31 Works

Data from: Populations of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) with different evolutionary histories differ in their climate occupancy

Burke T. Greer, Christopher Still, Glenn T. Howe, Christina Tague & Dar A. Roberts
Quaking aspens (Populus tremuloides Michx.) are found in diverse habitats throughout North America. While the biogeography of aspens' distribution has been documented, the drivers of the phenotypic diversity of aspen are still being explored. In our study, we examined differences in climate between northern and southwestern populations of aspen, finding large-scale differences between the populations. Our results suggest that northern and southwestern populations live in distinct climates and support the inclusion of genetic and phenotypic...

Data from: Potentially adaptive mitochondrial haplotypes as a tool to identify divergent nuclear loci

Michael R. Garvin, William D. Templin, Anthony J. Gharrett, Nick DeCovich, Christine M. Kondzela, Jeffrey R. Guyon & Megan V. McPhee
1. Genetic tools are commonly used for conservation and management of at-risk species. Individuals are often sampled from mixtures composed of many populations, which creates a need to assign individuals to their source. This can be problematic when the genetic divergence among source populations is weak but can be improved using adaptive genetic loci, which should show stronger levels of divergence. 2. We previously reported a signature of positive selection in the mitochondrial-encoded ND5 subunit...

Data from: Genetic signatures of ecological diversity along an urbanization gradient

Ryan P. Kelly, James L. O'Donnell, Natalie C. Lowell, Andrew O. Shelton, Jameal F. Samhouri, Shannon M. Hennessey, Blake E. Feist & Gregory D. Williams
Despite decades of work in environmental science and ecology, estimating human influences on ecosystems remains challenging. This is partly due to complex chains of causation among ecosystem elements, exacerbated by the difficulty of collecting biological data at sufficient spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales. Here, we demonstrate the utility of environmental DNA (eDNA) for quantifying associations between human land use and changes in an adjacent ecosystem. We analyze metazoan eDNA sequences from water sampled in nearshore...

Data from: Rapid divergence and convergence of life-history in experimentally evolved Drosophila melanogaster

Molly K. Burke, Thomas T. Barter, Larry G. Cabral, James N. Kezos, Mark A. Phillips, Grant A. Rutledge, Kevin H. Phung, Richard H. Chen, Huy D. Nguyen, Laurence D. Mueller & Michael R. Rose
Laboratory selection experiments are alluring in their simplicity, power, and ability to inform us about how evolution works. A longstanding challenge facing evolution experiments with metazoans is that significant generational turnover takes a long time. In this work, we present data from a unique system of experimentally evolved laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster that have experienced three distinct life-history selection regimes. The goal of our study was to determine how quickly populations of a certain...

Data from: Phylogenetic context determines the role of competition in adaptive radiation

Jiaqi Tan, Matthew R. Slattery, Xian Yang & Lin Jiang
Understanding ecological mechanisms regulating the evolution of biodiversity is of much interest to ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Adaptive radiation constitutes an important evolutionary process that generates biodiversity. Competition has long been thought to influence adaptive radiation, but the directionality of its effect and associated mechanisms remain ambiguous. Here, we report a rigorous experimental test of the role of competition on adaptive radiation using the rapidly evolving bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 interacting with multiple bacterial species...

Data from: Silicone wristbands detect individuals' pesticide exposures in West Africa

Carey E. Donald, Richard P. Scott, Kathy L. Blaustein, Mary L. Halbleib, Makhfousse Sarr, Paul C. Jepson & Kim A. Anderson
We detected between 2 and 10 pesticides per person with novel sampling devices worn by 35 participants who were actively engaged in farming in Diender, Senegal. Participants were recruited to wear silicone wristbands for each of two separate periods of up to 5 days. Pesticide exposure profiles were highly individualized with only limited associations with demographic data. Using a 63-pesticide dual-column gas chromatography–electron capture detector (GC-ECD) method, we detected pyrethoid insecticides most frequently, followed by...

Data from: Mesopredator management: effects of red fox control on the abundance, diet and use of space by feral cats

Robyn Molsher, Alan E. Newsome, Thomas M. Newsome & Christopher R. Dickman
Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators - mesopredators - often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of...

Data from: Female behavior and the interaction of male and female genital traits mediate sperm transfer during mating.

Christopher R. Friesen, Emily J. Uhrig, Robert T. Mason, Patricia L.R. Brennan, C. R. Friesen, E. J. Uhrig & R. T. Mason
Natural selection and post-copulatory sexual selection, including sexual conflict, contribute to genital diversification. Fundamental first steps in understanding how these processes shape the evolution of specific genital traits are to determine their function experimentally and to understand the interactions between female and male genitalia during copulation. Our experimental manipulations of male and female genitalia in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) reveal that copulation duration and copulatory plug deposition, as well as total and oviductal/vaginal...

Data from: Predator-guided sampling reveals biotic structure in the bathypelagic

Kelly J. Benoit-Bird, Brandon L. Southall & Mark A. Moline
We targeted habitat used differentially by deep-diving, air-breathing predators to empirically sample their prey’s distributions off southern California. Fine-scale measurements of the spatial variability of potential prey animals from the surface to 1200 m were obtained using conventional fisheries echosounders aboard a surface ship and uniquely integrated into a deep-diving autonomous vehicle. Significant spatial variability in the size, composition, total biomass, and spatial organization of biota was evident over all spatial scales examined and was...

Data from: Staying close to home? Genetic differentiation of rough-toothed dolphins near oceanic islands in the central Pacific Ocean

G. Renee Albertson, Robin W. Baird, Marc Oremus, M. Michael Poole, Karen K. Martien & C. Scott Baker
Rough-toothed dolphins have a worldwide tropical and subtropical distribution, yet little is known about the population structure and social organization of this typically open-ocean species. Although it has been assumed that pelagic dolphins range widely due to the lack of apparent barriers and unpredictable prey distribution, recent evidence suggests rough-toothed dolphins exhibit fidelity to some oceanic islands. Using the most comprehensively extensive dataset for this species to date, we assess the isolation and interchange of...

Data from: An integrated approach to historical population assessment of the great whales: case of the New Zealand southern right whale

Jennifer A. Jackson, Emma L. Carroll, Tim D. Smith, Alex N. Zerbini, Nathalie J. Patenaude & C. Scott Baker
Accurate estimation of historical abundance provides an essential baseline for judging the recovery of the great whales. This is particularly challenging for whales hunted prior to twentieth century modern whaling, as population-level catch records are often incomplete. Assessments of whale recovery using pre-modern exploitation indices are therefore rare, despite the intensive, global nature of nineteenth century whaling. Right whales (Eubalaena spp.) were particularly exploited: slow swimmers with strong fidelity to sheltered calving bays, the species...

Data from: Herbivory enhances the diversity of primary producers in pond ecosystems

Mathew A. Leibold, Spencer R. Hall, Val H. Smith & David A. Lytle
Diversity of primary producer is often surprisingly high, despite few limiting factors such as nutrients and light to facilitate species coexistence. In theory, the presence of herbivores could increase the diversity of primary producers, resolving this “paradox of the plankton”. Little experimental evidence supports this natural enemies hypothesis, but previous tests suffer from several deficiencies. Previous experiments often did not allow for multigeneration effects; utilized low diversity assemblages of herbivores; and limited opportunities for new...

Data from: Evidence for ship noise impacts on humpback whale foraging behaviour

Hannah B. Blair, Nathan D. Merchant, Ari S. Friedlaender, David N. Wiley & Susan E. Parks
Noise from shipping activity in North Atlantic coastal waters has been steadily increasing and is an area of growing conservation concern, as it has the potential to disrupt the behaviour of marine organisms. This study examines the impacts of ship noise on bottom foraging humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the western North Atlantic. Data were collected from 10 foraging whales using non-invasive archival tags that simultaneously recorded underwater movements and the acoustic environment at the...

Data from: Experimental insight into the process of parasite community assembly

Sarah A. Budischak, Eric P. Hoberg, Art Abrams, Anna E. Jolles & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
1.Community assembly is a fundamental process that has long been a central focus in ecology. Extending community assembly theory to communities of co-infecting parasites, we used a gastrointestinal nematode removal experiment in free-ranging African buffalo to examine community assembly patterns and processes. 2.We first asked whether reassembled communities differ from undisturbed communities by comparing anthelmintic-treated and control hosts. Next, we examined the temporal dynamics of assembly using a cross-section of communities that reassembled for different...

Data from: Plant diversity enhances moth diversity in an intensive forest management experiment

Heather T. Root, Jake Verschuyl, Thomas Stokely, Paul Hammond, Melissa A. Scherr & Matthew G. Betts
Intensive forest management (IFM) promises to help satisfy increasing global demand for wood, but may come at the cost of local reductions to forest biodiversity. IFM often reduces early seral plant diversity as a result of efforts to eliminate plant competition with crop trees. If diversity is a function of bottom-up drivers, theory predicts that specialists at lower trophic levels (e.g., insect herbivores) should be particularly sensitive to reductions in plant diversity. We conducted a...

Data from: Success despite the stress: violet-green swallows increase glucocorticoids and maintain reproductive output despite experimental increases in flight costs

James W. Rivers, Gretchen N. Newberry, Carl J. Schwarz & Daniel R. Ardia
Glucocorticoid steroid hormones play a central role in regulating the metabolic state of animals, especially when they cope with unanticipated stressors in their environment. The cort-adaptation hypothesis predicts that baseline concentrations of glucocorticoids are adjusted upward to match energetic needs and promote fitness when individuals are faced with physiological challenges, including those associated with reproduction. We tested the cort-adaptation hypothesis in the violet-green swallow (Tachycineta thalassina) by experimentally increasing flight costs during the offspring rearing...

Data from: The spatial dynamics of predators and the benefits and costs of sharing information

Matthieu Barbier & James R. Watson
Predators of all kinds, be they lions hunting in the Serengeti or fishermen searching for their catch, display various collective strategies. A common strategy is to share information about the location of prey. However, depending on the spatial characteristics and mobility of predators and prey, information sharing can either improve or hinder individual success. Here, our goal is to investigate the interacting effects of space and information sharing on predation efficiency, represented by the expected...

Data from: Closing a gap in tropical forest biomass estimation: taking crown mass variation into account in pantropical allometries

Pierre Ploton, Nicholas Barbier, Stéphane Takoudjou Momo, Maxime Réjou-Méchain, Faustin Boyemba Bosela, Georges Chuyong, Gilles Dauby, Vincent Droissart, Adeline Fayolle, Rosa Calisto Goodman, Mathieu Henry, Narcisse Guy Kamdem, John Katembo Mukirania, David Kenfack, Moses Libalah, Alfred Ngomanda, Vivien Rossi, Bonaventure Sonké, Nicolas Texier, Duncan Thomas, Donatien Zebaze, Pierre Couteron, Uta Berger & Raphaël Pélissier
Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is an outstanding challenge. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most tropical forest carbon studies. In particular, a pantropical biomass model has been widely used for approximately a decade, and its most recent version will certainly constitute a reference in the coming years. However, this reference model shows a systematic bias for the largest trees. Because large trees are...

Data from: Timber harvest and tree size near nests explains variation in nest site occupancy but not productivity in northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis)

Sabrina A. Rodriguez, Patricia L. Kennedy & Timothy H. Parker
Conservation concern for the northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) reflects evidence that goshawks may abandon nest sites or suffer from reduced nesting success in response to some forms of timber harvest. However, this evidence is mixed and has yet to be reviewed systemically and quantitatively. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the extent to which timber harvest and tree size explain variation in goshawk productivity and site occupancy. Goshawk productivity was not significantly explained by...

Data from: What influences the worldwide genetic structure of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus)?

Alana Alexander, Debbie Steel, Kendra Hoekzema, Sarah L. Mesnick, Daniel Engelhaupt, Iain Kerr, Roger Payne, Charles Scott Baker & C. Scott Baker
The interplay of natural selection and genetic drift, influenced by geographic isolation, mating systems and population size, determines patterns of genetic diversity within species. The sperm whale provides an interesting example of a long-lived species with few geographic barriers to dispersal. Worldwide mtDNA diversity is relatively low, but highly structured among geographic regions and social groups, attributed to female philopatry. However, it is unclear whether this female philopatry is due to geographic regions or social...

Data from: Tropical forest fragmentation limits movements, but not occurrence of a generalist pollinator species

Noelia L. Volpe, W. Douglas Robinson, Sarah J. K. Frey, Adam S. Hadley & Matthew G. Betts
Habitat loss and fragmentation influence species distributions and therefore ecological processes that depend upon them. Pollination may be particularly susceptible to fragmentation, as it depends on frequent pollinator movement. Unfortunately, most pollinators are too small to track efficiently which has precluded testing the hypothesis that habitat fragmentation reduces or eliminates pollen flow by disrupting pollinator movement. We used radio-telemetry to examine space use of the green hermit hummingbird (Phaethornis guy), an important 'hub' pollinator of...

Data from: Limitations of species delimitation based on phylogenetic analyses: a case study in the (Hypogymnia hypotrypa) group (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota)

Xinli Wei, Bruce McCune, H. Thorsten Lumbsch, Hui Li, Steven Leavitt, Yoshikazu Yamamoto, Svetlana Tchabanenko & Jiangchun Wei
Delimiting species boundaries among closely related lineages often requires a range of independent data sets and analytical approaches. Similar to other organismal groups, robust species circumscriptions in fungi are increasingly investigated within an empirical framework. Here we attempt to delimit species boundaries in a closely related clade of lichen-forming fungi endemic to Asia, the Hypogymnia hypotrypa group (Parmeliaceae). In the current classification, the Hypogymnia hypotrypa group includes two species: H. hypotrypa and H. flavida, which...

Data from: Corridors restore animal-mediated pollination in fragmented tropical forest landscapes

Urs Kormann, Christoph Scherber, Teja Tscharntke, Nadja Klein, Manuel Larbig, Jonahon Valente, Adam Hadley, Matthew Betts, Matthew G. Betts, Adam S. Hadley & Jonathon J. Valente
Tropical biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions have become heavily eroded through habitat loss. Animal-mediated pollination is required in >94% of higher tropical plant species and 75% of the world´s leading food crops, but it remains unclear if corridors avert deforestation-driven pollination breakdown in fragmented tropical landscapes. Here, we used manipulative resource experiments and field observations to show that corridors functionally connect neotropical forest fragments for forest-associated hummingbirds and increase pollen transfer. Further, corridors boosted forest-associated...

Data from: Interactive influences of climate change and agriculture on aquatic habitat in a Pacific Northwestern watershed

Sandra J. DeBano, David. E. Wooster, Jonathan R. Walker, Laura E. McMullen, Donald A. Horneck & David E. Wooster
Climate change and agricultural intensification are two potential stressors that may pose significant threats to aquatic habitats in the inland Pacific Northwest over the next century. Climate change may impact running water through numerous pathways, including effects on water temperature and stream flow. In certain regions of the Pacific Northwest, agricultural activities, such as crop production, may become more profitable if water projects result in more irrigation water. If so, riparian buffers in these areas...

Data from: Within guild co-infections influence parasite community membership: a longitudinal study in African Buffalo

Brian Henrichs, Marinda C. Oosthuizen, Milana Troskie, Erin Gorsich, Carmen Gondhalekar, Brianna Beechler, Vanessa O. Ezenwa, Anna E. Jolles & Brianna R. Beechler
1. Experimental studies in laboratory settings have demonstrated a critical role of parasite interactions in shaping parasite communities. The sum of these interactions can produce diverse effects on individual hosts as well as influence disease emergence and persistence at the population level. 2. A predictive framework for the effects of parasite interactions in the wild remains elusive, largely because of limited longitudinal or experimental data on parasite communities of free-ranging hosts. 3. This four year...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • Oregon State University
    31
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • University of Sydney
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of Auckland
    2
  • University of Liège
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • University of Wollongong
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • Weber State University
    1