273 Works

Data from: Special features of RAD Sequencing data: implications for genotyping

John W. Davey, Timothée Cezard, Pablo Fuentes-Utrilla, Cathlene Eland, Karim Gharbi & Mark L. Blaxter
RAD Sequencing (RAD-Seq) is an economical and efficient method for SNP discovery and genotyping. As with other sequencing-by-synthesis methods, RAD-Seq produces stochastic count data and requires sensitive analysis to develop or genotype markers accurately. We show that there are several sources of bias specific to RAD-Seq that are not explicitly addressed by current genotyping tools, namely restriction fragment bias, restriction site heterozygosity and PCR GC content bias. We explore the performance of existing analysis tools...

Data from: Developing reduced SNP assays from whole-genome sequence data to estimate introgression in an organism with complex genetic patterns, the Iberian honeybee (Apis mellifera iberiensis)

Dora Henriques, Melanie Parejo, Alain Vignal, David Wragg, Andreas Wallberg, Matthew Webster, M. Alice Pinto & Matthew T. Webster
The most important managed pollinator, the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.), has been subject to a growing number of threats. In Western Europe one such threat is large-scale introductions of commercial strains (C-lineage ancestry), which is leading to introgressive hybridization and even the local extinction of native honeybee populations (M-lineage ancestry). Here, we developed reduced assays of highly informative SNPs from 176 whole genomes to estimate C-lineage introgression in the most diverse and evolutionarily complex subspecies...

Data from: Using targeted enrichment of nuclear genes to increase phylogenetic resolution in the neotropical rain forest genus Inga (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

James A. Nicholls, R. Toby Pennington, Erik J. Koenen, Colin E. Hughes, Jack Hearn, Lynsey Bunnefeld, Kyle G. Dexter, Graham N. Stone, Catherine A. Kidner & Erik J. M. Koenen
Evolutionary radiations are prominent and pervasive across many plant lineages in diverse geographical and ecological settings; in neotropical rainforests there is growing evidence suggesting that a significant fraction of species richness is the result of recent radiations. Understanding the evolutionary trajectories and mechanisms underlying these radiations demands much greater phylogenetic resolution than is currently available for these groups. The neotropical tree genus Inga (Leguminosae) is a good example, with ~300 extant species and a crown...

Data from: The relative efficiency of modular and non-modular networks of different size

Colin R. Tosh, Luke McNally, L. McNally & C. R. Tosh
Most biological networks are modular but previous work with small model networks has indicated that modularity does not necessarily lead to increased functional efficiency. Most biological networks are large, however, and here we examine the relative functional efficiency of modular and non-modular neural networks at a range of sizes. We conduct a detailed analysis of efficiency in networks of two size classes: ‘small’ and ‘large’, and a less detailed analysis across a range of network...

Data from: Morphology of the petrosal and stapes of Borealestes (Mammaliaformes, Docodonta) from the Middle Jurassic of Skye, Scotland

Elsa Panciroli, Julia A. Schultz & Zhe-Xi Luo
\We describe, in unprecedented detail, the petrosals and stapes of the docodont Borealestes from the Middle Jurassic of Scotland, using high resolution μCT and phase‐contrast synchrotron imaging. We describe the inner ear endocast and the vascularized interior structure of the petrosal, and provide the first endocranial view of a docodontan petrosal. Our study confirms some similarities in petrosal and stapedial morphology with the better known Haldanodon of the Late Jurassic of Portugal, including: (1) the...

Data from: Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

Trevor Bedford, Marc A. Suchard, Philippe Lemey, Gytis Dudas, Victoria Gregory, Alan J. Hay, John W. McCauley, Colin A. Russell, Derek J. Smith, Andrew Rambaut, Colin A Russell, Alan J Hay, John W McCauley, Derek J Smith & Marc A Suchard
Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata,...

Data from: Signatures of diversifying selection in European pig breeds

Samantha Wilkinson, Zen H. Lu, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Alan L. Archibald, Chris Haley, Ian J. Jackson, Martien A. M. Groenen, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans, Rob Ogden & Pamela Wiener
Porcine_60K_Data_Wilkinsonetal2013.tarMapping and variant calling data on SSC5:98000000-99000000This file shares the same REAME as SSC11_53500000-55500000.tarSSC5_98000000-99000000.tarMapping and variant calling data on SSC5:3100000-34000000This file shares the same REAME as SSC11_53500000-55500000.tarSSC5_3100000-34000000.tarMapping and variant calling data on SSC11:53500000-55500000SSC11_53500000-55500000.tar

Data from: High levels of interspecific gene flow in an endemic cichlid fish adaptive radiation from an extreme lake environment

Antonia G. P. Ford, Kanchon K. Dasmahapatra, Lukas Rüber, Karim Gharbi, Timothée Cezard & Julia J. Day
Studying recent adaptive radiations in isolated insular systems avoids complicating causal events and thus may offer clearer insight into mechanisms generating biological diversity. Here, we investigate evolutionary relationships and genomic differentiation within the recent radiation of Alcolapia cichlid fish that exhibit extensive phenotypic diversification, and which are confined to the extreme soda lakes Magadi and Natron in East Africa. We generated an extensive RAD data set of 96 individuals from multiple sampling sites and found...

Data from: RAD-mapping reveals an evolving, polymorphic and fuzzy boundary of a plant pseudoautosomal region

Suo Qiu, Roberta Bergero, Sara Guirao-Rico, Jose L. Campos, Timothée Cezard, Karim Gharbi, Deborah Charlesworth, S. Qiu, R. Bergero, S. Guirao-Rico, J. L. Campos, T. Cezard, K. Gharbi & D. Charlesworth
How loss of genetic exchanges (recombination) evolves between sex chromosomes is a long-standing question. Suppressed recombination may evolve when a sexually antagonistic (SA) polymorphism occurs in a partially sex-linked, “pseudo-autosomal’ region (or “PAR”), maintaining allele frequency differences between the two sexes, and creating selection for closer linkage with the fully sex-linked region of the Y chromosome in XY systems, or the W in ZW sex chromosome systems. Most evidence consistent with the SA polymorphism hypothesis...

Data from: Opposing patterns of intraspecific and interspecific differentiation in sex chromosomes and autosomes

Peter A. Moran, Sonia Pascoal, Timothée Cezard, Judith E. Risse, Michael G. Ritchie & Nathan W. Bailey
Linking intraspecific and interspecific divergence is an important challenge in speciation research. X chromosomes are expected to evolve faster than autosomes and disproportionately contribute to reproductive barriers, and comparing genetic variation on X and autosomal markers within and between species can elucidate evolutionary processes that shape genome variation. We performed RADseq on a 16-population transect of two closely-related Australian cricket species, Teleogryllus commodus and T. oceanicus, covering allopatry and sympatry. This classic study system for...

Data from: Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets

Rhodri S. Wilson, Lei Yang, Alison Dun, Annya M. Smyth, Rory R. Duncan, Colin Rickman & Weiping Lu
Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable...

Data from: Introgression and the fate of domesticated genes in a wild mammal population

Philine G. D. Feulner, Jacob Gratten, James W. Kijas, Peter M. Visscher, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jon Slate & Jon. Slate
When domesticated species are not reproductively isolated from their wild relatives, the opportunity arises for artificially selected variants to be re-introduced into the wild. However, the evolutionary consequences of introgression of domesticated genes back into the wild are poorly understood. By combining high-throughput genotyping with 25 years of long-term ecological field data, we describe the occurrence and consequences of admixture between a primitive sheep breed, the free-living Soay sheep of St Kilda, and more modern...

Data from: Accounting for female space sharing in St. Kilda Soay sheep (Ovis aries) results in little change in heritability estimates

Charlotte E. Regan, Jill G. Pilkington, Camillo Bérénos, Josephine M. Pemberton, Per T. Smiseth & Alastair J. Wilson
When estimating heritability in free-living populations, it is common practice to account for common environment effects, because of their potential to generate phenotypic covariance among relatives thereby biasing heritability estimates. In quantitative genetic studies of natural populations, however, philopatry, which results in relatives being clustered in space, is rarely accounted for. The two studies to have done so suggest absolute declines in heritability estimates of up to 43% when accounting for space sharing by relatives....

Data from: Mass production of SNP markers in a nonmodel passerine bird through RAD sequencing and contig mapping to the zebra finch genome

Yann X. C. Bourgeois, Emeline Lhuillier, Timothée Cézard, Joris A. M. Bertrand, Boris Delahaie, Josselin Cornuault, Thomas Duval, Olivier Bouchez, Borja Milá & Christophe Thébaud
Here, we present an adaptation of restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) to the Illumina HiSeq2000 technology that we used to produce SNP markers in very large quantities at low cost per unit in the Réunion grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus), a nonmodel passerine bird species with no reference genome. We sequenced a set of six pools of 18–25 individuals using a single sequencing lane. This allowed us to build around 600 000 contigs, among which at least...

Data from: Para-allopatry in hybridizing fire-bellied toads (Bombina bombina and B. variegata): inference from transcriptome-wide coalescence analyses

Beate Nürnberger, Konrad Lohse, Anna Fijarczyk, Jacek M. Szymura & Mark L. Blaxter
Ancient origins, profound ecological divergence, and extensive hybridization make the fire-bellied toads Bombina bombina and B. variegata (Anura: Bombinatoridae) an intriguing test case of ecological speciation. Previous modeling has proposed that the narrow Bombina hybrid zones represent strong barriers to neutral introgression. We test this prediction by inferring the rate of gene exchange between pure populations on either side of the intensively studied Kraków transect. We developed a method to extract high confidence sets of...

Data from: Genetics and genomics of an unusual selfish sex ratio distortion in an insect

Phineas T. Hamilton, Christina N. Hodson, Caitlin I. Curtis & Steve J. Perlman
Diverse selfish genetic elements have evolved the ability to manipulate reproduction to increase their transmission, and this can result in highly distorted sex ratios. Indeed, one of the major explanations for why sex determination systems are so dynamic is because they are shaped by ongoing coevolutionary arms races between sex ratio distorting elements and the rest of the genome. Here, we use genetic crosses and genome analysis to describe an unusual sex ratio distortion with...

Data from: Signatures of selection for environmental adaptation and zebu x taurine hybrid fitness in East African Shorthorn Zebu

Hussain Bahbahani, Abdulfatai Tijjani, Christopher Mukasa, David Wragg, Faisal Almathen, Oyekanmi Nash, Gerald N. Akpa, Mary Mbole-Kariuki, Sunir Malla, Mark Woolhouse, Tad Sonstegard, Curtis Van Tassell, Martin Blythe, Heather Huson & Olivier Hanotte
The East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) cattle are ancient hybrid between Asian zebu × African taurine cattle preferred by local farmers due to their adaptability to the African environment. The genetic controls of these adaptabilities are not clearly understood yet. Here, we genotyped 92 EASZ samples from Kenya (KEASZ) with more than 770,000 SNPs and sequenced the genome of a pool of 10 KEASZ. We observe an even admixed autosomal zebu × taurine genomic structure...

Data from: Formin is associated with left-right asymmetry in the pond snail and the frog

Angus Davison, Gary S. McDowell, Jennifer M. Holden, Harriet F. Johnson, Georgios D. Koutsovoulos, M. Maureen Liu, Paco Hulpiau, Frans Van Roy, Christopher M. Wade, Ruby Banerjee, Fengtang Yang, Satoshi Chiba, John W. Davey, Daniel J. Jackson, Michael Levin & Mark L. Blaxter
While components of the pathway that establishes left-right asymmetry have been identified in diverse animals, from vertebrates to flies, it is striking that the genes involved in the first symmetry-breaking step remain wholly unknown in the most obviously chiral animals, the gastropod snails. Previously, research on snails was used to show that left-right signaling of Nodal, downstream of symmetry breaking, may be an ancestral feature of the Bilateria. Here, we report that a disabling mutation...

Data from: Fold or hold: experimental evolution in vitro

Sinead Collins, Andrew Rambaut, Stephen J. Bridgett, S. Collins, A. Rambaut & S. J. Bridgett
We introduce a system for experimental evolution consisting of populations of short oligonucleotides (Oli populations) evolving in a modified quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). It is tractable at the genetic, genomic, phenotypic and fitness levels. The Oli system uses DNA hairpins designed to form structures that self-prime under defined conditions. Selection acts on the phenotype of self-priming, after which differences in fitness are amplified and quantified using qPCR. We outline the methodological and bioinformatics tools...

Data from: The cranial endocast of Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi) and the interrelationships of stem-group lungfishes

Alice M. Clement, Tom J. Challands, John A. Long & Per E. Ahlberg
The first virtual cranial endocast of a lungfish from the Early Devonian, Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi, is described. Dipnorhynchus, only the fourth Devonian lungfish for which a near complete cranial endocast is known, is a key taxon for clarifying primitive character states within the group. A ventrally-expanded telencephalic cavity is present in the endocast of Dipnorhynchus demonstrating that this is the primitive state for “true” Dipnoi. Dipnorhynchus also possesses a utricular recess differentiated from the sacculolagenar pouch...

Data from: Conserved genetic architecture underlying recombination rate variation in a wild population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries)

Susan E. Johnston, Camillo Bérénos, Jon Slate & Josephine M. Pemberton
Meiotic recombination breaks down linkage disequilibrium and forms new haplotypes, meaning that it is an important driver of diversity in eukaryotic genomes. Understanding the causes of variation in recombination rate is important in interpreting and predicting evolutionary phenomena and for understanding the potential of a population to respond to selection. However, despite attention in model systems, there remains little data on how recombination rate varies at the individual level in natural populations. Here, we used...

Data from: Molecular palaeontology illuminates the evolution of ecdysozoan vision

James F. Fleming, Reinhardt M. Kristensen, Martin V. Sørensen, Tae-Yoon S. Park, Kazuharu Arakawa, Mark Blaxter, Lorena Rebecchi, Roberto Guidetti, Tom A. Williams, Nicholas W. Roberts, Jakob Vinther & Davide Pisani
Colour vision is known to have arisen only twice – once in Vertebrata and once within the Ecdysozoa, in Arthropoda. However, the evolutionary history of ecdysozoan vision is unclear. At the molecular level, visual pigments, composed of a chromophore and a protein belonging to the opsin family, have different spectral sensitivities and these mediate colour vision. At the morphological level, ecdysozoan vision is conveyed by eyes of variable levels of complexity; from the simple ocelli...

Local Authority Engagement in UK Energy Systems

Margaret Tingey
The Local Engagement in UK Energy Systems (LEUKES) Database is about local authority energy projects. The data being made available is a database of 458 UK local authority energy projects collated from 29 different data sources.

Registration Year

  • 2011
    4
  • 2012
    8
  • 2013
    19
  • 2014
    30
  • 2015
    42
  • 2016
    44
  • 2017
    52
  • 2018
    47
  • 2019
    17
  • 2020
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    270
  • Text
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    273
  • University of Exeter
    23
  • University of Oxford
    23
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    21
  • University of Cambridge
    18
  • University of Sheffield
    18
  • University of Glasgow
    14
  • University of Sussex
    10
  • Australian National University
    8
  • Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
    8
  • University of St Andrews
    7
  • University of Aberdeen
    6
  • University of Leeds
    6
  • University of Liverpool
    6
  • Princeton University
    5