288 Works

Data from: Differential effects of landscape-level environmental features on genetic structure in three co-distributed tree species in Central America

Monica F. Poelchau, Jim L. Hamrick & J. L. Hamrick
Landscape genetic studies use spatially explicit population genetic information to determine the physical and environmental causes of population genetic structure on regional scales. Comparative studies that identify common barriers to gene flow across multiple species within a community are important to both understand the evolutionary trajectories of populations and to prioritize habitat conservation. Here, we use a comparative landscape genetic approach to ask whether gradients in temperature or precipitation seasonality structure genetic variation across three...

Data from: Variation in opsin genes correlates with signaling ecology in North American fireflies

Sarah E. Sander, David W. Hall, S. E. Sander & D. W. Hall
Genes underlying signal reception should evolve to maximize signal detection in a particular environment. In animals, opsins, the protein component of visual pigments, are predicted to evolve according to this expectation. Fireflies are known for their bioluminescent mating signals. The eyes of nocturnal species are expected to maximize the detection of conspecific signal colours emitted in the typical low-light environment. This is not expected for species that have transitioned to diurnal activity in bright daytime...

Data from: Adaptive divergence in wine yeasts and their wild relatives suggests a prominent role for introgressions and rapid evolution at non coding sites

Pedro Almeida, Raquel Barbosa, Douda Bensasson, Paula Gonçalves & José Paulo Sampaio
In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main yeast in wine fermentation, the opportunity to examine divergence at the molecular level between a domesticated lineage and its wild counterpart arose recently due to the identification of the closest relatives of wine strains, a wild population associated with Mediterranean oaks. Since genomic data is available for a considerable number of representatives belonging to both groups, we used population genomics to estimate the degree and distribution of nucleotide variation between...

Data from: MonotomidGen – A matrix-based interactive key to the New World genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea)

Thomas C. McElrath, Olivia F. Boyd & Joseph V. McHugh
A matrix-based Lucid key is presented for the twelve genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) represented in the New World. A general overview is given for the features and technical specifications of an original interactive key for the identification of these genera. The list of terminal taxa included with the key provides a current summary of monotomid generic diversity for the Nearctic and Neotropical regions.

Data from: The evolution of peafowl and other taxa with ocelli (eyespots): a phylogenomic approach

Keping Sun, Kelly A. Meiklejohn, Brant C. Faircloth, Travis C. Glenn, Edward L. Braun, Rebecca T. Kimball, B. C. Faircloth, T. C. Glenn, E. L. Braun, R. T. Kimball, K. A. Meiklejohn & K. Sun
The most striking feature of peafowl (Pavo) is the males' elaborate train, which exhibits ocelli (ornamental eyespots) that are under sexual selection. Two additional genera within the Phasianidae (Polyplectron and Argusianus) exhibit ocelli, but the appearance and location of these ornamental eyespots exhibit substantial variation among these genera, raising the question of whether ocelli are homologous. Within Polyplectron, ocelli are ancestral, suggesting ocelli may have evolved even earlier, prior to the divergence among genera. However,...

Data from: Retrotransposon proliferation coincident with the evolution of dioecy in asparagus

Alex Harkess, Francesco Mercati, Loredana Abbate, Michael McKain, J. Chris Pires, Tea Sala, Francesco Sunseri, Agostino Falavigna & Jim Leebens-Mack
Current phylogenetic sampling reveals that dioecy and an XY sex chromosome pair evolved once or possibly twice in the genus Asparagus. Although there appear to be some lineage-specific polyploidization events, the base chromosome number of 2n=2x=20 is relatively conserved across the Asparagus genus. Regardless, dioecious species tend to have larger genomes than hermaphroditic species. Here we test whether this genome size expansion in dioecious species is related to a polyploidization and subsequent chromosome fusion or...

Data from: More than 1000 ultraconserved elements provide evidence that turtles are the sister group of archosaurs

Nicholas G. Crawford, Brant C. Faircloth, John E. McCormack, Robb T. Brumfield, Kevin Winker, Travis C. Glenn, B. C. Faircloth, R. T. Brumfield, J. E. McCormack, T. C. Glenn & N. G. Crawford
We present the first genomic-scale analysis addressing the phylogenetic position of turtles, using over 1,000 loci from representatives of all major reptile lineages including tuatara. Previously, studies of morphological traits positioned turtles either at the base of the reptile tree or with lizards, snakes, and tuatara (lepidosaurs), whereas molecular analyses typically allied turtles with crocodiles and birds (archosaurs). A recent analysis of shared microRNA families found that turtles are more closely related to lepidosaurs. To...

Data from: Diet and trophic interactions of a circumglobally significant gelatinous marine zooplankter, Dolioletta gegenbauri (Uljanin, 1884)

Tina L. Walters, Lauren M. Lamboley, Natalia B. Lopez-Figueroa, Aurea E. Rodriguez-Santiago, Deidre M. Gibson & Marc E. Frischer
Gelatinous zooplankton play a crucial role in marine planktonic food webs. However, primarily due to methodological challenges, the in situ diet of zooplankton remains poorly investigated and little is known about their trophic interactions including feeding behavior, prey selection, and in situ feeding rates. This is particularly true for gelatinous zooplankton including the marine pelagic tunicate, Dolioletta gegenbauri. In this study, we applied an 18S rRNA amplicon metabarcoding approach to identify the diet of captive-fed...

Data from: Machine learning to classify animal species in camera trap images: applications in ecology

Micheal A. Tabak, Mohammad Sadegh Norouzzadeh, Michael A. Tabak, David W. Wolfson, Steven J. Sweeney, Paul A. Di Salvo, Ryan S. Miller, Jesse S. Lewis, Mohammad S. Norouzzadeh, Jeff Clune, Ryan K. Brook, Elizabeth G. Mandeville, Paul M. Lukacs, Anna K. Moeller, Raoul K. Boughton, Bethany Wight, James C. Beasley & Peter E. Schlichting
Motion‐activated cameras (“camera traps”) are increasingly used in ecological and management studies for remotely observing wildlife and are amongst the most powerful tools for wildlife research. However, studies involving camera traps result in millions of images that need to be analysed, typically by visually observing each image, in order to extract data that can be used in ecological analyses. We trained machine learning models using convolutional neural networks with the ResNet‐18 architecture and 3,367,383 images...

Data from: Integrating phylogenomic and population genomic patterns in avian lice provides a more complete picture of parasite evolution

Andrew D. Sweet, Bret M. Boyd, Julie M. Allen, Scott M. Villa, Michel P. Valim, Jose L. Rivera-Parra, Robert E. Wilson & Kevin P. Johnson
Parasite diversity accounts for most of the biodiversity on earth, and is shaped by many processes (e.g. cospeciation, host-switching). To identify the effects of the processes that shape parasite diversity, it is ideal to incorporate both deep (phylogenetic) and shallow (population) perspectives. To this end, we developed a novel workflow to obtain phylogenetic and population genetic data from whole genome sequences of body lice parasitizing New World ground-doves. Phylogenies from these data showed consistent, highly...

Data from: Genomics of Compositae weeds: EST libraries, microarrays, and evidence of introgression

Zhao Lai, Nolan C. Kane, Alex Kozik, Kathryn A. Hodgins, Katrina M. Dlugosch, Michael S. Barker, Marta Matvienko, Qian Yu, Kathryn G. Turner, Stephanie A. Pearl, Graeme D.M. Bell, Yi Zou, Chris Grassa, Alessia Guggisberg, Keith L. Adams, James V. Anderson, David P. Horvath, Richard V. Kesseli, John M. Burke, Richard W. Michelmore, Loren H. Rieseberg, Stephanie Anne Pearl & Graeme D. M. Bell
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Weeds cause considerable environmental and economic damage. However, genomic characterization of weeds has lagged behind that of model plants and crop species. Here we report on the development of genomic tools and resources for 11 weeds from the Compositae family that will serve as a basis for subsequent population and comparative genomic analyses. Because hybridization has been suggested as a stimulus for the evolution of invasiveness, we also analyze these genomic...

Data from: A universal probe set for targeted sequencing of 353 nuclear genes from any flowering plant designed using k-medoids clustering

Matthew G. Johnson, Lisa Pokorny, Steven Dodsworth, Laura R. Botigue, Robyn S. Cowan, Alison Devault, Wolf L. Eiserhardt, Niroshini Epitawalage, Félix Forest, Jan T. Kim, James Leebens-Mack, Ilia J. Leitch, Olivier Maurin, Doug Soltis, Pamela S. Soltis, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, William J. Baker, Norman Wickett & Gane Ka-Shu Wong
Sequencing of target-enriched libraries is an efficient and cost-effective method for obtaining DNA sequence data from hundreds of nuclear loci for phylogeny reconstruction. Much of the cost of developing targeted sequencing approaches is associated with the generation of preliminary data needed for the identification of orthologous loci for probe design. In plants, identifying orthologous loci has proven difficult due to a large number of whole-genome duplication events, especially in the angiosperms (flowering plants). We used...

Data from: Genomics of Compositae crops: reference transcriptome assemblies, and evidence of hybridization with wild relatives

Kathryn A. Hodgins, Zhao Lai, Luiz O. Oliveira, David W. Still, Moira Scascitelli, Michael S. Barker, Nolan C. Kane, Hannes Dempewolf, Alex Kozik, Richard V. Kesseli, John M. Burke, Richard W. Michelmore & Loren H. Rieseberg
Although the Compositae harbours only two major food crops, sunflower and lettuce, many other species in this family are utilized by humans and have experienced various levels of domestication. Here we have used next generation sequencing technology to develop 15 reference transcriptome assemblies for Compositae crops or their wild relatives. These data allow us to gain insight into the evolutionary and genomic consequences of plant domestication. Specifically, we performed Illumina sequencing of Cichorium endivia, Cichorium...

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