saint Martin & Sylvain Charbonnier
For a long time, the genus Knebelia Van Straelen, 1922 has comprised two species of eryonid lobster, K. bilobata (Münster, 1839) and K. schuberti (Meyer, 1836), both recorded exclusively from Late Jurassic Lagerstätten in southern Germany. Recently, the latter has been suggested to represent a juvenile individual of Cycleryon propinquus (Schlotheim, 1822). A re-examination of the type and new material has led to our rejection of that interpretation and confirmation of assignment of this species...

Data from: Ecological outsourcing: a pitcher plant benefits from transferring pre-digestion of prey to a bat mutualist

Caroline R. Schöner, Michael G. Schöner, T. Ulmar Grafe, Charles M. Clarke, Linda Dombrowski, Moi Chan Tan & Gerald Kerth
Mutualisms are interspecific interactions where each of the species involved gains net benefits from the other(s). The exchange of resources and/or services between mutualistic partners often involves tasks that species originally accomplished themselves but which have been taken over by or transferred to the more efficient partner during the evolution of the mutualism. Such ‘ecological outsourcing’ can be seen, for example, in several carnivorous plants that have transferred prey capture and digestion to animal partners....

Data from: Indirect genetic effects and sexual conflicts: Partner genotype influences multiple morphological and behavioural reproductive traits in a flatworm

Lucas Marie-Orleach, Nadja Vogt-Burri, Pierick Mouginot, Aline Schlatter, Dita B. Vizoso, Nathan W. Bailey & Lukas Schärer
The expression of an individual's phenotypic traits can be influenced by genes expressed in its social partners. Theoretical models predict that such indirect genetic effects (IGEs) on reproductive traits should play an important role in determining the evolutionary outcome of sexual conflict. However, empirical tests of (i) whether reproductive IGEs exist, (ii) how they vary among genotypes, and (iii) whether they are uniform for different types of reproductive traits are largely lacking. We addressed this...

Data from: Carried over: heat stress in the egg stage reduces subsequent performance in a butterfly

Michael Klockmann, Friederike Kleinschmidt & Klaus Fischer
Increasing heat stress caused by anthropogenic climate change may pose a substantial challenge to biodiversity due to associated detrimental effects on survival and reproduction. Therefore, heat tolerance has recently received substantial attention, but its variation throughout ontogeny and effects carried over from one developmental stage to another remained largely neglected. To explore to what extent stress experienced early in life affects later life stages, we here investigate effects of heat stress experienced in the egg...

Data from: Adaptive phenotypic plasticity in a clonal invader

Gerlien Verhaegen, Kyle E. McElroy, Laura Bankers, Maurine Neiman & Martin Haase
Organisms featuring wide trait variability and occurring in a wide range of habitats, such as the ovoviviparous freshwater New Zealand snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, are ideal models to study adaptation. Since the mid-19th century, P. antipodarum, characterized by extremely variable shell morphology, has successfully invaded aquatic areas on four continents. Because these obligately and wholy asexual invasive populations harbor low genetic diversity compared to mixed sexual/asexual populations in the native range, we hypothesized that 1) this...

Data from: Effects of inbreeding and temperature stress on life history and immune function in a butterfly

Kristin Franke, Klaus Fischer, K. Franke & K. Fischer
Theory predicts that inbreeding depression should be more pronounced under environmental stress due to an increase in the expression of recessive deleterious alleles. If so, inbred populations may be especially vulnerable to environmental change. Against this background we here investigate effects of inbreeding, temperature stress and its interactions with inbreeding in the tropical butterfly Bicyclus anynana. We use a full-factorial design with three levels of inbreeding (F = 0 / 0.25 / 0.38) and three...

Data from: A phylogeographical survey of a highly dispersive spider reveals eastern Asia as a major glacial refugium for Palaearctic fauna

Henrik Krehenwinkel, Maxene Graze, Dennis Roedder, Tanaka Kazuhiro, Yuki G. Baba, Christoph Muster, Gabriele Uhl & Kazuhiro Tanaka
Aim: The phylogeographical history of wide-ranging Palaearctic species is not well understood. Here, we present a range-wide phylogeographical study of the wasp spider, Argiope bruennichi (Scopoli, 1772), a highly dispersive and widely distributed Palaearctic species. We aim to identify glacial refugia and patterns of interglacial gene flow across the Palaearctic. Location: Palaearctic region, including the Azores, Madeira, Europe, North Africa and Asia. Methods: We conduct a range-wide phylogeographical survey. Our study is based on nuclear...

Data from: How diverse is Mitopus morio? Integrative taxonomy detects cryptic species in a small-scale sample of a widespread harvestman

Wolfgang Arthofer, Hannes Rauch, Barbara Thaler-Knoflach, Karl Moder, Christoph Muster, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner & Florian M. Steiner
Mitopus morio is a widespread harvestman species occurring in most of Europe and in moderate and cold-moderate zones of Asia and North America. The species is characterized by extreme variability in body size and leg length. As leg length is correlated with habitat temperature, M. morio has been considered as an example of Allen's rule. Recently, observations for a single location in Tyrol, Austria, indicated the absence of mating between short- and long-legged individuals. This...

Data from: Variable molecular markers for the order Mantophasmatodea (Insecta)

Serena E. Dool, Sven Künzel, Martin Haase, Mike D. Picker, Monika J.B. Eberhard, Mike D Picker, Serena E Dool & Monika J B Eberhard
The recently discovered insect order Mantophasmatodea currently comprises 19 Southern African species. These mainly occur in allopatry, have high levels of colour polymorphism and communicate via species- and gender-specific vibratory signals. High levels of interspecific morphological conservatism mean that cryptic species are likely to be uncovered. These aspects of Mantophasmatodean biology make them an ideal group in which to investigate population divergence due to habitat-specific adaptation, sexual selection and potentially sensory speciation. Lack of appropriate...

Data from: The program STRUCTURE does not reliably recover the correct population structure when sampling is uneven: sub-sampling and new estimators alleviate the problem

Sébastien J. Puechmaille
Inferences of population structure and more precisely the identification of genetically homogeneous groups of individuals are essential to the fields of ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation biology. Such population structure inferences are routinely investigated via the program STRUCTURE implementing a Bayesian algorithm to identify groups of individuals at Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. While the method is performing relatively well under various population models with even sampling between subpopulations, the robustness of the method to uneven...

Data from: Glacial refugia, recolonisation patterns, and diversification forces in Alpine-endemic Megabunus harvestmen

Gregor A. Wachter, Anna Papadopoulou, Christoph Muster, Wolfgang Arthofer, L. Lacey Knowles, Florian M. Steiner & Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner
The Pleistocene climatic fluctuations had a huge impact on all life-forms, and various hypotheses regarding the survival of organisms during glacial periods have been postulated. In the European Alps, evidence has been found in support of refugia outside the ice shield (massifs de refuge) acting as sources for postglacial recolonisation of inner-Alpine areas. In contrast, evidence for survival on nunataks, ice-free areas above the glacier, remains scarce. Here, we combine multivariate genetic analyses with ecological...

Data from: Taking the discovery approach in integrative taxonomy: decrypting a complex of narrow-endemic Alpine harvestmen (Opiliones: Phalangiidae: Megabunus)

Gregor A. Wachter, Christoph Muster, Wolfgang Arthofer, Günther Raspotnig, Petra Föttinger, Christian Komposch, Florian M. Steiner & Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner
Species delimitation is fundamental for biological studies, yet precise delimitation is not an easy task, and every involved approach has an inherent failure rate. Integrative taxonomy, a method that merges multiple lines of evidence, can profoundly contribute to reliable alpha taxonomy and shed light on the processes behind speciation. In this study, we explored and validated species limits in a group of closely related Megabunus harvestmen (Eupnoi, Phalangiidae) endemic to the European Alps. Without a...

Data from: Genetic barcoding of dark-spored myxomycetes (Amoebozoa)—Identification, evaluation and application of a sequence similarity threshold for species differentiation in NGS studies

Mathilde Borg Dahl, Asker D. Brjenrod, Martin Unterseher, Thomas Hoppe, Yun Feng, Yuri Novozhilov, Søren J. Sørensen, Martin Schnittler & Asker D. Brejnrod
Unicellular, eukaryotic organisms (protists) play a key role in soil food webs as major predators of microorganisms. However, due to the polyphyletic nature of protists, no single universal barcode can be established for this group, and the structure of many protistean communities remains unresolved. Plasmodial slime moulds (Myxogastria or Myxomycetes) stand out among protists by their formation of fruit bodies, which allow for a morphological species concept. By Sanger sequencing of a large collection of...

Data from: Light availability impacts structure and function of phototrophic stream biofilms across domains and trophic levels

Mia M. Bengtsson, Karoline Wagner, Clarissa Schwab, Tim Urich & Tom J. Battin
Phototrophic biofilms are ubiquitous in freshwater and marine environments where they are critical for biogeochemical cycling, food webs and in industrial applications. In streams, phototrophic biofilms dominate benthic microbial life and harbor an immense prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial biodiversity with biotic interactions across domains and trophic levels. Here, we examine how community structure and function of these biofilms respond to varying light availability, as the crucial energy source for phototrophic biofilms. Using metatranscriptomics, we found...

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Resource Types

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Affiliations

  • University of Greifswald
    21
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Innsbruck
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  • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology
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  • Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research
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  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
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  • National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences
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