42 Works

Data from: The foot is more than a spring: human foot muscles perform work to adapt to the energetic requirements of locomotion

Ryan Riddick, Dominic J. Farris & Luke A. Kelly
The foot has been considered both as an elastic mechanism that increases the efficiency of locomotion by recycling energy, as well as an energy sink that helps stabilize movement by dissipating energy through contact with the ground. We measured the activity of two intrinsic foot muscles, Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) and Abductor Hallucis (AH), as well as the mechanical work performed by the foot as a whole and at a modelled plantar muscle tendon unit...

Data from: Mitochondrial genome fragmentation unites the parasitic lice of eutherian mammals

Fan Song, Hu Li, Guo-Hua Liu, Wei Wang, Peter James, Douglas D. Colwell, Anette Tran, Siyu Gong, Wanzhi Cai & Renfu Shao
Organelle genome fragmentation has been found in a wide range of eukaryotic lineages; however, its use in phylogenetic reconstruction has not been demonstrated. We explored the use of mitochondrial (mt) genome fragmentation in resolving the controversial suborder-level phylogeny of parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera). There are ~5,000 species of parasitic lice in four suborders (Amblycera, Ischnocera, Rhyncophthirina and Anoplura), which infest mammals and birds. The phylogenetic relationships among these suborders are unresolved despite decades of studies....

Data from: Two speed invasion: assisted and intrinsic dispersal of common mynas over 150-years of colonization

Kyle M. Ewart, Andrea S. Griffin, Rebecca N. Johnson, Salit Kark, Tali Magory Cohen, Nathan Lo & Richard E. Major
Aim: Despite the common myna’s widespread distribution, and the significant impact it has caused in parts of its non-native range, there have been no comprehensive genomic studies of its invasion of any region. We aimed to characterize the common myna invasion of the Australian continent to understand its population genetic landscape, introduction history, dispersal characteristics, and the interconnectedness between different source populations and invasive fronts. Location: Common mynas from 26 geographical locations spanning the Australian...

Data from: The effect of habitat fragmentation on the bee visitor assemblages of three Australian tropical rainforest tree species

Tobias J. Smith & Margaret M. Mayfield
Tropical forest loss and fragmentation can change bee community dynamics, and potentially interrupt plant-pollinator relationships. While bee community responses to forest fragmentation have been investigated in a number of tropical regions, no studies have focused on this topic in Australia. In this study we examine taxonomic and functional diversity of bees visiting flowers of three tree species across small and large rainforest fragments in Australian tropical landscapes. We found lower taxonomic diversity of bees visiting...

Data from: Seasonality, alarm pheromone and serotonin: insights on the neurobiology of honeybee defence from winter bees

Morgane Nouvian, Nina Deisig, Judith Reinhard & Martin Giurfa
Honeybees maintain their colony throughout the cold winters, a strategy that enables them to make the most of early spring flowers. During this period, their activity is mostly limited to thermoregulation, while foraging and brood rearing are stopped. Less is known about seasonal changes to the essential task of defending the colony against intruders, which is regulated by the sting alarm pheromone. We studied the stinging responsiveness of winter bees exposed to this scent or...

Data from: Evaluating the ability of community‐protected forests in Cambodia to prevent deforestation and degradation using temporal remote sensing data

Minerva Singh, Damian Evans, Jean-Baptise Chevance, Boun Suy Tan, Nicholas Wiggins, Leaksmy Kong & Sakada Sakhoeun
Community forests are known to play an important role in preserving forests in Cambodia, a country that has seen rapid deforestation in recent decades. The detailed evaluation of the ability of community‐protected forests to retain forest cover and prevent degradation in Cambodia will help to guide future conservation management. In this study, a combination of remotely sensing data was used to compare the temporal variation in forest structure for six different community forests located in...

Data from: Age and area predict patterns of species richness in pumice rafts contingent on oceanic climatic zone encountered

Eleanor Velasquez, Scott E. Bryan, Merrick Ekins, Alex G. Cook, Lucy Hurrey & Jennifer Firn
The Theory of Island Biogeography predicts that area and age explain species richness patterns (or alpha diversity) in insular habitats. Using a unique natural phenomenon, pumice rafting, we measured the influence of area, age and oceanic climate on patterns of species richness. Pumice rafts are formed simultaneously when submarine volcanoes erupt, the pumice clasts break-up irregularly, forming irregularly shaped pumice stones which while floating through the ocean are colonised by marine biota. We analyse two...

Data from: Time for a rethink: time sub-sampling methods in disparity-through-time analyses

Thomas Guillerme & Natalie Cooper
Disparity-through-time analyses can be used to determine how morphological diversity changes in response to mass extinctions, and to investigate the drivers of morphological change. These analyses are routinely applied to palaeobiological datasets, yet although there is much discussion about how to best calculate disparity, there has been little consideration of how taxa should be sub-sampled through time. Standard practice is to group taxa into discrete time bins, often based on stratigraphic periods. However, this can...

Data from: Forest disturbance and seasonal food availability influence a conditional seed dispersal mutualism

Babale Aliyu, Joshua A. Thia, Elena Moltchanova, Pierre-Michel Forget & Hazel M. Chapman
The interaction between granivorous scatter-hoarding mammals and plants is a conditional mutualism: scatter-hoarders consume seeds (acting as predators), but the movement of seed by scatter-hoarders may contribute to dispersal (acting as mutualists). Understanding the ecological factors that shape this relationship is highly relevant in anthropogenically disturbed tropical forests where large-bodied frugivores are extirpated. In such forests, large-seeded trees that once depended on these frugivores for dispersal may now only have scatter-hoarders as prospective dispersers. We...

Data from: When to monitor and when to act: value of information theory for multiple management units and limited budgets

Joseph R. Bennett, Sean L. Maxwell, Amanda E. Martin, Iadine Chadès, Lenore Fahrig & Benjamin Gilbert
1.The question of when to monitor and when to act is fundamental to applied ecology, and notoriously difficult to answer. Value of information (VOI) theory holds great promise to help answer this question for many management problems. However, VOI theory in applied ecology has only been demonstrated in single-decision problems, and has lacked explicit links between monitoring and management costs. 2.Here, we present an extension of VOI theory for solving multi-unit decisions of whether to...

Data from: The ‘filtering’ metaphor revisited: competition and environment jointly structure invasibility and coexistence

Rachel M. Germain, Margaret M. Mayfield & Benjamin Gilbert
‘Filtering’, or the reduction in species diversity that occurs because not all species can persist in all locations, is thought to unfold hierarchically, controlled by the environment at large scales and competition at small scales. However, the ecological effects of competition and the environment are not independent, and observational approaches preclude investigation into their interplay. We use a demographic approach with 30 plant species to experimentally test (i) the effect of competition on species persistence...

Data from: Global patterns in helminth host specificity: phylogenetic and functional diversity of regional host species pools matter

Konstans Wells, David I. Gibson & Nicholas J. Clark
Host specificity has a major influence on a parasite’s ability to shift between human and animal host species. Yet there is a dearth of quantitative approaches to explore variation in host specificity across biogeographical scales, particularly in response to the varying community compositions of potential hosts. We built a global dataset of intermediate host associations for nine of the world’s most widespread helminth parasites (all of which infect humans). Using hierarchical models, we asked if...

Data from: Neuromechanical coupling within the human triceps surae and its consequence on individual force sharing strategies

Marion Crouzier, Lilian Lacourpaille, Antoine Nordez, Kylie Tucker & Francois Hug
Little is known about the factors that influence the coordination of synergist muscles that act across the same joint, even during single-joint isometric tasks. The overall aim of this study was to determine the nature of the relationship between the distribution of activation and the distribution of force-generating capacity among the three heads of the triceps surae (soleus [SOL], gastrocnemius medialis [GM] and lateralis [GL]). Twenty volunteers performed isometric plantarflexions during which the activation of...

Data from: Multiple habitat use by declining migratory birds necessitates joined-up conservation

Micha V Jackson, L R Carrasco, Chi-Yeung Choi, Jing Li, Zhijun Ma, David S Melville, Tong Mu, He-Bo Peng, Bradley K Woodworth, Ziyou Yang, Lin Zhang & Richard A Fuller
Many species depend on multiple habitats at different points in space and time. Their effective conservation requires an understanding of how and when each habitat is used, coupled with adequate protection. Migratory shorebirds use intertidal and supratidal wetlands, both of which are affected by coastal landscape change. Yet the extent to which shorebirds use artificial supratidal habitats, particularly at highly developed stopover sites, remains poorly understood leading to potential deficiencies in habitat management. We surveyed...

Data from: A genomic reference panel for Drosophila serrata

Adam R. Reddiex, Scott L. Allen & Stephen F. Chenoweth
Here we describe a collection of re-sequenced inbred lines of Drosophila serrata, sampled from a natural population situated deep within the species endemic distribution in Brisbane, Australia. D. serrata is a member of the speciose montium group whose members inhabit much of south east Asia and has been well studied for aspects of climatic adaptation, sexual selection, sexual dimorphism, and mate recognition. We sequenced 110 lines that were inbred via 17-20 generations of full-sib mating...

Data from: Short-term response of a declining woodland bird assemblage to the removal of a despotic competitor

Galen Davitt, Kimberly Maute, Richard E. Major, Paul G. McDonald & Martine Maron
Interspecific aggression by the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala), a highly despotic species, is homogenizing woodland avifaunas across eastern Australia. Although a native species, the noisy miner's aggressive exclusion of small birds is a Key Threatening Process under national law. Large‐scale removal of noisy miners has been proposed as a management response to this threat following increases in miner presence due to anthropogenic land use practices. We tested this proposal by experimentally removing noisy miners from...

Data from: QuLinePlus: extending plant breeding strategy and genetic model simulation to cross-pollinated populations – case studies in forage breeding

Valerio Hoyos-Villegas, Vivi N. Arief, Wen-Hsi Yang, Mingzhu Sun, Ian H. DeLacy, Brent A. Barrett, Zulfi Jahufer & Kaye E. Basford
Plant breeders are supported by a range of tools that assist them to make decisions about the conduct or design of plant breeding programs. Simulations are a strategic tool that enable the breeder to integrate the multiple components of a breeding program into a number of proposed scenarios that are compared by a range of statistics measuring the efficiency of the proposed systems. A simulation study for the trait growth score compared two major strategies...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    42

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    42

Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    42
  • University of the Sunshine Coast
    3
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • Queensland University of Technology
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Canterbury
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • National University of Singapore
    2