45 Works

Data from: Phylogenomics and the evolution of hemipteroid insects

Kevin P. Johnson, Christopher H. Dietrich, Frank Friedrich, Rolf G. Beutel, Benjamin Wipfler, Ralph S. Peters, Julie M. Allen, Malte Petersen, Alexander Donath, Kimberly K. O. Walden, Alexey M. Kozlov, Lars Podsiadlowski, Christoph Mayer, Karen Meusemann, Alexandros Vasilikopoulos, Robert M. Waterhouse, Stephen L. Cameron, Christiane Weirauch, Daniel R. Swanson, Diana M. Percy, Nate B. Hardy, Irene Terry, Shanlin Liu, Xin Zhou, Bernhard Misof … & Kazunori Yoshizawa
Hemipteroid insects (Paraneoptera), with over 10% of all known insect diversity, are a major component of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Previous phylogenetic analyses have not consistently resolved the relationships among major hemipteroid lineages. We provide maximum likelihood-based phylogenomic analyses of a taxonomically comprehensive dataset comprising sequences of 2,395 single-copy, protein-coding genes for 193 samples of hemipteroid insects and outgroups. These analyses yield a well-supported phylogeny for hemipteroid insects. Monophyly of each of the three hemipteroid...

Data from: The influence of wing morphology upon the dispersal, geographical distributions and diversification of the Corvides (Aves; Passeriformes)

Jonathan D. Kennedy, Michael K. Borregaard, Knud Andreas Jønsson, Petter Z. Marki, Jon Fjeldså & Carsten Rahbek
New species are sometimes known to arise as a consequence of the dispersal and establishment of populations in new areas. It has nevertheless been difficult to demonstrate an empirical link between rates of dispersal and diversification, partly because dispersal abilities are challenging to quantify. Here, using wing morphology as a proxy for dispersal ability, we assess this relationship among the global radiation of corvoid birds. We found that species distributions are associated with wing shape....

Support for the habitat amount hypothesis from a global synthesis of species density studies

James Watling, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Marion Pfeifer, Lander Baeten, Cristina Banks-Leite, Laura Cisneros, Rebecca Fang, Caroli Hamel-Leigue, Thibault Lachat, Inara Leal, Luc Lens, Hugh Possingham, Dinarzarde Raheem, Danilo Ribeiro, Eleanor Slade, Nicolas Urbina-Cardona, Eric Wood & Lenore Fahrig
Decades of research suggest that species richness depends on spatial characteristics of habitat patches, especially their size and isolation. In contrast, the habitat amount hypothesis predicts that: 1) species richness in plots of fixed size (species density) is more strongly and positively related to the amount of habitat around the plot than to patch size or isolation; 2) habitat amount better predicts species density than patch size and isolation combined, 3) there is no effect...

Data from: Tracing the patterns of non-marine turtle richness from Triassic–Palaeogene: from origin through global spread

Terri Cleary, Roger Benson, Patricia Holroyd & Paul Barrett
Turtles are key components of modern vertebrate faunas and it is predicted that their diversity and distributions will be affected by anthropogenic climate change. Despite this, few studies have attempted to provide baseline data on turtle taxonomic richness through time or assess their past responses to global environmental change. We used the extensive Triassic–Palaeogene (252–23 Ma) fossil record of terrestrial and freshwater turtles to investigate diversity patterns, finding substantial variation in richness through time and...

Data from: Global distribution of Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus among clinically healthy sea turtles

Alonzo Alfaro-Núñez, Mads Frost Bertelsen, Anders Miki Bojesen, Isabel Rasmussen, Lisandra Zepeda-Mendoza, Morten Tange Olsen & Marcus Thomas Pius Gilbert
Background: Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease characterized by cutaneous tumours that has been documented to infect all sea turtle species. Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV) is believed to be the aetiological agent of FP, based principally on consistent PCR-based detection of herpesvirus DNA sequences from FP tumours. We used a recently described PCR-based assay that targets 3 conserved CFPHV genes, to survey 208 green turtles (Chelonia mydas). This included both FP tumour exhibiting, and clinically...

Data from: The role of the endemic and critically endangered Colorful Puffleg Eriocnemis mirabilis in plant-hummingbird networks of the Colombian Andes

Mónica B. Ramírez-Burbano, F. Gary Stiles, Catalina González, Felipe W. Amorim, Bo Dalsgaard, Pietro K. Maruyama. & Pietro K. Maruyama
Ecological network approaches may contribute to conservation practices by quantifying within-community importance of species. In mutualistic plant-pollinator systems, such networks reflect potential pollination of the plants and a considerable portion of the energy consumption by the pollinators, two key components for each party. Here, we used two different sampling approaches to describe mutualistic plant-hummingbird networks from a cloud forest in the Colombian Western Andes, home to the Colorful Puffleg Eriocnemis mirabilis, an endemic and critically...

Data from: From success to persistence: Identifying an evolutionary regime shift in the diverse Paleozoic aquatic arthropod group Eurypterida, driven by the Devonian biotic crisis

James C. Lamsdell & Paul A. Selden
Mass extinctions have altered the trajectory of evolution a number of times over the Phanerozoic. During these periods of biotic upheaval a different selective regime appears to operate, although it is still unclear whether consistent survivorship rules apply across different extinction events. We compare variations in diversity and disparity across the evolutionary history of a major Paleozoic arthropod group, the Eurypterida. Using these data, we explore the group's transition from a successful, dynamic clade to...

Data from: GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms

Joanne M. Bennett, Piero Calosi, Susana Clusella-Trullas, Brezo Martínez, Jennifer Sunday, Adam C. Algar, Miguel B. Araújo, Bradford A. Hawkins, Sally Keith, Ingolf Kühn, Carsten Rahbek, Laura Rodríguez, Alexander Singer, Fabricio Villalobos, Miguel Ángel Olalla-Tárraga & Ignacio Morales-Castilla
How climate affects species distributions is a longstanding question receiving renewed interest owing to the need to predict the impacts of global warming on biodiversity. Is climate change forcing species to live near their critical thermal limits? Are these limits likely to change through natural selection? These and other important questions can be addressed with models relating geographical distributions of species with climate data, but inferences made with these models are highly contingent on non-climatic...

Data from: Early Cretaceous gymnolaemate bryozoans from the early to middle Albian of the Glen Rose and Walnut formations of Texas, USA

Silviu O. Martha, Paul D. Taylor & William L. Rader
Gymnolaemate bryozoans are common encrusters on bivalve shells from the early to middle Albian parts of the Glen Rose and Walnut formations of southcentral and northcentral Texas. Here, we report for the first time the presence of seven gymnolaemate bryozoans, all of which represent new species. They include the bioimmured ctenostome Simplicidium jontoddi n. sp., and the cheilostomes Rhammatopora glenrosa n. sp., Iyarispora ikaanakiteeh n. gen. n. sp., Iyarispora chiass n. gen. n. sp., Charixa...

Data from: Evaluating the impact of domestication and captivity on the horse gut microbiome

Jessica L. Metcalf, Se Jin Song, James T. Morton, Sophie Weiss, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Frédéric Joly, Claudia Feh, Pierre Taberlet, Eric Coissac, Amnon Amir, Eske Willerslev, Rob Knight, Valerie McKenzie & Ludovic Orlando
The mammal gut microbiome, which includes host microbes and their respective genes, is now recognized as an essential second genome that provides critical functions to the host. In humans, studies have revealed that lifestyle strongly influences the composition and diversity of the gastrointestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that these trends in humans may be paralleled in mammals subjected to anthropogenic forces such as domestication and captivity, in which diets and natural life histories are often greatly...

Data from: The first skeletal record of the enigmatic Cretaceous sawfish genus Ptychotrygon (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea) from the Turonian of Morocco

Eduardo Villalobos-Segura, Charlie Underwood & David Ward
A new fossil batoid (ray) Ptychotrygon rostrispatula sp. nov. is described from five exceptionally well-preserved, three-dimensional skeletal remains from the Turonian (Late Cretaceous) of Morocco. These specimens represent the first known skeletal remains for the genus Ptychotrygon and allow an almost complete description of the genus providing a new insight to its phylogenetic relations and validate its taxonomic status as a member of the Sclerorhynchoidei. Mechanical preparation of the fossil remains revealed a relatively large...

Data from: Fine-scale appendage structure of the Cambrian trilobitomorph Naraoia spinosa and its ontogenetic and ecological implications

Dayou Zhai, Gregory Edgecombe, Andrew Bond, Huijuan Mai, Xianguang Hou & Yu Liu
Trilobitomorphs are a species-rich Palaeozoic arthropod assemblage that unites trilobites with several other lineages that share similar appendage structure. Post-embryonic development of the exoskeleton is well documented for some trilobitomorphs, especially trilobites, but little is known of the ontogeny of their soft parts, limiting understanding of their autecology. Here we document appendage structure of the Cambrian naraoiid trilobitomorph Naraoia spinosa by computed microtomography, resulting in three-dimensional reconstructions of appendages at both juvenile and adult stages....

Revisiting a landmark study-system: no evidence for a punctuated mode of evolution in Metrarabdotos

Kjetil Voje, Emanuela Di Martino & Arthur Porto
Is speciation generally a ‘special time’ in morphological evolution or are lineage splitting events just ‘more of the same’ where the end product happens to be two separate lineages? Data on evolutionary dynamics during anagenetic and cladogenetic events among closely related lineages within a clade are rare, but the fossil record of the bryozoan genus Metrarabdotos is considered a textbook example of a clade where speciation causes rapid evolutionary change against a backdrop of morphological...

Data from: Evolutionary prediction of medicinal properties in the genus Euphorbia L.

Madeleine Ernst, C. Haris Saslis-Lagoudakis, Olwen M. Grace, Niclas Nilsson, Henrik Toft Simonsen, James W. Horn & Nina Rønsted
The current decrease of new drugs brought to the market has fostered renewed interest in plant-based drug discovery. Given the alarming rate of biodiversity loss, systematic methodologies in finding new plant-derived drugs are urgently needed. Medicinal uses of plants were proposed as proxy for bioactivity, and phylogenetic patterns in medicinal plant uses have suggested that phylogeny can be used as predictive tool. However, the common practice of grouping medicinal plant uses into standardised categories may...

Data from: Evolutionary patterns and processes: lessons from ancient DNA

Michela Leonardi, Pablo Librado, Clio Der Sarkissian, Mikkel Schubert, Ahmed H. Alfarhan, Saleh A. Alquraishi, Khaled A. S. Al-Rasheid, Cristina Gamba, Eske Willerslev & Ludovic Orlando
Ever since its emergence in 1984, the field of ancient DNA has struggled to overcome the challenges related to the decay of DNA molecules in the fossil record. With the recent development of high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies and molecular techniques tailored to ultra-damaged templates, it has now come of age, merging together approaches in phylogenomics, population genomics, epigenomics, and metagenomics. Leveraging on complete temporal sample series, ancient DNA provides direct access to the most important...

Data from: A total-evidence approach to dating with fossils, applied to the early radiation of the Hymenoptera

Fredrik Ronquist, Seraina Klopfstein, Lars Vilhelmsen, Susanne Schulmeister, Debra L. Murray & Alexandr P. Rasnitsyn
Phylogenies are usually dated by calibrating interior nodes against the fossil record. This relies on indirect methods that, in the worst case, misrepresent the fossil information. Here, we contrast such node dating with an approach that includes fossils along with the extant taxa in a Bayesian total-evidence analysis. As a test case, we focus on the early radiation of the Hymenoptera, mostly documented by poorly preserved impression fossils that are difficult to place phylogenetically. Specifically,...

Data from: Population characteristics of a large whale shark aggregation inferred from seawater environmental DNA

Eva Egelyng Sigsgaard, Ida Broman Nielsen, Steffen Sanvig Bach, Eline D. Lorenzen, David Philip Robinson, Steen Wilhelm Knudsen, Mikkel Winther Pedersen, Mohammed Al Jaidah, Ludovic Orlando, Eske Willerslev, Peter Rask Møller & Philip Francis Thomsen
Population genetics is essential for understanding and managing marine ecosystems, but sampling remains challenging. We demonstrate that high-throughput sequencing of seawater environmental DNA can provide useful estimates of genetic diversity in a whale shark (Rhincodon typus) aggregation. We recover similar mitochondrial haplotype frequencies in seawater compared to tissue samples, reliably placing the studied aggregation in a global genetic context and expanding the applications of environmental DNA to encompass population genetics of aquatic organisms.

Data from: Time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of pteropods

Alice K. Burridge, Christine Hörnlein, Arie W. Janssen, Martin Hughes, Stephanie L. Bush, Ferdinand Marlétaz, Rebeca Gasca, Annelies C. Pierrot-Bults, Ellinor Michel, Jonathan A. Todd, Jeremy R. Young, Karen J. Osborn, Steph B.J. Menken, Katja T.C.A. Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A. Peijnenburg & Steph B. J. Menken
Pteropods are a widespread group of holoplanktonic gastropod molluscs and are uniquely suitable for study of long-term evolutionary processes in the open ocean because they are the only living metazoan plankton with a good fossil record. Pteropods have been proposed as bioindicators to monitor the impacts of ocean acidification and in consequence have attracted considerable research interest, however, a robust evolutionary framework for the group is still lacking. Here we reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and...

Data from: Identification of transcription factor genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis in carrot (Daucus carota L.) using RNA-Seq

Miyako Kodama, Henrik Brinch-Pedersen, Shrikant Sharma, Inger Bæksted Holme, Bjarne Joernsgaard, Tsaneta Dzhanfezova, Daniel Buchvaldt Amby, Filipe Garrett Vieira, Shanlin Liu & M. Thomas P. Gilbert
Background Anthocyanins are water-soluble colored flavonoids present in multiple organs of various plant species including flowers, fruits, leaves, stems and roots. DNA-binding R2R3-MYB transcription factors, basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors, and WD40 repeat proteins are known to form MYB-bHLH-WD repeat (MBW) complexes, which activates the transcription of structural genes in the anthocyanin pathway. Although black cultivars of carrots (Daucus carota L.) can accumulate large quantities of anthocyanin in their storage roots, the regulatory genes responsible...

Data from: Diet variability among insular populations of Podarcis lizards reveals diverse strategies to face resource-limited environments

Maxime Taverne, Anne-Claire Fabre, Nina King-Gillies, Marija Krajnović, Duje Lisičić, Louise Martin, Leslie Michal, Donat Petricioli, Anamaria Stambuk, Zoran Tadić, Chloé Vigliotti, Beck Wehrle & Anthony Herrel
Access to resources is a dynamic and multi-causal process that determines the success and survival of a population. It is therefore often challenging to disentangle the factors affecting ecological traits like diet. Insular habitats provide a good opportunity to study how variation in diet originates, in particular in populations of mesopredators such as lizards. Indeed, high levels of population density associated with low food abundance and low predation are selection pressures typically observed on islands....

Drought and presence of ants can influence hemipitera in tropical leaf litter

Anna Goldman, Timothy Bonebrake, Theodore Evans, Hannah Griffiths, Catherine Parr, Louise Ashton & Paul Eggleton
Climate change is predicted to impact tropical rainforests, with droughts becoming more frequent and more severe in some regions. We currently have a poor understanding of how increased drought will change the functioning of tropical rainforest. In particular, tropical rainforest invertebrates, which are numerous and biologically important, may respond to drought in different ways across trophic levels. Ants are a diverse group that carry out important ecosystem processes, shaping ecosystem structure and function through predation...

Ancient mitogenomics clarifies radiation of extinct Mascarene giant tortoises (Cylindraspis spp.)

Christian Kehlmaier, Eva Graciá, Patrick D. Campbell, Margaretha D. Hofmeyr, Silke Schweiger, Albert Martínez-Silvestre, Walter Joyce & Uwe Fritz
The five extinct giant tortoises of the genus Cylindraspis belong to the most iconic species of the enigmatic fauna of the Mascarene Islands that went largely extinct after the discovery of the islands. To resolve the phylogeny and biogeography of Cylindraspis, we analysed a data set of 45 mitogenomes that includes all lineages of extant tortoises and eight near-complete sequences of all Mascarene species extracted from historic and subfossil material. Cylindraspis is an ancient lineage...

Formation binning: a new method for increased temporal resolution in regional studies, applied to the Late Cretaceous dinosaur fossil record of North America

Christopher Dean, A. Alessandro Chiarenza & Susannah Maidment
The advent of palaeontological occurrence databases has allowed for detailed reconstruction and analyses of species richness through deep time. While a substantial literature has evolved ensuring that taxa are fairly counted within and between different time periods, how time itself is divided has received less attention. Stage-level or equal-interval age bins have been frequently used for regional and global studies in vertebrate palaeontology. However, when assessing diversity at a regional scale, these resolutions can prove...

Data from: Is diagnosability an indicator of speciation? Response to ‘Why one century of phenetics is enough’

Rasmus Heller, Peter Frandsen, Eline Dierdre Lorenzen, Hans R. Siegismund & Eline Deirdre Lorenzen
Recently (Heller et al. 2013; H&A), we commented on a revision of the bovid taxonomy, which proposes a doubling in the number of recognized species (Groves and Grubb 2011; G&G). The subsequent response by Cotterill et al. (2014; C&A) contains a number of misunderstandings and leaves much of the critique voiced in our paper unanswered, focusing instead on species ontologies and taxonomic history. C&A argue strongly against phenetics, morphospecies and taxonomic conservatism, ascribing us views...

Data from: Arthropod diversity in a tropical forest

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, François Guilhaumon, Olivier Missa, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Jürgen Schmidl, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jon R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H. C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan … & Maurice Leponce
Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6,144 arthropod species from 0.48 ha and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas...

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