47 Works

Data from: The behavioural response of migrating humpback whales to a full seismic air gun array

Rebecca A. Dunlop, Michael J. Noad, Robert D. McCauley, Eric Kniest, Robert Slade, David Paton & Douglas H. Cato
Despite concerns on the effects of noise from seismic survey air guns on marine organisms, there remains uncertainty in the biological significance of any response. This study quantifies and interprets the response of migrating humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) to a 3130 cui (51.3l) commercial air gun array. We compare the behavioural responses to active trials (array operational; n = 34 whale groups), with responses to control trials (source vessel towing the array while silent; n...

Data from: Effect of management on natural capital stocks underlying ecosystem service provision: a ‘provider group’ approach

Fleur J. F. Maseyk, László Demeter, Anna Maria Csergo & Yvonne M. Buckley
Land management practices directly impact on the occurrence and condition of natural capital stocks, which can be measured using species diversity and abundance metrics. Species identity and abundance drive ecosystem service supply, either through effects of local diversity and/or through the presence of service providing species. However, the influence of management practices on the provision of ecosystem services is not adequately understood. We grouped grassland plant species into six groups according to desirable attributes (palatability...

Data from: Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets

Mary E. Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Heidi Eager, Laurent Frantz, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Verena J. Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Richard M. Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark C. Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright … & Mark Horton
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological...

Data from: Less favorable climates constrain demographic strategies in plants

Anna M. Csergo, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Olivier Broennimann, Shaun R. Coutts, Antoine Guisan, Amy L. Angert, Erik Welk, Iain Stott, Brian J. Enquist, Brian McGill, Jens-Christian Svenning, Cyrille Violle & Yvonne M. Buckley
Correlative species distribution models are based on the observed relationship between species’ occurrence and macroclimate or other environmental variables. In climates predicted less favourable populations are expected to decline, and in favourable climates they are expected to persist. However, little comparative empirical support exists for a relationship between predicted climate suitability and population performance. We found that the performance of 93 populations of 34 plant species worldwide – as measured by in situ population growth...

Data from: Herbivores safeguard plant diversity by reducing variability in dominance

Brent Mortensen, Brent Danielson, Stan W. Harpole, Juan Alberti, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Lori Biederman, Elizabeth T. Borer, Marc W. Cadotte, John M. Dwyer, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Pablo Luis Peri, Eric W. Seabloom & W. Stanley Harpole
1. Reductions in community evenness can lead to local extinctions as dominant species exclude subordinate species; however, herbivores can prevent competitive exclusion by consuming otherwise dominant plant species, thus increasing evenness. While these predictions logically result from chronic, gradual reductions in evenness, rapid, temporary pulses of dominance may also reduce species richness. Short pulses of dominance can occur as biotic or abiotic conditions temporarily favor one or a few species, manifested as increased temporal variability...

Data from: Strong population structure deduced from genetics, otolith chemistry and parasite abundances explains vulnerability to localised fishery collapse in a large Sciaenid fish, Protonibea diacanthus

Laura Taillebois, Diane P. Barton, David A. Crook, Thor Saunders, Jonathan Taylor, Mark Hearnden, Richard J. Saunders, Stephen J. Newman, Michael J. Travers, David J. Welch, Alan Greig, Christine Dudgeon, Safia Maher & Jennifer R. Ovenden
As pressure on coastal marine resources is increasing globally, the need to quantitatively assess vulnerable fish stocks is crucial in order to avoid the ecological consequences of stock depletions. Species of Sciaenidae (croakers, drums) are important components of tropical and temperate fisheries and are especially vulnerable to exploitation. The black-spotted croaker, Protonibea diacanthus, is the only large sciaenid in coastal waters of northern Australia where it is targeted by commercial, recreational and indigenous fishers due...

Data from: Stabilizing selection on individual pattern elements of aposematic signals

Anne E. Winters, Naomi F. Green, Nerida G. Wilson, Martin J. How, Mary J. Garson, Justin Marshall, Karen L. Cheney & N. Justin Marshall
Warning signal variation is ubiquitous but paradoxical: low variability should aid recognition and learning by predators. However, spatial variability in the direction and strength of selection for individual elements of the warning signal may allow phenotypic variation for some components, but not others. Variation in selection may occur if predators only learn particular colour pattern components rather than the entire signal. Here, we used a nudibranch mollusc, Goniobranchus splendidus, which exhibits a conspicuous red spot/white...

Data from: Sharing is caring? measurement error and the issues arising from combining 3D morphometric datasets

Carmelo Fruciano, Melina A. Celik, Kaylene Butler, Tom Dooley, Vera Weisbecker & Matthew J. Phillips
Geometric morphometrics is routinely used in ecology and evolution and morphometric datasets are increasingly shared among researchers, allowing for more comprehensive studies and higher statistical power (as a consequence of increased sample size). However, sharing of morphometric data opens up the question of how much nonbiologically relevant variation (i.e., measurement error) is introduced in the resulting datasets and how this variation affects analyses. We perform a set of analyses based on an empirical 3D geometric...

Data from: Real-time social selection maintains honesty of a dynamic visual signal in cooperative fish

Judith C. Bachmann, Fabio Cortesi, Matthew D. Hall, N. Justin Marshall, Walter Salzburger & Hugo F. Gante
Our understanding of animal communication has been largely driven by advances in theory since empirical evidence has been difficult to obtain. Costly signaling theory became the dominant paradigm explaining the evolution of honest signals, according to which communication reliability relies on differential costs imposed on signalers to distinguish animals of different quality. On the other hand, mathematical models disagree on the source of costs at the communication equilibrium. Here we present an empirical framework to...

Data from: Species identity and depth predict bleaching severity in reef building corals: shall the deep inherit the reef?

Paul R. Muir, Paul A. Marshall, Ameer Abdulla & J. David Aguirre
Mass bleaching associated with unusually high sea temperatures represents one of the greatest threats to corals and coral reef ecosystems. Deeper reef areas are hypothesized as potential refugia, but the susceptibility of Scleractinian species over depth has not been quantified. During the most severe bleaching event on record, we found up to 83% of coral cover severely affected on Maldivian reefs at a depth of 3–5 m, but significantly reduced effects at 24–30 m. Analysis...

Data from: Species wood density and the location of planted seedlings drive early-stage seedling survival during tropical forest restoration

Lachlan S. Charles, John M. Dwyer, Tobias J. Smith, Sophie Connors, Petra Marschner & Margaret M. Mayfield
1.The success of restoration projects is known to vary widely, with outcomes relating to numerous biotic and abiotic factors. Though many studies have examined the factors associated with long-term restoration success, few have examined which factors impact the establishment of restoration plantings. 2.In Australia's Wet Tropics, we used a large replicated restoration experiment to assess seedling survival for 24 native rainforest species commonly used in local restoration efforts. The experiment allowed for a rigorous assessment...

Data from: Predicting community rank-abundance distributions under current and future climates

James K. McCarthy, Karel Mokany, Simon Ferrier & John M. Dwyer
Understanding influences of environmental change on biodiversity requires consideration of more than just species richness. Here we present a novel framework for understanding possible changes in species’ abundance structures within communities under climate change. We demonstrate this using comprehensive survey and environmental data from 1,748 woody plant communities across southeast Queensland, Australia, to model rank-abundance distributions (RADs) under current and future climates. Under current conditions, the models predicted RADs consistent with the region’s dominant vegetation...

Data from: Genotypic covariance between the performance of a resident species and community assembly in the field

Arthur M. Riedel, Keyne Monro, Mark W. Blows & Dustin J. Marshall
1.Genetic variation in resident species can influence the assembly and dynamics of communities, but the potential for these genetic effects to persist across generations is largely unresolved. In principle, persistent, directional changes in communities are only predicted when community properties covary genetically with the fitness of resident species. 2.Estimates of genetic covariance between the fitness of a resident species and its community are therefore necessary to ‘close the eco-evolutionary loop’ in studies of community genetics,...

Data from: Interactive life-history traits predict sensitivity of plants and animals to temporal autocorrelation

Maria Paniw, Arpat Ozgul & Roberto Salguero-Gomez
Temporal autocorrelation in demographic processes is an important aspect of population dynamics, but a comprehensive examination of its effects on different life-history strategies is lacking. We use matrix populations models from 454 plant and animal populations to simulate stochastic population growth rates (log λs) under different temporal autocorrelations in demographic rates, using simulated and observed covariation among rates. We then test for differences in sensitivities, or changes, of log λs to changes in autocorrelation among...

Data from: Ecological context and the probability of mistakes underlie speed choice

Rebecca Wheatley, Amanda C. Niehaus, Diana O. Fisher & Robbie S. Wilson
1.Movement is fundamental to the ecology of animals, and an animal's choice of movement speed determines the duration, energetic costs, and probability of success of any given activity. It is often assumed that animals should use maximum speeds when escaping from predators, but an increasing number of studies find animals rarely move as fast as they can in nature because faster speeds come with a greater chance of mistakes. Mathematical modelling suggests that, when escaping...

Data from: Sibling species of mutualistic Symbiodinium clade G from bioeroding sponges in the western Pacific and western Atlantic oceans

Blake D. Ramsby, Malcolm S. Hill, Daniel J. Thornhill, Sieuwkje F. Steenuizen, Michelle Achlatis, Allison M. Lewis, Todd C. LaJeunesse & Sieuwkje F. Steenhuizen
Dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium associate with a broad array of metazoan and protistian hosts. Symbiodinium-based symbioses involving bioeroding sponge hosts have received less attention than those involving scleractinian hosts. Certain species of common Cliona harbor high densities of an ecologically restricted group of Symbiodinium, referred to as Clade G. The relationships of these unusual Clade G Symbiodinium with Foraminifera, sponges, and black coral (Antipatharia) are rarely studied. Nonetheless, analyses of genetic evidence indicate that...

Data from: Constraints on trait combinations explain climatic drivers of biodiversity: the importance of trait covariance in community assembly

John M. Dwyer & Daniel C. Laughlin
Trade-offs maintain diversity and structure communities along environmental gradients. Theory indicates that if covariance among functional traits sets a limit on the number of viable trait combinations in a given environment, then communities with strong multidimensional trait constraints should exhibit low species diversity. We tested this prediction in winter annual plant assemblages along an aridity gradient using multilevel structural equation modelling. Univariate and multivariate functional diversity measures were poorly explained by aridity, and were surprisingly...

Data from: Mobulid rays feed on euphausiids in the Bohol Sea

Christoph A. Rohner, Katherine B. Burgess, Joshua M. Rambahiniarison, Joshua D. Stewart, Alessandro Ponzo & Anthony J. Richardson
Mobulid rays have a conservative life history and are caught in direct fisheries and as by-catch. Their subsequent vulnerability to overexploitation has recently been recognized, but fisheries management can be ineffective if it ignores habitat and prey preferences and other trophic interactions of the target species. Here, we assessed the feeding ecology of four mobulids (Manta birostris, Mobula tarapacana, M. japanica, M. thurstoni) in the Bohol Sea, Philippines, using stomach contents analysis of fisheries specimens...

Data from: Landscape context explains changes in the functional diversity of regenerating forests better than climate or species richness

Michael Sams, Hao Ran Lai, Stephen Bonser, Peter Vesk, Robert Kooyman, Daniel Metcalfe, John W. Morgan, Margaret Mayfield, M. A. Sams, D. J. Metcalfe, R. M. Kooyman & P. A. Vesk
Aim A rich literature on forest succession provides general expectations for the steps forests go through while reassembling after disturbance, yet we still have a surprisingly poor understanding of why the outcomes of forest recovery after logging (or other disturbances) vary so extensively. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that regional species pool, system productivity, climate and landscape structure are important drivers of forest reassembly outcomes. Location Transect 1,500 km in length along the...

Data from: A newly recognised species that has been confused with the global polyphagous pest scale insect, Coccus hesperidum Linnaeus (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Coccidae)

Yen-Po Lin, Hirotaka Tanaka, Takumasa Kondo & Lyn G. Cook
Coccus hesperidum L. (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Coccidae), the type species of the soft scale genus Coccus L., the family Coccidae and the whole of the scale insects (Coccoidea), is a cosmopolitan plant pest. Using DNA sequence data and morphological comparisons, we determine that there is a distinct species that is morphologically very similar to C. hesperidum. Here, we describe the species as Coccus praetermissus Lin & Tanaka sp. n., based on adult female specimens from Australia,...

Data from: The role of topography and plant functional traits in determining tropical reforestation success

Alexander W. Cheesman, Noel D. Preece, Penny Van Oosterzee, Peter D. Erskine & Lucas A. Cernusak
1.Early establishment and sapling growth is a key phase in ensuring cost-effective reforestation success in relation to biodiversity outcomes. Therefore species selection must consider the interaction between plant functional traits and the often-challenging and heterogeneous biophysical environment of degraded landscapes. 2.In this study, we examine how microtopography (slope) results in spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients, especially phosphorus (P) in a degraded tropical pasture landscape in Queensland, Australia. We then explore how this small-scale heterogeneity influences...

Data from: The large-scale drivers of population declines in a long-distance migratory shorebird

Nicholas J. Murray, Peter P. Marra, Richard A. Fuller, Robert S. Clemens, Kiran Dhanjal-Adams, Ken B. Gosbell, Chris J. Hassell, Takuya Iwamura, David Melville, Clive D. T. Minton, Adrian C. Riegen, Danny I. Rogers, Eric J. Woehler & Colin E. Studds
Migratory species can travel tens of thousands of kilometers each year, spending different parts of their annual cycle in geographically distinct locations. Understanding the drivers of population change is vital for conserving migratory species, yet the challenge of collecting data over entire geographic ranges has hindered attempts to identify the processes leading to observed population changes. Here, we use remotely sensed environmental data and count data to investigate the factors driving variability in abundance in...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    47

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    47

Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    47
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    7
  • Monash University
    5
  • Macquarie University
    3
  • James Cook University
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Rice University
    2
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    2
  • University of Waikato
    2
  • University of Maine
    2