47 Works

Scenarios of future land use change in Mozambique (2014 and 2015)

P. Zorrilla-Miras, J. Matediane, M. Mahamane, I. Nhantumbo, R. Varela, M.J. Metzger & G. Patenaude
Data comprise scenarios of how land use can be in the future and how will it affect ecosystem services in rural Mozambique. The scenarios were constructed from information gathered at five workshops held in Maputo, Xai Xai, Quelimane and Lichinga in 2014 and 2015. The objective of the workshops was to examine aspects that influence well-being (e.g. ecosystem services) and their causes (e.g. change in land use) in the Miombo woodland area of rural Mozambique...

Causal diagrams linking rural well-being with forest ecosystem services in Mozambique (2014 and 2015)

P. Zorrilla-Miras, J. Matediane, M. Mahamane, I. Nhantumbo, R. Varela, M.J. Metzger & G. Patenaude
Data comprise causal diagrams which show links between aspects that influence the well-being of rural inhabitants (e.g. good quality of food, good family relationships, education, etc) with ecosystem services (e.g. food from trees, wood sticks for construction, firewood, wood for charcoal production, etc.) and their causes (e.g. change in land use) in rural Mozambique. Information was gathered at 20 workshops held in Maputo, Xai Xai, Lichinga, Quelimane, and at village level in the districts of...

Woody biomass maps of Mabalane, Gurue, and Maruppa, Mozambique

C. Ryan & I. McNicol
The data consist of woody biomass maps of three study areas - Mabalane, Gurue, and Maruppa in Mozambique. Each area map comprises three Geotiff layers stacked in the order band 1= 2007, band 2 = 2010, band 3 = 2014. Each pixel is an aboveground woody biomass in tonnes of carbon per hectare (ha). For the biomass maps -18.00000 means no data. Due to noise, it is possible to have negative biomass estimates. Individual layers...

Static chamber measurements of nitrous oxide flux from Sourhope field experiment site, Scotland, 2000-2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

C.A. Davies & U. Skiba
The dataset comprises nitrous oxide (N2O) flux data, collected from static chambers as part of a study to determine how land management affected nitrogen cycling by nitrifiers and denitrifiers in an upland agricultural grassland soil and to determine the effects of changing environmental conditions on nitric and nitrous oxide production and emission as a result of land management. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and...

Data from: Sexually dimorphic gene expression and transcriptome evolution provides mixed evidence for a fast‐Z effect in Heliconius

Ana Pinharanda, Marjolaine Rousselle, Simon H. Martin, Joseph J. Hanly, John W. Davey, Sujai Kumar, Nicolas Galtier, Chris D. Jiggins & Joe J. Hanly
Sex chromosomes have different evolutionary properties compared to autosomes due to their hemizygous nature. In particular, recessive mutations are more readily exposed to selection, which can lead to faster rates of molecular evolution. Here, we report patterns of gene expression and molecular evolution for a group of butterflies. First, we improve the completeness of the Heliconius melpomene reference annotation, a neotropical butterfly with a ZW sex determination system. Then, we analyse RNA from male and...

Data from: Detailed insights into pan-European population structure and inbreeding in wild and hatchery Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) populations revealed by genome-wide SNP data

David L.J. Vendrami, Ross D. Houston, Karim Gharbi, Luca Telesca, Alejandro P. Gutierrez, Helen Gurney-Smith, Natsuki Hasegawa, Pierre Boudry, Joseph I. Hoffman & David L. J. Vendrami
Cultivated bivalves are hugely important not only because of their economic value, but also due to their impacts on natural ecosystems. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is the world's most heavily cultivated shellfish species and has been introduced to all continents except Antarctica for aquaculture. We therefore used a medium density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to investigate the genetic structure of this species in Europe, where it was introduced during the 1960s and has...

Data from: Estimating selection on the act of inbreeding in a population with strong inbreeding depression

Eva Troianou, Jisca Huisman, Josephine M. Pemberton & Craig A. Walling
Inbreeding depression is widely regarded as a driving force in the evolution of dispersal, mate choice and sperm selection. However, due to likely costs of inbreeding avoidance, which are poorly understood, it is unclear to what extent selection to avoid inbreeding is expected in nature. Moreover, there are currently very few empirical estimates of the strength of selection against the act of inbreeding (mating with a relative), as opposed to the fitness costs of being...

Data from: Distinguishing the victim from the threat: SNP‐based methods reveal the extent of introgressive hybridization between wildcats and domestic cats in Scotland and inform future in situ and ex situ management options for species restoration

Helen V. Senn, Muhammad Ghazali, Jennifer Kaden, David Barcaly, Ben Harrower, Ruairidh D. Campbell, David W. MacDonald, Andrew C. Kitchener & David Barclay
The degree of introgressive hybridisation between the Scottish wildcat and domestic cat has long been suspected to be advanced. Here we use a 35-SNP-marker test, designed to assess hybridisation between wildcat and domestic cat populations in Scotland, to assess a database of 265 wild-living and captive cat samples, and test the assumptions of the test using 3097 SNP markers generated independently in a subset of the data using ddRAD. We discovered that despite increased genetic...

Data from: Reconciling nutritional geometry with classical dietary restriction: effects of nutrient intake, not calories, on survival and reproduction

Joshua P. Moatt, Murray A. Fyfe, Elizabeth Heap, Luke J.M. Mitchell, Fiona Moon, Craig A. Walling & Luke J. M. Mitchell
Dietary restriction (DR) is one of the main experimental paradigms to investigate the mechanisms that determine lifespan and ageing. Yet, the exact nutritional parameters responsible for DR remain unclear. Recently, the advent of the geometric framework of nutrition (GF), has refocussed interest from calories to dietary macronutrients. However, GF experiments focus on invertebrates, with the importance of macronutrients in vertebrates still widely debated. This has led to the suggestion of a fundamental difference in the...

Data from: Adaptive periodicity in the infectivity of malaria gametocytes to mosquitoes

Petra Schneider, Samuel S.C. Rund, Natasha L. Smith, Kimberley F. Prior, Aidan J. O'Donnell, Sarah E. Reece & Samuel S. C. Rund
Daily rhythms in behaviour, physiology, and molecular processes are expected to enable organisms to appropriately schedule activities according to consequences of the daily rotation of the Earth. For parasites, this includes capitalizing on periodicity in transmission opportunities and for hosts/vectors, this may select for rhythms in immune defence. We examine rhythms in the density and infectivity of transmission forms (gametocytes) of rodent malaria parasites in the host’s blood, parasite development inside mosquito vectors, and potential...

Data from: Tracking of host defenses and phylogeny during the radiation of Neotropical Inga-Feeding sawflies (Hymenoptera; Argidae)

María-José Endara, James A. Nicholls, Phyllis D. Coley, Dale L. Forrister, Gordon C. Younkin, Kyle G. Dexter, Catherine A. Kidner, R. Toby Pennington, Graham N. Stone, Thomas A. Kursar & R. T. Pennington
Coevolutionary theory has long predicted that the arms race between plants and herbivores is a major driver of host selection and diversification. At a local scale, plant defenses contribute significantly to the structure of herbivore assemblages and the high alpha diversity of plants in tropical rain forests. However, the general importance of plant defenses in host associations and divergence at regional scales remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of plant defensive traits and phylogeny...

Data from: Inter- and intra-specific genomic divergence in Drosophila montana shows evidence for cold adaptation

Darren J. Parker, R. Axel W. Wiberg, Urmi Trivedi, Venera I. Tyukmaeva, Karim Gharbi, Roger K. Butlin, Anneli Hoikkala, Maaria Kankare, Michael G. Ritchie, Roger K Butlin, Darren J Parker, Venera I Tyukmaeva, R Axel W Wiberg & Michael G Ritchie
D. montana gff fileGenome annotation file for D. montana genome (Accession number: LUVX00000000)D.mont_freeze_v1.4.gff.txt

Data from: The evolution of colour polymorphism in British winter‐active Lepidoptera in response to search image use by avian predators

Jamie Conor Weir & Jamie C. Weir
Phenotypic polymorphism in cryptic species is widespread. This may evolve in response to search image use by predators exerting negative frequency‐dependent selection on intraspecific colour morphs, “apostatic selection”. Evidence exists to indicate search image formation by predators and apostatic selection operating on wild prey populations, though not to demonstrate search image use directly resulting in apostatic selection. The present study attempted to address this deficiency, using British Lepidoptera active in winter as a model system....

Data from: New insights on water buffalo genomic diversity and post-domestication migration routes from medium density SNP chip data

Licia Colli, Marco Milanesi, Elia Vajana, Daniela Iamartino, Lorenzo Bomba, Francesco Puglisi, Marcello Del Corvo, Ezequiel Luis Nicolazzi, Sahar Saad El-Din Ahmed, Jesus Rommel V. Herrera, Libertado Cruz, Shuju Zhang, Aixin Liang, Gouhua Hua, Ligou Yang, Xingjie Hao, Fuyuan Zuo, Song-Jia Lai, Shuilian Wang, Ruyu Liu, Yundeng Gong, Mahdi Mokhber, Yongjiang Mao, Feng Guan, Augustin Vlaic … & Sahar S. E. Ahmed
The domestic water buffalo is native to the Asian continent but through historical migrations and recent importations, nowadays has a worldwide distribution. The two types of water buffalo, i.e., river and swamp, display distinct morphological and behavioral traits, different karyotypes and also have different purposes and geographical distributions. River buffaloes from Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, Egypt, Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, Mozambique, Brazil and Colombia, and swamp buffaloes from China, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and Brazil were genotyped with...

Data from: Timing of host feeding drives rhythms in parasite replication

Kimberley F. Prior, Daan R. Van Der Veen, Aidan J. O'Donnell, Katherine Cumnock, David Schneider, Arnab Pain, Amit Subudhi, Abhinay Ramaprasad, Samuel S. C. Rund, Nicholas J. Savill, Sarah E. Reece & Aidan J. O’Donnell
Circadian rhythms enable organisms to synchronise the processes underpinning survival and reproduction to anticipate daily changes in the external environment. Recent work shows that daily (circadian) rhythms also enable parasites to maximise fitness in the context of ecological interactions with their hosts. Because parasite rhythms matter for their fitness, understanding how they are regulated could lead to innovative ways to reduce the severity and spread of diseases. Here, we examine how host circadian rhythms influence...

Data from: Using molecular phylogenies in island biogeography: it’s about time

Luis Valente, Albert B. Phillimore & Rampal S. Etienne
Island biogeography aims at inferring the processes that govern the assembly of communities in space and time. Molecular phylogenies can tell us about the timings of island colonisations and diversification, but have rarely been used for the estimation of colonisation, speciation and extinction rates on islands. In this study we illustrate the effects of including phylogenetic information with the Galápagos avifauna. We find that by including colonisation times we obtain much more precise and accurate...

Data from: Genetic diversity, breed composition and admixture of Kenyan domestic pigs

Fidalis D. Mujibi, Edward Okoth, Evans K. Cheruiyot, Cynthia Onzere, Richard P. Bishop, Eric M. Fèvre, Lian Thomas, Charles Masembe, Graham Plastow & Max Rothschild
The genetic diversity of African pigs, whether domestic or wild has not been widely studied and there is very limited published information available. Available data suggests that African domestic pigs originate from different domestication centers as opposed to international commercial breeds. We evaluated two domestic pig populations in Western Kenya, in order to characterize the genetic diversity, breed composition and admixture of the pigs in an area known to be endemic for African swine fever...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A.F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Laurent A. F. Frantz
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: CHIIMP: an automated high-throughput microsatellite genotyping approach reveals greater allelic diversity in wild chimpanzees

Hannah J. Barbian, Andrew J. Connell, Alexa N. Avitto, Ronnie M. Russell, Andrew G. Smith, Madhurima S. Gundlapally, Alexander L. Shazad, Yingying Li, Frederic Bibollet-Ruche, Emily E. Wroblewski, Deus Mjungu, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Fiona A. Stewart, Alexander K. Piel, Anne E. Pusey, Paul M. Sharp, Beatrice H. Hahn & Andrew Jesse Connell
Short tandem repeats (STRs), also known as microsatellites, are commonly used to non-invasively genotype wild-living endangered species, including African apes. Until recently, capillary electrophoresis has been the method of choice to determine the length of polymorphic STR loci. However, this technique is labor intensive, difficult to compare across platforms, and notoriously imprecise. Here we developed a MiSeq-based approach and tested its performance using previously genotyped fecal samples from long-term studied chimpanzees in Gombe National Park,...

Data from: Newly recognized Famennian lungfishes from East Greenland reveal tooth plate diversity and blur the Devonian–Carboniferous boundary

Jennifer Alice Clack, Thomas James Challands, Timothy Richard Smithson & Keturah Zoe Smithson
Three specimens of lungfishes from the late Famennian of East Greenland are described. One forms the holotype of a new genus and species, Celsiodon ahlberg gen. et sp. nov., which, in cladistic analyses, is placed close to the Carboniferous genus Ctenodus. The analyses reveal some Late Devonian lungfishes clustering with Early Carboniferous taxa, suggesting that Late Devonian lungfishes included more crownward taxa than previously appreciated, and that the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary was more fluid for lungfish...

Data from: Antibodies and coinfection drive variation in nematode burdens in wild mice

Melanie Clerc, Godefroy Devevey, Andy Fenton & Amy B. Pedersen
Coinfections with parasitic helminths and microparasites are highly common in nature and can lead to complex within-host interactions between parasite species which can cause negative health outcomes for humans, and domestic and wild animals. Many of these negative health effects worsen with increasing parasite burdens. However, even though many studies have identified several key factors that determine worm burdens across various host systems, less is known about how the immune response interacts with these factors...

Data from: Guidelines and considerations for designing field experiments simulating precipitation extremes in forest ecosystems

Heidi Asbjornsen, John L. Campbell, Katie A. Jennings, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Cameron McIntire, Pamela H. Templer, Richard P. Phillips, Taryn L. Bauerle, Michael C. Dietze, Serita D. Frey, Peter M. Groffman, Rosella Guerrieri, Paul J. Hanson, Eric P. Kelsey, Alan K. Knapp, Nathan G. McDowell, Patrick Meir, Kimberly A. Novick, Scott V. Ollinger, Will T. Pockman, Paul G. Schaberg, Stan D. Wullschleger, Melinda D. Smith & Lindsey E. Rustad
1. Context. Precipitation regimes are changing in response to climate change, yet understanding of how forest ecosystems respond to extreme droughts and pluvials remains incomplete. As future precipitation extremes will likely fall outside the range of historical variability, precipitation manipulation experiments (PMEs) are critical to advancing knowledge about potential ecosystem responses. However, few PMEs have been conducted in forests compared to short-statured ecosystems, and forest PMEs have unique design requirements and constraints. Moreover, past forest...

Data from: Mutational load, inbreeding depression and heterosis in subdivided populations

Brian Charlesworth
This paper examines the extent to which empirical estimates of inbreeding depression and inter-population heterosis in subdivided populations, as well as the effects of local population size on mean fitness, can be explained in terms of current estimates of mutation rates, and the distribution of selection coefficients against deleterious mutations provided by population genomics data. Using population genetics models, numerical predictions of the genetic load, inbreeding depression and heterosis were obtained for a broad range...

Data from: Biparental care is more than the sum of its parts: experimental evidence for synergistic effects on offspring fitness

Natalie Pilakouta, Hanlon J.H. Elizabeth, Per T. Smiseth & Elizabeth J. H. Hanlon
Despite an extensive body of theoretical and empirical literature on biparental cooperation, it is still unclear whether offspring fare equally, better, or worse when receiving care by two parents versus a single parent. Some models predict that parents should withhold the amount of care they provide due to sexual conflict, thereby shifting as much of the workload as possible to their partner. This conflict should lead to offspring faring worse with two parents. Yet, other...

Data from: Differential effects of offspring and maternal inbreeding on egg laying and offspring performance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

Lucy E. Ford, Kirsten J. Henderson & Per T. Smiseth
We investigate the effect of offspring and maternal inbreeding on maternal and offspring traits associated with early offspring fitness in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, we manipulated maternal inbreeding only (keeping offspring outbred) by generating mothers that were outbred, moderately inbred or highly inbred. Meanwhile, in the second experiment, we manipulated offspring inbreeding only (keeping females outbred) by generating offspring that were outbred, moderately inbred or highly...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    47

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    47

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    47
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • Australian National University
    3
  • University of St Andrews
    3
  • University of Liverpool
    3
  • National Museum
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • University of Bern
    2
  • International Institute for Environment and Development
    2
  • University of Sydney
    2
  • City University of New York
    1