173 Works

Data from: Geographic patterns of genetic variation in three genomes of North American diploid strawberries with special reference to Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata

Lauren Stanley, Nicole J. Forrester, Rajanikanth Govindarajulu, Aaron Liston & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Geographic patterns of genetic variation in wild species reflect the interplay of ecological and evolutionary processes. We assessed genetic variation in three genomes across four North American diploid strawberry taxa, with special emphasis on the gynodioecious Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata (A.Heller) Staudt. Specifically, we sequenced one chloroplast (rpoC2) and two mitochondrial (atp8 and atp8-orf225) genes along with several nuclear microsatellite markers. In addition, we assessed indicators of breeding system (pollen viability and female frequency) for...

Data from: Invasiveness of plant pathogens depends on the spatial scale of host distribution

Alexey Mikaberidze, Christopher C. Mundt & Sebastian Bonhoeffer
Plant diseases often cause serious yield losses in agriculture. A pathogen’s invasiveness can be quantified by the basic reproductive number, R0. Since pathogen transmission between host plants depends on the spatial separation between them, R0 is strongly influenced by the spatial scale of the host distribution.We present a proof of principle of a novel approach to estimate the basic reproductive number, R0, of plant pathogens as a function of the size of a field planted...

Data from: Geomagnetic field influences upward movement of young Chinook salmon emerging from nests

Nathan F. Putman, Michelle M. Scanlan, Amanda M. Pollock, Joseph P. O'Neil, Ryan B. Couture, Joseph S. Stoner, Thomas P. Quinn, Kenneth J. Lohmann, David L.G. Noakes & David L. G. Noakes
Organisms use a variety of environmental cues to orient their movements in three-dimensional space. Here, we show that the upward movement of young Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) emerging from gravel nests is influenced by the geomagnetic field. Fish in the ambient geomagnetic field travelled farther upwards through substrate than did fish tested in a field with the vertical component inverted. This suggests that the magnetic field is one of several factors that influences emergence from...

Data from: Silicone wristbands detect individuals' pesticide exposures in West Africa

Carey E. Donald, Richard P. Scott, Kathy L. Blaustein, Mary L. Halbleib, Makhfousse Sarr, Paul C. Jepson & Kim A. Anderson
We detected between 2 and 10 pesticides per person with novel sampling devices worn by 35 participants who were actively engaged in farming in Diender, Senegal. Participants were recruited to wear silicone wristbands for each of two separate periods of up to 5 days. Pesticide exposure profiles were highly individualized with only limited associations with demographic data. Using a 63-pesticide dual-column gas chromatography–electron capture detector (GC-ECD) method, we detected pyrethoid insecticides most frequently, followed by...

Data from: Male harassment, female movements, and genetic diversity in a fragmented metapopulation

Paul M. Severns & Greg A. Breed
Interactions with males often alter the short‐term behaviors of reproductive females. Yet, the influence of different internal and external factors, such as sexual conflict, on animal movement and patch dynamics is not well understood. We studied associations between courtship, movements of reproductive females, and genetic diversity in a small, fragmented network of Euphydras editha taylori (Taylor's checkerspot butterfly). In the absence of courtship, female movements (step lengths) were restricted (< 2 m) and tortuous, and...

Data from: Sexual conflict over mating in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) as indicated by experimental manipulation of genitalia

Christopher R. Friesen, Emily J. Uhrig, Mattie K. Squire, Robert T. Mason, Patricia L. R. Brennan, R. T. Mason, E. J. Uhrig, M. K. Squire & C. R. Friesen
Sexual conflict over mating can result in sex specific morphologies and behaviors that allow each sex to exert control over the outcome of reproduction. Genital traits, in particular, are often directly involved in conflict interactions. Via genital manipulation, we experimentally investigated whether genital traits in red-sided garter snakes influence copulation duration and formation of a copulatory plug. The hemipenes of male red-sided garter snakes have a large basal spine that inserts into the female cloaca...

Data from: Phenotype-environment association of the oxygen transport system in trimorphic European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) populations

Melissa L. Evans, Kim Præbel, Stefano Peruzzi, Per-Arne Amundsen & Louis Bernatchez
Replicated adaptive radiation events, typified by phenotypic divergence across resource axes, provide important insight into the eco-evolutionary dynamics that lead to the formation of new species. Here, we show that in trimorphic adaptive radiations of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), divergence of the oxygen transport system has occurred across the pelagic/littoral (shallow)—profundal (deep) resource axis, and at multiple biological scales. Profundal whitefish exhibited significantly larger red blood cells (RBCs), a greater proportion of cathodic hemoglobin protein...

Data from: Mesopredator management: effects of red fox control on the abundance, diet and use of space by feral cats

Robyn Molsher, Alan E. Newsome, Thomas M. Newsome & Christopher R. Dickman
Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators - mesopredators - often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of...

Data from: Female behavior and the interaction of male and female genital traits mediate sperm transfer during mating.

Christopher R. Friesen, Emily J. Uhrig, Robert T. Mason, Patricia L.R. Brennan, C. R. Friesen, E. J. Uhrig & R. T. Mason
Natural selection and post-copulatory sexual selection, including sexual conflict, contribute to genital diversification. Fundamental first steps in understanding how these processes shape the evolution of specific genital traits are to determine their function experimentally and to understand the interactions between female and male genitalia during copulation. Our experimental manipulations of male and female genitalia in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) reveal that copulation duration and copulatory plug deposition, as well as total and oviductal/vaginal...

Data from: Population structure of riverine and coastal dolphins Sotalia fluviatilis and Sotalia guianensis: PATTERNS of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity AND implications for conservation

Susana Caballero, Claudia Hollatz, Sebastian Rodríguez, Fernando Trujillo, C. Scott Baker & C Scott Baker
Coastal and freshwater cetaceans are particularly vulnerable due to their proximity to human activity, localized distributions and small home ranges. These species include Sotalia guianensis, found in the Atlantic and Caribbean coastal areas of central and South America, and Sotalia fluviatilis, distributed in the Amazon River and tributaries. We investigated the population structure and genetic diversity of these two species by analyses of mtDNA control region and 8-10 microsatellite loci. MtDNA analyses revealed strong regional...

Data from: Age-related sex differences in body condition and telomere dynamics of red-sided garter snakes

Nicky Rollings, Emily J. Uhrig, Randolf W. Krohmer, Heather L. Waye, Robert T. Mason, Mats Olsson, Camilla M. Whittington, Christopher R. Friesen & Randolph W. Krohmer
Life-history strategies vary dramatically between the sexes, which may drive divergence in sex-specific senescence and mortality rates. Telomeres are tandem nucleotide repeats that protect the ends of chromosomes from erosion during cell division. Telomeres have been implicated in senescence and mortality because they tend to shorten with stress, growth and age. We investigated age-specific telomere length in female and male red-sided garter snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis. We hypothesized that age-specific telomere length would differ between...

Data from: Topsoil removal through scarification improves natural regeneration in high-graded Nothofagus old-growth forests

Daniel P. Soto & Klaus J. Puettmann
1.High grading by removing the majority of trees with superior timber quality has led to loss of productivity and biodiversity in forests. Typically, after high grading, little attention is given to tree regeneration. Thus, undesirable understory vegetation often dominates for a long time, leading to stagnation in forest recovery and so-called arrested succession. In such settings, managing understory vegetation using topsoil removal through scarification has been proposed as a restoration tool to encourage tree regeneration....

Data from: Influences of fire–vegetation feedbacks and post-fire recovery rates on forest landscape vulnerability to altered fire regimes

Alan J. Tepley, Enrique Thomann, Thomas T. Veblen, George L.W. Perry, Andrés Holz, Juan Paritsis, Thomas Kitzberger, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira & George L. W. Perry
1. In the context of on-going climatic warming, forest landscapes face increasing risk of conversion to non-forest vegetation through alteration of their fire regimes and their post-fire recovery dynamics. However, this pressure could be amplified or dampened, depending on how fire-driven changes to vegetation feed back to alter the extent or behavior of subsequent fires. 2. Here we develop a mathematical model to formalize understanding of how fire–vegetation feedbacks and the time to forest recovery...

Data from: Predator-guided sampling reveals biotic structure in the bathypelagic

Kelly J. Benoit-Bird, Brandon L. Southall & Mark A. Moline
We targeted habitat used differentially by deep-diving, air-breathing predators to empirically sample their prey’s distributions off southern California. Fine-scale measurements of the spatial variability of potential prey animals from the surface to 1200 m were obtained using conventional fisheries echosounders aboard a surface ship and uniquely integrated into a deep-diving autonomous vehicle. Significant spatial variability in the size, composition, total biomass, and spatial organization of biota was evident over all spatial scales examined and was...

Data from: Circumpolar diversity and geographic differentiation of mtDNA in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia)

Angela L. Sremba, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Trevor A. Branch, Rick L. LeDuc & C. Scott Baker
The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) was hunted to near extinction between 1904 and 1972, declining from an estimated initial abundance of more than 250,000 to fewer than 400. Here, we describe mtDNA control region diversity and geographic differentiation in the surviving population of the Antarctic blue whale, using 218 biopsy samples collected under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) during research cruises from 1990–2009. Microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA sequences identified 166...

Data from: Primary rainforest amount at the landscape scale mitigates bird biodiversity loss and biotic homogenization

Urs G. Kormann, Adam S. Hadley, Teja Tscharntke, Matthew G. Betts, W. Douglas Robinson & Christoph Scherber
1.Tropical conservation strategies traditionally focus on large tracts of pristine forests, but given rapid primary forest decline, understanding the role of secondary forest remnants for biodiversity maintenance is critical. Until now, the interactive effects of changes in forest amount, configuration and disturbance history (secondary vs. primary forest) on the conservation value of tropical landscapes has remained unknown, hampering the incorporation of these global change drivers into local and global conservation planning. 2.We disentangled effects of...

Data from: Dynamic occupancy modeling reveals a hierarchy of competition among fishers, grey foxes, and ringtails

David S. Green, Sean M. Matthews, Robert C. Swiers, Richard L. Callas, J. Scott Yaeger, Stuart L. Farber, Michael K. Schwartz, Roger A. Powell & J. Scott Yaeger
1. Determining how species coexist is critical for understanding functional diversity, niche partitioning and interspecific interactions. Identifying the direct and indirect interactions among sympatric carnivores that enable their coexistence are particularly important to elucidate because they are integral for maintaining ecosystem function. 2. We studied the effects of removing 9 fishers (Pekania pennanti) on their population dynamics and used this perturbation to elucidate the interspecific interactions among fishers, grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and ringtails (Bassariscus...

Data from: Eyespots deflect predator attack increasing fitness and promoting the evolution of phenotypic plasticity

Kathleen L. Prudic, Andrew M. Stoehr, Bethany R. Wasik, Antónia Monteiro, K. L. Prudic, B. R. Wasik, A. Monteiro & A. M. Stoehr
Some eyespots are thought to deflect attack away from the vulnerable body, yet there is limited empirical evidence for this function and its adaptive advantage. Here, we demonstrate the conspicuous ventral hindwing eyespots found on Bicyclus anynana butterflies protect against invertebrate predators, specifically praying mantids. Wet season (WS) butterflies with larger, brighter eyespots were easier for mantids to detect, but more difficult to capture compared to dry season (DS) butterflies with small, dull eyespots. Mantids...

Data from: Adaptive genetic markers discriminate migratory runs of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) amid continued gene flow

Kathleen G. O'Malley, Dave P. Jacobson, Ryon Kurth, Allen J. Dill & Michael A. Banks
Neutral genetic markers are routinely used to define distinct units within species that warrant discrete management. Human-induced changes to gene flow however may reduce the power of such an approach. We tested the efficiency of adaptive vs. neutral genetic markers in differentiating temporally divergent migratory runs of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) amid high gene flow owing to artificial propagation and habitat alteration. We compared seven putative migration timing genes to ten microsatellite loci in delineating...

Data from: Physconia labrata, a new species from western North America and Asia

Theodore L. Esslinger, Bruce McCune & Diane L. Haughland
A new species belonging to the lichen genus Physconia is described from Alaska and the Canadian and American Rocky Mountains and adjacent forested regions. It is also reported from China, Nepal, India and Siberia. The new species, Physconia labrata, is superficially similar to P. perisidiosa, but can be distinguished by having a blackened, corticate lower surface and a paraplectenchymatous upper cortex.

Data from: Staying close to home? Genetic differentiation of rough-toothed dolphins near oceanic islands in the central Pacific Ocean

G. Renee Albertson, Robin W. Baird, Marc Oremus, M. Michael Poole, Karen K. Martien & C. Scott Baker
Rough-toothed dolphins have a worldwide tropical and subtropical distribution, yet little is known about the population structure and social organization of this typically open-ocean species. Although it has been assumed that pelagic dolphins range widely due to the lack of apparent barriers and unpredictable prey distribution, recent evidence suggests rough-toothed dolphins exhibit fidelity to some oceanic islands. Using the most comprehensively extensive dataset for this species to date, we assess the isolation and interchange of...

Data from: Identification of candidate effector genes of Pratylenchus penetrans

Paulo Vieira, Thomas Mayer, Sebastian Eves-Van Den Akker, Dana K. Howe, Inga Zasada, Thomas Baum, Jonathan D. Eisenback, Kathryn Kamo, Thomas R. Maier & Thomas J. Baum
Pratylenchus penetrans is one of the most important species among root lesion nematodes (RLNs) due to the detrimental and economic impact that it causes in a wide range of crops. Similar to other plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), P. penetrans harbors a significant number of secreted proteins that play key roles during parasitism. Here we combined spatially and temporally resolved next generation sequencing datasets of P. penetrans to select a list of candidate genes aimed at the...

Data from: Influence of sediment characteristics on the composition of soft-sediment intertidal communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

Kyle E. Coblentz, Jessica R. Henkel, Bryan J. Sigel & Caz M. Taylor
Benthic infaunal communities are important components of coastal ecosystems. Understanding the relationships between the structure of these communities and characteristics of the habitat in which they live is becoming progressively more important as coastal systems face increasing stress from anthropogenic impacts and changes in climate. To examine how sediment characteristics and infaunal community composition were related along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, we sampled intertidal infaunal communities at seven sites covering common habitat types...

Data from: An integrated approach to historical population assessment of the great whales: case of the New Zealand southern right whale

Jennifer A. Jackson, Emma L. Carroll, Tim D. Smith, Alex N. Zerbini, Nathalie J. Patenaude & C. Scott Baker
Accurate estimation of historical abundance provides an essential baseline for judging the recovery of the great whales. This is particularly challenging for whales hunted prior to twentieth century modern whaling, as population-level catch records are often incomplete. Assessments of whale recovery using pre-modern exploitation indices are therefore rare, despite the intensive, global nature of nineteenth century whaling. Right whales (Eubalaena spp.) were particularly exploited: slow swimmers with strong fidelity to sheltered calving bays, the species...

Data from: Forest fragmentation and loss reduce richness, availability, and specialization in tropical hummingbird communities

Adam S. Hadley, Sarah J. K. Frey, W. Douglas Robinson & Matthew G. Betts
Hummingbirds are important pollinators of many native Neotropical plants but their abundance and diversity in landscapes dominated by intensive human uses such as agriculture have rarely been examined, despite such land-uses prevailing in the tropics. We examined how tropical deforestation affects hummingbird community structure in premontane forest patches embedded in a tropical countryside of Coto Brus Canton, Costa Rica. We captured hummingbirds in fourteen landscapes representing a gradient in patch size and forest amount, and...

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