42 Works

Data from: Low but significant genetic differentiation underlies biologically meaningful phenotypic divergence in a large Atlantic salmon population

Tutku Aykanat, Susan E. Johnston, Eero Niemelä, Panu Orell, Jaakko Erkinaro & Craig R. Primmer
Despite decades of research assessing the genetic structure of natural populations, the biological meaning of low yet significant genetic divergence often remains unclear due to a lack of associated phenotypic and ecological information. At the same time, structured populations with low genetic divergence and overlapping boundaries can potentially provide excellent models to study adaptation and reproductive isolation in cases where high-resolution genetic markers and relevant phenotypic and life history information are available. Here, we combined...

Data from: The kinetochore prevents centromere-proximal crossover recombination during meiosis

Nadine Vincenten, Lisa-Marie Kuhl, Isabel Lam, Ashwini Oke, Alastair R. W. Kerr, Andreas Hochwagen, Jennifer C. Fung, Scott Keeney, Gerben Vader & Adèle L. Marston
During meiosis, crossover recombination is essential to link homologous chromosomes and drive 22 faithful chromosome segregation. Crossover recombination is non-random across the genome, 23 and centromere-proximal crossovers are associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy, 24 including Trisomy 21 in humans. Here, we identify the conserved Ctf19/CCAN kinetochore sub- 25 complex as a major factor that minimizes potentially deleterious centromere-proximal crossovers 26 in budding yeast. We uncover multi-layered suppression of pericentromeric recombination by the 27...

Data from: Contrasting responses of male and female foraging effort to year-round wind conditions

Sue Lewis, Richard A. Phillips, Sarah J. Burthe, Sarah Wanless & Francis Daunt
1. There is growing interest in the effects of wind on wild animals, given evidence that wind speeds are increasing and becoming more variable in some regions, particularly at temperate latitudes. Wind may alter movement patterns or foraging ability, with consequences for energy budgets and, ultimately, demographic rates. 2. These effects are expected to vary among individuals due to intrinsic factors such as sex, age or feeding proficiency. Furthermore, this variation is predicted to become...

Data from: Hybridisation in closely related Rhododendron species: half of all species differentiating markers experience serious transmission ratio distortion

Tobias Marczewski, David F. Chamberlain & Richard I. Milne
An increasing number of studies of hybridization in recent years have revealed that complete reproductive isolation between species is frequently not finalized in more or less closely related organisms. Most of these species do, however, seem to retain their phenotypical characteristics despite the implication of gene flow, highlighting the remaining gap in our knowledge of how much of an organism's genome is permeable to gene flow, and which factors promote or prevent hybridization. We used...

Data from: Are molecular markers useful predictors of adaptive potential?

Elizabeth A. Mittell, Shinichi Nakagawa & Jarrod D. Hadfield
Estimates of molecular genetic variation are often used as a cheap and simple surrogate for a population's adaptive potential, yet empirical evidence suggests they are unlikely to be a valid proxy. However, this evidence is based on molecular genetic variation poorly predicting estimates of adaptive potential rather than how well it predicts true values. As a consequence, the relationship has been systematically underestimated and the precision with which it could be measured severely overstated. By...

Data from: Genome-wide tests for introgression between cactophilic Drosophila implicate a role of inversions during speciation

Konrad Lohse, Magnus Clarke, Michael G. Ritchie & William J. Etges
Models of speciation-with-gene-flow have shown that the reduction in recombination between alternative chromosome arrangements can facilitate the fixation of locally adaptive genes in the face of gene flow and contribute to speciation. However, it has proven frustratingly difficult to show empirically that inversions have reduced gene flow and arose during or shortly after the onset of species divergence rather than represent ancestral polymorphisms. Here we present an analysis of whole genome data from a pair...

Data from: Adaptive divergence in the monkey flower Mimulus guttatus is maintained by a chromosomal inversion

Alex Twyford, Jannice Friedman & Alex D. Twyford
Organisms exhibit an incredible diversity of life history strategies as adaptive responses to environmental variation. The establishment of novel life history strategies involves multilocus polymorphisms, which will be challenging to establish in the face of gene flow and recombination. Theory predicts that adaptive allelic combinations may be maintained and spread if they occur in genomic regions of reduced recombination, such as chromosomal inversion polymorphisms, yet empirical support for this prediction is lacking. Here, we use...

Data from: Crowdsourcing the identification of organisms: a case-study of iSpot

Jonathan Silvertown, Martin Harvey, Richard Greenwood, Mike Dodd, Jon Rosewell, Tony Rebelo, Janice Ansine & Kevin McConway
Accurate species identification is fundamental to biodiversity science, but the natural history skills required for this are neglected in formal education at all levels. In this paper we describe how the web application ispotnature.org and its sister site ispot.org.za (collectively, "iSpot") are helping to solve this problem by combining learning technology with crowdsourcing to connect beginners with experts. Over 94% of observations submitted to iSpot receive a determination. To date (2014), iSpot has crowdsourced the...

Data from: Using an insect mushroom body circuit to encode route memory in complex natural environments

Paul Ardin, Fei Peng, Michael Mangan, Konstantinos Lagogiannis & Barbara Webb
Ants, like many other animals, use visual memory to follow extended routes through complex environments, but it is unknown how their small brains implement this capability. The mushroom body neuropils have been identified as a crucial memory circuit in the insect brain, but their function has mostly been explored for simple olfactory association tasks. We show that a spiking neural model of this circuit originally developed to describe fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster) olfactory association, can also...

Data from: Integrated radar and lidar analysis reveals extensive loss of remaining intact forest on Sumatra 2007–2010

Murray B. Collins, Edward T. A. Mitchard, E. T. A. Mitchard & M. B. Collins
Forests with high above ground biomass (AGB), including those growing on peat swamps, have historically not been thought suitable for biomass mapping and change detection using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). However, by integrating L-band (λ = 0.23 m) SAR with lidar data from the ALOS and ICESat earth-observing satellites respectively, and 56 forest plots, we were able to create a forest biomass and change map for a 10.7 Mha section of eastern Sumatra that still...

Data from: Age, oxidative stress exposure and fitness in a long-lived seabird

Katherine A. Herborn, Francis Daunt, Britt J. Heidinger, Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Sarah J. Burthe, Mark A. Newell & Pat Monaghan
The need to manage exposure to oxidative stress, which can damage macromolecules, is thought to influence the resolution of life history trade-offs. Oxidative damage is expected to increase with age as a consequence of changes in the optimal investment in defences or repair, and/or because of senescence in antioxidant defence systems, though the pattern might differ between short and long-lived species. However, data on age related changes in damage levels in wild populations are rare....

Data from: Asynchronous hatching provides females with a means for increasing male care but incurs a cost by reducing offspring fitness

Lucy E. Ford, Per T. Smiseth, L. E. Ford & P. T. Smiseth
In species with biparental care, sexual conflict occurs because the benefit of care depends on the total amount of care provided by the two parents while the cost of care depends on each parent’s own contribution. Asynchronous hatching may play a role in mediating the resolution of this conflict over parental care. The sexual conflict hypothesis for the evolution of asynchronous hatching suggests that females adjust hatching patterns in order to increase male parental effort...

Data from: Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures

Ida E. Bailey, André Backes, Patrick T. Walsh, Kate V. Morgan, Simone L. Meddle & Susan D. Healy
In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual...

Data from: Phylogenetic eigenvectors and non-stationarity in the evolution of theropod dinosaur skulls

Jose A. F. Diniz-Filho, Davi M. C. C. Alves, Fabricio Villalobos, Manabu Sakamoto, Steve L. Brusatte, Luis M. Bini, M. Sakamoto, S. L. Brusatte, J. A. F. Diniz-Filho, F. Villalobos, L. M. Bini & D. M. C. C. Alves
Despite the longstanding interest in non-stationarity of both phenotypic evolution and diversification rates, only recently have methods been developed to study this property. Here, we propose a methodological expansion of the Phylogenetic Signal Representation (PSR) curve based on phylogenetic eigenvectors to test for non-stationarity. The PSR is built by plotting the coefficients of determination R2 from Phylogenetic Eigenvector Regression (PVR) models increasing the number of phylogenetic eigenvectors against the accumulated eigenvalues. The PSR curve is...

Data from: Bacterial cooperation causes systematic errors in pathogen risk assessment due to the failure of the independent action hypothesis

Daniel M. Cornforth, Andrew Matthews, Sam P. Brown & Ben Raymond
The Independent Action Hypothesis (IAH) states that pathogenic individuals (cells, spores, virus particles etc.) behave independently of each other, so that each has an independent probability of causing systemic infection or death. The IAH is not just of basic scientific interest; it forms the basis of our current estimates of infectious disease risk in humans. Despite the important role of the IAH in managing disease interventions for food and water-borne pathogens, experimental support for the...

Data from: The cranial endocast of the Middle Devonian dipnonan Dipterus valenciennesi and a fossilized dipnoan otoconial mass

Tom J. Challands & Thomas J. Challands
The well known Middle Devonian (Eifelian–Givetian) lungfish Dipterus valenciennesi from Scotland, UK, has been studied for more than one hundred years though our understanding of the neurocranium and cranial cavity is incomplete. Micro-CT scanning demonstrates that the internal cast of the cranial cavity, the endocast, possesses a mix of primitive and derived characters. The olfactory bulbs are sessile, as in the derived extant Lepidosirenidae. However, Dipterus valenciennesi possesses the primitive condition of a shallow telencephalon...

Data from: Conflict of interest and signal interference lead to the breakdown of honest signalling

Roman Popat, Eric Pollitt, Freya J. G. Harrison, Hardeep Naghra, Kar-Wai Hong, Kok-Gan Chan, Ashleigh S. Griffin, Paul Williams, Sam P. Brown, Stuart A. West, Stephen P. Diggle, Eric J. G. Pollitt & Freya Harrison
Animals use signals to coordinate a wide range of behaviours, from feeding offspring to predator avoidance. This poses an evolutionary problem, because individuals could potentially signal dishonestly to coerce others into behaving in ways that benefit the signaller. Theory suggests that honest signalling is favoured when individuals share a common interest and signals carry reliable information. Here, we exploit the opportunities offered by bacterial signalling, to test these predictions with an experimental evolution approach. We...

Data from: Expression of parasite genetic variation changes over the course of infection: implications of within-host dynamics for the evolution of virulence

Melanie Clerc, M. Clerc, D. Ebert & M. D. Hall
How infectious disease agents interact with their host changes during the course of infection and can alter the expression of disease-related traits. Yet by measuring parasite life-history traits at one or few moments during infection, studies have overlooked the impact of variable parasite growth trajectories on disease evolution. Here we show that infection-age-specific estimates of host and parasite fitness components can reveal new insight into the evolution of parasites. We do so by characterizing the...

Data from: Indirect effects of parasitism: costs of infection to other individuals can be greater than direct costs borne by the host

Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Sarah J. Burthe, Sue Lewis, Katherine A. Herborn, Emi A. Takahashi, Francis Daunt & Emma J. A. Cunningham
Parasitic infection has a direct physiological cost to hosts but may also alter how hosts interact with other individuals in their environment. Such indirect effects may alter both host fitness and the fitness of other individuals in the host's social network, yet the relative impact of direct and indirect effects of infection are rarely quantified. During reproduction, a host's social environment includes family members who may be in conflict over resource allocation. In such situations,...

Data from: Parental age influences offspring telomere loss

Britt J. Heidinger, Katherine A. Herborn, Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Winnie Boner, Sarah Burthe, Mark Newell, Sarah Wanless, Francis Daunt, Pat Monaghan & Hanna M.V. Granroth-Wilding
The age of the parents at the time of offspring production can influence offspring longevity, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The effect of parental age on offspring telomere dynamics (length and loss rate) is one mechanism that could be important in this context. Parental age might influence the telomere length that offspring inherit or age-related differences in the quality of parental care could influence the rate of offspring telomere loss. However, these routes...

Data from: How integrated are behavioural and endocrine stress response traits? A repeated measures approach to testing the stress coping style model

Kay Boulton, Elsa Couto, Andrew J. Grimmer, Ryan L. Earley, Adelino V.M. Canario, Alastair J. Wilson, Craig A. Walling & Adelino V. M. Canario
It is widely expected that physiological and behavioral stress responses will be integrated within divergent stress-coping styles (SCS) and that these may represent opposite ends of a continuously varying reactive–proactive axis. If such a model is valid, then stress response traits should be repeatable and physiological and behavioral responses should also change in an integrated manner along a major axis of among-individual variation. While there is some evidence of association between endocrine and behavioral stress...

Data from: Epigenetic mutations can both help and hinder adaptive evolution

Ilkka Kronholm & Sinéad Collins
Epigenetic variation is being integrated into our understanding of adaptation, yet we lack models on how epigenetic mutations affect evolution that includes de novo genetic change. We model the effects of epigenetic mutations on the dynamics and endpoints of adaptive walks-a process where a series of beneficial mutations move a population towards a fitness optimum. We use an individual-based model of an asexual population, where mutational effects are drawn from Fisher's geometric model. We find...

Data from: The influence of nonrandom extra-pair paternity on heritability estimates derived from wild pedigrees

Josh A. Firth, Jarrod D. Hadfield, Anna W. Santure, Jon Slate & Ben C. Sheldon
Quantitative genetic analysis is often fundamental for understanding evolutionary processes in wild populations. Avian populations provide a model system due to the relative ease of inferring relatedness amongst individuals through observation. However, extra-pair paternity (EPP) creates erroneous links within the social pedigree. Previous work has suggested this causes minor underestimation of heritability if paternal misassignment is random and hence not influenced by the trait being studied. Nevertheless, much literature suggests numerous traits are associated with...

Data from: Unified pre- and postsynaptic long-term plasticity enables reliable and flexible learning

Rui Ponte Costa, Robert C. Froemke, Per Jesper Sjöström & Mark C. W. Van Rossum
Although it is well known that long-term synaptic plasticity can be expressed both pre- and postsynaptically, the functional consequences of this arrangement have remained elusive. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity with both pre- and postsynaptic expression develops receptive fields with reduced variability and improved discriminability compared to postsynaptic plasticity alone. These long-term modifications in receptive field statistics match recent sensory perception experiments. Moreover, learning with this form of plasticity leaves a hidden postsynaptic memory trace...

Data from: Plasma markers of oxidative stress are uncorrelated in a wild mammal

Louise L. Christensen, Colin Selman, Jonathan D. Blount, Jill G. Pilkington, Kathryn A. Watt, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jane M. Reid & Daniel H. Nussey
Oxidative stress, which results from an imbalance between the production of potentially damaging reactive oxygen species versus antioxidant defenses and repair mechanisms, has been proposed as an important mediator of life-history trade-offs. A plethora of biomarkers associated with oxidative stress exist, but few ecological studies have examined the relationships among different markers in organisms experiencing natural conditions or tested whether those relationships are stable across different environments and demographic groups. It is therefore not clear...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    42

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    42

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    42
  • University of Glasgow
    5
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    4
  • University of St Andrews
    3
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • New York University
    2
  • McGill University
    2
  • University of Leeds
    2
  • Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • South African National Biodiversity Institute
    1
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    1