354 Works

Data from: Rapid microsatellite marker development for African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis, Meliaceae) using next-generation sequencing and assessment of its intra-specific genetic diversity.

Mirko Karan, Darren S. Evans, Katharina Schulte, Carole Wright, David Innes, Timothy A. Holton, D. Garth Nikles & Geoff R. Dickinson
Khaya senegalensis (African mahogany or dry-zone mahogany) is a high-value hardwood timber species with great potential for forest plantations in northern Australia. The species is distributed across the sub-Saharan belt from Senegal to Sudan and Uganda. Due to heavy exploitation and constraints on natural regeneration and sustainable planting, it is now classified as a vulnerable species. Here we describe the development of microsatellite markers for K. senegalensis using next generation sequencing in order to assess...

Data from: Fitness consequences of larval traits persist across the metamorphic boundary

Angela J Crean, Keyne Monro & Dustin J. Marshall
Metamorphosis is thought to provide an adaptive decoupling between traits specialised for each life-history stage in species with complex life cycles. However, an increasing number of studies are finding that larval traits can carry-over to influence post-metamorphic performance, suggesting that these life-history stages may not be free to evolve independently of each other. We used a phenotypic selection framework to compare the relative and interactive effects of larval size, time to hatching, and time to...

Data from: Geomolecular dating and the origin of placental mammals

Matthew J. Phillips
In modern evolutionary divergence analysis the role of geological information extends beyond providing a timescale, to informing molecular rate variation across the tree. Here I consider the implications of this development. I use fossil calibrations to test the accuracy of models of molecular rate evolution for placental mammals, and reveal substantial misspecification associated with life history rate correlates. Adding further calibrations to reduce dating errors at specific nodes unfortunately tends to transfer underlying rate errors...

Data from: Anthropogenic debris ingestion by avifauna in eastern Australia

Lauren Roman, Qamar A. Schuyler, Britta Denise Hardesty & Kathy A. Townsend
Anthropogenic debris in the world’s oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia’s coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian...

Data from: Curvilinear telomere length dynamics in a squamate reptile

Beata Ujvari, Peter A. Biro, Jordan E. Charters, Gregory Brown, Kim Heasman, Christa Beckman, Thomas Madsen & Christa Beckmann
The lack of consensus concerning the impact of telomere length (TL) dynamics on survival emphasizes the need for additional studies to evaluate the effect of TL on key life-history processes. Using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, we therefore explored age-specific TL dynamics in a squamate reptile: the frillneck lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii). Our cross-sectional analyses revealed that young lizards had short TL, TL increased in medium-aged lizards, but TL decreased in older age cohorts, revealing a...

Data from: Characterising the ecological trade-offs throughout the early ontogeny of coral recruitment

Christopher Doropoulos, George Roff, Yves-Marie Bozec, Mirta Zupan, Johanna Werminghausen & Peter J. Mumby
Drivers of recruitment in sessile marine organisms are often poorly understood, due to the rapidly changing requirements experienced during early ontogeny. The complex suite of physical, biological, and ecological interactions beginning at larval settlement involves a series of trade-offs that influence recruitment success. For example, while cryptic settlement within complex microhabitats is a commonly observed phenomenon in sessile marine organisms, it is unclear whether trade-offs between competition in cryptic refuges and predation on exposed surfaces...

Data from: Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area

Sarah Greenwood, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret, Thomas Kitzberger, Craig D. Allen, Rod Fensham, Daniel C. Laughlin, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bonisch, Nathan J. B. Kraft & Alistair S. Jump
Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and...

Data from: Transcriptome dynamics over a lunar month in a broadcast spawning Acroporid coral

Matthew J. Oldach, Matthew Workentine, Mikhail V. Matz, Tung-Yung Fan & Peter D. Vize
On one night per year, at a specific point in the lunar cycle, one of the most extraordinary reproductive events on the planet unfolds as hundreds of millions of broadcast spawning corals release their trillions of gametes into the waters of the tropical seas. Each species spawns on a specific night within the lunar cycle, typically from full moon to third quarter moon, and in a specific time window after sunset. This accuracy is essential...

Data from: A few large roads or many small ones? How to accommodate growth in vehicle numbers to minimise impacts on wildlife

Jonathan R. Rhodes, Daniel Lunney, John Callaghan & Clive A. McAlpine
Roads and vehicular traffic are among the most pervasive of threats to biodiversity because they fragmenting habitat, increasing mortality and opening up new areas for the exploitation of natural resources. However, the number of vehicles on roads is increasing rapidly and this is likely to continue into the future, putting increased pressure on wildlife populations. Consequently, a major challenge is the planning of road networks to accommodate increased numbers of vehicles, while minimising impacts on...

Data from: Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children

Tom Jefferson, Mark A. Jones, Peter Doshi, Chris B. Del Mar, Rokuro Hama, Matthew J. Thompson, Elizabeth A. Spencer, Igho Onakpoya, Kamal R. Mahtani, David Nunan, Jeremy Howick, Carl J. Heneghan & Igho J Onakpoya
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN TWO OTHER ARTICLES. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g2547 AND http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g2545 FOR MORE INFORMATION. Background: Neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are stockpiled and recommended by public health agencies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza. They are used clinically worldwide. Objectives: To describe the potential benefits and harms of NIs for influenza in all age groups by reviewing all clinical study reports of published and unpublished randomised, placebo-controlled trials and...

Data from: The evolution of bipedal running in lizards suggests a consequential origin may be exploited in later lineages.

Christofer J. Clemente
The origin of bipedal locomotion in lizards is unclear. Modeling studies have suggested that bipedalism may be an exaptation, a byproduct of features originally designed to increase maneuverability, which were only later exploited. Measurement of the body center of mass (BCOM) in 124 species of lizards confirms a significant rearward shift among bipedal lineages. Further racetrack trials showed a significant acceleration threshold between bipedal and quadrupedal runs. These suggest good general support for a passive...

Data from: Viral tagging reveals discrete populations in Synechococcus viral genome sequence space

Li Deng, J. Cesar Ignacio-Espinoza, Ann C. Gregory, Bonnie T. Poulos, Joshua S. Weitz, Philip Hugenholtz & Matthew B. Sullivan
Microbes and their viruses drive myriad processes across ecosystems ranging from oceans and soils to bioreactors and humans. Despite this importance, microbial diversity is only now being mapped at scales relevant to nature, while the viral diversity associated with any particular host remains little researched. Here we quantify host-associated viral diversity using viral-tagged metagenomics, which links viruses to specific host cells for high-throughput screening and sequencing. In a single experiment, we screened 107 Pacific Ocean...

Data from: Synergistic interaction between UVB radiation and temperature increases susceptibility to parasitic infection in a fish

Rebecca L. Cramp, Stefanie Reid, Frank Seebacher & Craig E. Franklin
Levels of UVB radiation (UVB) and mean temperatures have increased substantially over recent decades in many regions of the world. Both stressors independently can compromise immune function, disease resistance and fitness in fish. The impact of UVB can also be exacerbated by interactions with environmental temperatures. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that UVB and temperature act synergistically to influence patterns of energy consumption and susceptibility to disease. We exposed mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, to...

Data from: Predicting climate warming effects on green turtle hatchling viability and dispersal performance

Catherine Cavallo, David Booth, Tim Dempster, Michael R. Kearney, Ella Kelly & Tim S. Jessop
1. Ectotherms are taxa considered highly sensitive to rapid climate warming. This is because body temperature profoundly governs their performance, fitness and life history. Yet, while several modelling approaches currently predict thermal effects on some aspects of life history and demography, they do not consider how temperature simultaneously affects developmental success and offspring phenotypic performance, two additional key attributes that are needed to comprehensively understand species responses to climate warming. 2. Here, we developed a...

Data from: Skin sloughing rate increases with chytrid fungus infection load in a susceptible amphibian

Michel E. B. Ohmer, Rebecca L. Cramp, Craig R. White, Craig E. Franklin & Michel E.B. Ohmer
1. Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is responsible for the greatest disease-driven loss of vertebrate biodiversity in recorded history. Understanding drivers of host susceptibility to this cutaneous disease is hindered by gaps in our knowledge of the host–pathogen relationship. One such overlooked aspect of susceptibility is variation in skin maintenance processes, particularly skin turnover via routine sloughing. It has been suggested that sloughing plays a role in immune defence, by...

Data from: Repeatability of locomotor performance and of morphology - locomotor performance relationships

Cara Conradsen, Jeffrey A Walker, Catherine Perna & Katrina McGuigan
There is good evidence that natural selection drives the evolution of locomotor performance, but the processes that generate among individual variation in locomotion, the substrate upon which selection acts, are relatively poorly understood. We measured prolonged swimming performance, Ucrit, and morphology in a large cohort (n=461) of wildtype zebrafish, Danio rerio, at ∼6 months and again at ∼9 months. Using mixed model analyses to estimate repeatability as the intraclass correlation coefficient, we determined that Ucrit...

Data from: Integrating phylogenetic and ecological distances reveals new insights into parasite host specificity

Nicholas J. Clark & Sonya M. Clegg
The range of hosts a pathogen infects (host specificity) is a key element of disease risk that may be influenced by both shared phylogenetic history and shared ecological attributes of prospective hosts. Phylospecificity indices quantify host specificity in terms of host relatedness, but can fail to capture ecological attributes that increase susceptibility. For instance, similarity in habitat niche may expose phylogenetically unrelated host species to similar pathogen assemblages. Using a recently proposed method that integrates...

Data from: Performance trade-offs and ageing in the ‘world's greatest athletes’

Vincent Careau & Robbie S. Wilson
The mechanistic foundations of performance trade-offs are clear: because body size and shape constrains movement, and muscles vary in strength and fibre type, certain physical traits should act in opposition with others (e.g. sprint versus endurance). Yet performance trade-offs are rarely detected, and traits are often positively correlated. A potential resolution to this conundrum is that within-individual performance trade-offs can be masked by among-individual variation in ‘quality’. Although there is a current debate on how...

Data from: Triggerfish uses chromaticity and lightness for object segregation

Karen L. Cheney, N. Justin Marshall, Fabio Cortesi, Laurie Mitchell & Misha Vorobyev
Humans group components of visual patterns according to their colour, and perceive colours separately from shape. This property of human visual perception is the basis behind the Ishihara test for colour deficiency, where an observer is asked to detect a pattern made up of dots of similar colour with variable lightness against a background of dots made from different colour(s) and lightness. To find out if fish use colour for object segregation in a similar...

Data from: Pluripotency and the origin of animal multicellularity

Shunsuke Sogabe, William L. Hatleberg, Kevin M. Kocot, Tasha E. Say, Daniel Stoupin, Kathrein E. Roper, Selene L. Fernandez-Valverde, Sandie M. Degnan & Bernard M. Degnan
\A widely held—but rarely tested—hypothesis for the origin of animals is that they evolved from a unicellular ancestor, with an apical cilium surrounded by a microvillar collar, that structurally resembled modern sponge choanocytes and choanoflagellates. Here we test this view of animal origins by comparing the transcriptomes, fates and behaviours of the three primary sponge cell types—choanocytes, pluripotent mesenchymal archaeocytes and epithelial pinacocytes—with choanoflagellates and other unicellular holozoans. Unexpectedly, we find that the transcriptome of...

Pre-introduction introgression contributes to parallel differentiation and contrasting hybridisation outcomes between invasive and native marine mussels

Iva Popovic, Nicolas Bierne, Federico Gaiti, Miloš Tanurdžić & Cynthia Riginos
Non-native species experience novel selection pressures in introduced environments and may interbreed with native lineages. Species introductions therefore provide opportunities to investigate repeated patterns of adaptation and introgression across replicated contact zones. Here, we investigate genetic parallelism between multiple introduced populations of the invasive marine mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, in the absence (South Africa and California) and presence of hybridisation with a native congener (Mytilus planulatus in Batemans Bay and Sydney Harbour, Australia). Repeatability in post-introduction...

Cardioespiratory physiological perturbations after acute smoke-induced lung injury and during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in sheep

Saul Chemonges
Background: Numerous successful therapies developed for human medicine involve animal experimentation. Animal studies that are focused solely on translational potential, may not sufficiently document unexpected outcomes. Considerable amounts of data from such studies could be used to advance veterinary science. For example, sheep are increasingly being used as models of intensive care and therefore, data arising from such models must be published. In this study, the hypothesis is that there is little information describing physiological...

Data from: Priorities and motivations of marine coastal restoration research

Elisa Bayraktarov, Shantala Brisbane, Phoebe J Stewart-Sinclair, Audrey Van Herwaarden, Keila Stark, Valerie Hagger, Carter S Smith, Kerrie A Wilson, Catherine E Lovelock, Chris Gillies, Andrew D L Steven & Megan I Saunders
Active restoration is becoming an increasingly important conservation intervention to counteract the degradation of marine coastal ecosystems. Understanding what has motivated the scientific community to research the restoration of marine coastal ecosystems and how restoration research projects are funded is essential if we want to scale-up restoration interventions to meaningful extents.Here, we systematically review and synthesize data to understand the motivations for research on the restoration of coral reefs, seagrass, mangroves, saltmarsh, and oyster reefs....

Data from: Ecological pest control fortifies agricultural growth in Asia-Pacific economies

Kris Wyckhuys
The Green Revolution is credited with alleviating famine, mitigating poverty and driving aggregate economic growth since the 1960s. In Asia, high-input technology packages secured a tripling of rice output, with germplasm improvements providing benefits beyond US$ 4.3 billion/year. Here, we unveil the magnitude and macro-economic relevance of parallel nature-based contributions to productivity growth in non-rice crops over 1918-2018 (covering 23 different Asia-Pacific geopolitical entities). We empirically demonstrate how biological control resolved invasive pest threats in...

Data from: A cross-cultural investigation of young children’s spontaneous invention of tool use behaviors

Karri Neldner, Eva Reindl, Claudio Tennie, Julie Grant, Keyan Tomaselli & Mark Nielsen
Through the mechanisms of observation, imitation and teaching, young children readily pick up the tool using behaviors of their culture. However, little is known about the baseline abilities of children’s tool use: what they might be capable of inventing on their own in the absence of socially provided information. It has been shown that children can spontaneously invent 11 of 12 candidate tool using behaviors observed within the foraging behaviors of wild non-human apes (Reindl,...

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