50 Works

Data from: Genetic sampling for estimating density of common species

Ellen Cheng, Karen E. Hodges, Rahel Sollmann & L. Scott Mills
Understanding population dynamics requires reliable estimates of population density, yet this basic information is often surprisingly difficult to obtain. With rare or difficult-to-capture species, genetic surveys from noninvasive collection of hair or scat has proved cost-efficient for estimating densities. Here, we explored whether noninvasive genetic sampling (NGS) also offers promise for sampling a relatively common species, the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus Erxleben, 1777), in comparison with traditional live trapping. We optimized a protocol for single-session...

Data from: A degradation debt? large-scale shifts in community composition and loss of biomass in a tropical forest fragment after 40 years of isolation

Rakan A. Zahawi, Federico Oviedo-Brenes & Chris J. Peterson
Habitat loss and fragmentation are among the biggest threats to tropical biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. We examined forest dynamics in a mid-elevation 365-ha fragment in southern Costa Rica. The fragment was isolated in the mid-1970s and belongs to the Las Cruces Biological Station. A 2.25-ha permanent plot was established in the center of the old-growth forest (>400 m to nearest edge boundary) and all plants >5 cm DBH were censused, mapped, and identified to...

Data from: Spatial and temporal components of induced plant responses in the context of herbivore life history and impact on host

Charles J. Mason, Caterina Villari, Ken Keefover-Ring, Stephanie Jagemann, Jun Zhu, Pierluigi Bonello & Kenneth F. Raffa
Plants defend against herbivores and pathogens through integrated constitutive and induced defenses. Induced responses may be expressed locally or tissue/plant-wide, i.e. systemically, and may also be primed for subsequent attack. Although the elicitation and efficacy of induced responses are increasingly well-characterized, we have little understanding of how timing and within-plant spatial patterns of induced defenses relate to different herbivore behaviors and selective pressures. We used interactions between pines and their major mortality agents, native bark...

Data from: Duplication and sub/neofunctionalization of Malvolio, an insect homolog of Nramp, in the subsocial beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

Elijah C. Mehlferber, Kyle M. Benowitz, Eileen M. Roy-Zokan, Elizabeth C. McKinney, Christopher B. Cunningham & Allen J. Moore
With growing numbers of sequenced genomes, increasing numbers of duplicate genes are uncovered. Here we examine Malvolio, a gene in the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp) family, that has been duplicated in the subsocial beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, which exhibits advanced parental behavior. There is only one copy of Mvl in honey bees and Drosophila, whereas in vertebrates there are two copies that are subfunctionalized. We first compared amino acid sequences for Drosophila, beetles, mouse and...

Data from: Integrating viability and fecundity selection to illuminate the adaptive nature of genetic clines

Susana M. Wadgymar, S. Caroline Daws, Jill Anderson & Jill T. Anderson
Genetically-based trait variation across environmental gradients can reflect adaptation to local environments. However, natural populations that appear well-adapted often exhibit directional, not stabilizing, selection on ecologically-relevant traits. Temporal variation in the direction of selection could lead to stabilizing selection across multiple episodes of selection, which might be overlooked in short-term studies that evaluate relationships of traits and fitness under only one set of conditions. Furthermore, non-random mortality prior to trait expression can bias inferences about...

Data from: Anticipating the emergence of infectious diseases

Tobias S. Brett, John M. Drake & Pejman Rohani
In spite of medical breakthroughs, the emergence of pathogens continues to pose threats to both human and animal populations. We present candidate approaches for anticipating disease emergence prior to large-scale outbreaks. Through use of ideas from the theories of dynamical systems and stochastic processes we develop approaches which are not specific to a particular disease system or model, but instead have general applicability. The indicators of disease emergence detailed in this paper can be classified...

Data from: Conflicting evolutionary histories of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in New World Myotis bats

, Brant C. Faircloth, Kevin A.M. Sullivan, Troy J. Kieran, Travis C. Glenn, Michael W. Vandewege, , Robert J. Baker, Richard D. Stevens, David A. Ray, Thomas E Lee, Roy N Platt & Kevin A M Sullivan
The rapid diversification of Myotis bats into more than 100 species is one of the most extensive mammalian radiations available for study. Efforts to understand relationships within Myotis have primarily utilized mitochondrial markers and trees inferred from nuclear markers lacked resolution. Our current understanding of relationships within Myotis is therefore biased towards a set of phylogenetic markers that may not reflect the history of the nuclear genome. To resolve this, we sequenced the full mitochondrial...

Data from: Genetic identification of source and likely vector of a widespread marine invader

Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield, Nicole M. Kollars, Allan E. Strand, James E. Byers, Sarah J. Shainker, Ryuta Terada, Thomas W. Greig, Marieke Hammann, David C. Murray, Florian Weinberger & Erik E. Sotka
The identification of native sources and vectors of introduced species informs its ecological and evolutionary history and may guide policies that seek to prevent future introductions. Population genetics represents a powerful set of tools to identify origins and vectors, but can mislead when the native range is poorly sampled or few molecular markers are used. Here, we traced the introduction of the Asian seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Rhodophyta) into estuaries in coastal western North America, the...

Data from: Livestock abundance predicts vampire bat demography, immune profiles, and bacterial infection risk

Daniel J. Becker, Gábor Á. Czirják, Dmitriy V. Volokhov, Alexandra B. Bentz, Jorge E. Carrera, Melinda S. Camus, Kristen J. Navara, Vladimir E. Chizhikov, M. Brock Fenton, Nancy B. Simmons, Sergio E. Recuenco, Amy T. Gilbert, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Human activities create novel food resources that can alter wildlife–pathogen interactions. If resources amplify or dampen pathogen transmission likely depends on both host ecology and pathogen biology, but studies that measure responses to provisioning across both scales are rare. We tested these relationships with a four-year study of 369 common vampire bats across ten sites in Peru and Belize that differ in the abundance of livestock, an important anthropogenic food source. We quantified innate and...

Data from: Ecological causes and consequences of flower color polymorphism in a self-pollinating plant (Boechera stricta)

Priya Vaidya, Ansley McDurmon, Emily Mattoon, Michaela Keefe, Lauren Carley, Cheng-Ruei Lee, Robin Bingham & Jill T. Anderson
Intraspecific variation in flower color is often attributed to pollinator-mediated selection, yet this mechanism cannot explain flower color polymorphisms in self-pollinating species. Indirect selection mediated via biotic and abiotic stresses could maintain flower color variation in these systems. The selfing forb, Boechera stricta, typically displays white flowers, but some individuals produce purple flowers. We quantified environmental correlates of flower color in natural populations. To disentangle plasticity from genotypic variation, we performed a multiyear field experiment...

Data from: Using host species traits to understand the consequences of resource provisioning for host–parasite interactions

Daniel J. Becker, Daniel G. Streicker & Sonia Altizer
1.Supplemental food provided to wildlife by human activities can be more abundant and predictable than natural resources, and subsequent changes to wildlife ecology can have profound impacts on host–parasite interactions. Identifying traits of species associated with increases or decreases in infection outcomes with resource provisioning could improve assessments of wildlife most prone to disease risks in changing environments. 2.We conducted a phylogenetic meta-analysis of 342 host–parasite interactions across 56 wildlife species and three broad taxonomic...

Data from: Demographic history influences spatial patterns of genetic diversity in recently expanded coyote (Canis latrans) populations

Elizabeth Heppenheimer, Daniela S. Cosio, Kristin E. Brzeski, Danny Caudill, Kyle Van Why, Michael J. Chamberlain, Joseph W. Hinton & Bridgett VonHoldt
Human-mediated range expansions have increased in recent decades and represent unique opportunities to evaluate genetic outcomes of establishing peripheral populations across broad expansion fronts. Over the past century, coyotes (Canis latrans) have undergone a pervasive range expansion and now inhabit every state in the continental United States. Coyote expansion into eastern North America was facilitated by anthropogenic landscape changes and followed two broad expansion fronts. The northern expansion extended through the Great Lakes region and...

Data from: Soil microbial communities alter leaf chemistry and influence allelopathic potential among coexisting plant species

Scott J. Meiners, Kelsey K. Phipps, , Thomas Canam, Walter P. Carson & Thomas H. Pendergast
While both plant–soil feedbacks and allelochemical interactions are key drivers of plant community dynamics, the potential for these two drivers to interact with each other remains largely unexplored. If soil microbes influence allelochemical production, this would represent a novel dimension of heterogeneity in plant–soil feedbacks. To explore the linkage between soil microbial communities and plant chemistry, we experimentally generated soil microbial communities and evaluated their impact on leaf chemical composition and allelopathic potential. Four native...

Data from: Breakdown of a defensive symbiosis, but not endogenous defenses, at elevated temperatures

Matthew R. Doremus, Andrew H. Smith, Kyungsun L. Kim, Angela J. Holder, Jacob A. Russell & Kerry M. Oliver
Environmental factors, including temperature, can have large effects on species interactions, including mutualisms and antagonisms. Most insect species are infected with heritable bacterial symbionts with many protecting their hosts from natural enemies. However, many symbionts or their products are thermally sensitive hence their effectiveness may vary across a range of temperatures. In the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, the bacterial symbiont Hamiltonella defensa, and its associated APSE bacteriophages confer resistance to this aphid's dominant parasitoid, Aphidius...

Data from: Fine-scale variation in microclimate across an urban landscape shapes variation in mosquito population dynamics and the potential of Aedes albopictus to transmit arboviral disease

Courtney C. Murdock, Michelle V. Evans, Taylor D. McClanahan, Kerri L. Miazgowicz & Blanka Tesla
Most statistical and mechanistic models used to predict mosquito-borne disease transmission incorporate climate drivers of disease transmission by utilizing environmental data collected at geographic scales that are potentially coarser than what mosquito populations may actually experience. Temperature and relative humidity can vary greatly between indoor and outdoor environments, and can be influenced strongly by variation in landscape features. In the Aedes albopictus system, we conducted a proof-of-concept study in the vicinity of the University of...

Data from: Predictors and immunological correlates of sublethal mercury exposure in vampire bats

Daniel J. Becker, Matthew M. Chumchal, Alexandra B. Bentz, Steven G. Platt, Gábor A. Czirják, Thomas R. Rainwater, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Mercury (Hg) is a pervasive heavy metal that often enters the environment from anthropogenic sources such as gold mining and agriculture. Chronic exposure to Hg can impair immune function, reducing the ability of animals to resist or recover from infections. How Hg influences immunity and susceptibility remains unknown for bats, which appear immunologically distinct from other mammals and are reservoir hosts of many pathogens of importance to human and animal health. We here quantify total...

Data from: Conservation genetics of the eastern yellow-bellied racer (Coluber constrictor flaviventris) and bullsnake (Pituophis catenifer sayi): river valleys are critical features for snakes at northern range limits

Christopher M. Somers, Carly F. Graham, Jessica A. Martino, Timothy R. Frasier, Stacey L. Lance, Laura E. Gardiner & Ray G. Poulin
On the North American Great Plains, several snake species reach their northern range limit where they rely on sparsely distributed hibernacula located in major river valleys. Independent colonization histories for the river valleys and barriers to gene flow caused by the lack of suitable habitat between them may have produced genetically differentiated snake populations. To test this hypothesis, we used 10 microsatellite loci to examine the population structure of two species of conservation concern in...

Data from: Faunal response to sea-level and climate change in a short-lived seaway: Jurassic of the Western Interior, USA

Silvia Danise & Steven M. Holland
Understanding how regional ecosystems respond to sea-level and environmental perturbations is a main challenge in palaeoecology. Here we use quantitative abundance estimates, integrated within a sequence stratigraphic and environmental framework, to reconstruct benthic community changes through the 13 myr history of the Jurassic Sundance Seaway in the western United States. Sundance Seaway communities are notable for their low richness and high dominance relative to most areas globally in the Jurassic, and this probably reflects steep...

Data from: Naturally-occurring changes in social-cognitive factors modify change in physical activity during early adolescence

Rodney K. Dishman, Marsha Dowda, Kerry L. McIver, Ruth P. Saunders, Russell R. Pate & Rod K. Dishman
Purpose. To determine whether naturally-occurring changes in children's motives and beliefs are associated with the steep decline in physical activity observed from childhood to early adolescence. Methods. Latent growth modeling was applied in longitudinal tests of social-cognitive influences, and their interactions, on physical activity in a large cohort of boys and girls evaluated annually between 5th and 7th grades. Results. Measurement equivalence of motives and beliefs was confirmed between boys and girls. After adjustment for...

Data from: Genetic analyses reveal cryptic diversity in the native North American fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Solenopsis)

Pablo Chialvo, Dietrich A. Gotzek, D. DeWayne Shoemaker, Kenneth G. Ross & DEWAYNE SHOEMAKER
The native North American fire ants (Solenopsis) comprise a difficult group taxonomically that has undergone multiple revisions in the past century yet remains in a state of taxonomic uncertainty. In this study, we utilized a large set of microsatellite markers to conduct the first robust genetic analysis of the nominal species. Our approach used a variety of methods to test operational criteria commonly employed in species delimitation, including genotypic clustering, reproductive isolation/cohesion, and monophyly. We...

Data from: Genetic population structure of the round whitefish (Prosopium cylindraceum) in North America: multiple markers reveal glacial refugia and regional subdivision.

Thomas D. Morgan, Carly F. Graham, Andrew G. McArthur, Amogelang R. Raphenya, Douglas R. Boreham, Richard G. Manzon, Joanna Y. Wilson, Stacey L. Lance, Kimberly L. Howland, Paul H. Patrick & Christopher M. Somers
Round whitefish (Prosopium cylindraceum) have a broad, disjunct range across northern North America and Eurasia, and little is known about their genetic population structure. We performed genetic analyses of round whitefish from 17 sites across its range using nine microsatellites, two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) loci, and 4918 to 8835 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. Our analyses identified deep phylogenetic division between eastern and western portions of the range, likely indicative of origins from at least two...

Data from: Improvement of the threespine stickleback genome using a Hi-C-based Proximity-Guided Assembly

Catherine L. Peichel, Shawn T. Sullivan, Ivan Liachko & Michael A. White
Scaffolding genomes into complete chromosome assemblies remains challenging even with the rapidly increasing sequence coverage generated by current next-generation sequence technologies. Even with scaffolding information, many genome assemblies remain incomplete. The genome of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a fish model system in evolutionary genetics and genomics, is not completely assembled despite scaffolding with high-density linkage maps. Here, we first test the ability of a Hi-C based Proximity-Guided Assembly to perform a de novo genome...

Data from: Range-wide and regional patterns of population structure and genetic diversity in the gopher tortoise

Daniel Gaillard, Joshua R. Ennen, Brian R. Kreiser, Carl P. Qualls, Sarah C. Sweat, Roger Birkhead, Tracey D. Tuberville, Matthew Aresco, Earl D. McCoy, Henry R. Mushinsky, Thomas W. Hentges, B.R. Kreiser, C.P. Qualls, T.D. Tuberville, E.D. McCoy, H.R. Mushinsky & T.W. Hentges
The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) has experienced dramatic population declines throughout its distribution in the southeastern United States and is federally listed as threatened in the area west of the Tombigbee-Mobile Rivers. While there is molecular support for recognizing the listed portion of the range as genetically distinct, other research has suggested that additional population structure exists at both range-wide and regional scales. In this study, we sought to comprehensively define structure at both spatial...

Data from: Generalized spatial mark-resight models with an application to grizzly bears

Jesse Whittington, Mark Hebblewhite & Richard B. Chandler
1. The high cost associated with capture-recapture studies presents a major challenge when monitoring and managing wildlife populations. Recently-developed spatial mark-resight (SMR) models were proposed as a cost-effective alternative because they only require a single marking event. However, existing SMR models ignore the marking process and make the tenuous assumption that marked and unmarked populations have the same encounter probabilities. This assumption will be violated in most situations because the marking process results in different...

Data from: Integrating phylogenomic and population genomic patterns in avian lice provides a more complete picture of parasite evolution

Andrew D. Sweet, Bret M. Boyd, Julie M. Allen, Scott M. Villa, Michel P. Valim, Jose L. Rivera-Parra, Robert E. Wilson & Kevin P. Johnson
Parasite diversity accounts for most of the biodiversity on earth, and is shaped by many processes (e.g. cospeciation, host-switching). To identify the effects of the processes that shape parasite diversity, it is ideal to incorporate both deep (phylogenetic) and shallow (population) perspectives. To this end, we developed a novel workflow to obtain phylogenetic and population genetic data from whole genome sequences of body lice parasitizing New World ground-doves. Phylogenies from these data showed consistent, highly...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    50

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    50

Affiliations

  • University of Georgia
    50
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of Regina
    2
  • Mississippi State University
    2