9 Works

Data from: Genome scans reveal candidate regions involved in the adaptation to host plant in the pea aphid complex

Julie Jaquiéry, Solenn Stoeckel, Pierre Nouhaud, Lucie Mieuzet, Frédérique Mahéo, Fabrice Legeai, Nina Bernard, Antoine Bonvoisin, Renaud Vitalis & Jean-Christophe Simon
A major goal in evolutionary biology is to uncover the genetic basis of adaptation. Divergent selection exerted on ecological traits may result in adaptive population differentiation and reproductive isolation and affect differentially the level of genetic divergence along the genome. Genome-wide scan of large sets of individuals from multiple populations is a powerful approach to identify loci or genomic regions under ecologically divergent selection. Here, we focused on the pea aphid, a species complex of...

Data from: Polymorphism pattern at a Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Element locus downstream of the domestication gene Teosinte-branched1 in wild and domesticated pearl millet

Yann Dussert, Marie-Stanislas Remigereau, Michael C. Fontaine, Alodie Snirc, Ghayas Lakis, Solenn Stoeckel, Thierry Langin, Aboubakry Sarr, Thierry Robert, M.-S. Remigereau, M. C. Fontaine, T. Langin, S. Stoeckel, Y. Dussert, A. Snirc, G. Lakis, A. Sarr & T. Robert
Unraveling the mechanisms involved in adaptation to understand plant morphological evolution is a challenging goal. For crop species, identification of molecular causal polymorphisms involved in domestication traits are central to this issue. Pearl millet, a domesticated grass mostly found in semi-arid areas of Africa and India, is an interesting model to address this topic: the domesticated form shares common derived phenotypes with some other cereals such as a decreased ability to develop basal and axillary...

Data from: Inferences on population history of a seed chalcid wasp: invasion success despite a severe founder effect from an unexpected source population

Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg, Thomas Boivin, Emmanuelle Magnoux, Claudine Courtin, Alain Roques & Carole Kerdelhué
Most invasive species established in Europe originate from either Asia or North America, but little is currently known about the potential of the Anatolian Peninsula (Asia Minor) and/or the Near East to constitute invasion sources. Mediterranean forests are generally fragile ecosystems that can be threatened by invasive organisms coming from different regions of the Mediterranean Basin, but for which historical data are difficult to gather and the phylogeographic patterns are still poorly understood for most...

Data from: Digging through model complexity: using hierarchical models to uncover evolutionary processes in the wild

Mathieu Buoro, Etienne Prévost & Olivier Gimenez
The growing interest for studying questions in the wild requires acknowledging that eco-evolutionary processes are complex, hierarchically structured and often partially observed or with measurement error. These issues have long been ignored in evolutionary biology, which might have led to flawed inference when addressing evolutionary questions. Hierarchical modelling (HM) has been proposed as a generic statistical framework to deal with complexity in ecological data and account for uncertainty. However, to date, HM has seldom been...

Data from: Outlier loci highlight the direction of introgression in oaks

Erwan Guichoux, Pauline Garnier-Gere, Lélia Lagache, Tiange Lang, Christophe Boury & Rémy J. Petit
Loci considered to be under selection are generally avoided in attempts to infer past demographic processes as they do not fit neutral model assumptions. However, opportunities to better reconstruct some aspects of past demography might thus be missed. Here we examined genetic differentiation between two sympatric European oak species with contrasting ecological dynamics (Quercus robur and Q. petraea) with both outlier (i.e. loci possibly affected by divergent selection between species or by hitchhiking effects with...

Data from: Cytonuclear discordance among the Southeast Asian Black rats (Rattus rattus complex)

Marie Pagès, Eric Bazin, Maxime Galan, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Vincent Herbreteau, Johan Michaux, Sylvain Piry, Serge Morand & Jean-François Cosson
Black rats are major invasive vertebrate pests with severe ecological, economic and health impacts. Remarkably, their evolutionary history has received little attention, and there is no firm agreement on how many species should be recognized within the black rat complex. This species complex is native to India and Southeast Asia. According to current taxonomic classification, there are three taxa living in sympatry in several parts of Thailand, Cambodia and Lao People's Democratic Republic, where this...

Data from: Fine-scale environmental control of hybridization in oaks

Lélia Lagache, Etienne K. Klein, Erwan Guichoux & Rémy J. Petit
Natural hybridization is attracting much interest in modern speciation and conservation biology studies, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear why environmental changes often increase hybridization rates. To study this question, we surveyed mating events in a mixed oak stand and developed a spatially-explicit individual-based hybridization model. This model, where hybridization is frequency dependent, pollen is non-limiting and which allows immigrant pollen to compete with local pollen, takes into account...

Data from: Invasion genetics of the introduced black rat (Rattus rattus) in Senegal, West Africa

Adam Konečný, Arnaud Estoup, Jean-Marc Duplantier, Josef Bryja, Khalilou Ba, Maxime Galan, Caroline Tatard & Jean-François Cosson
An understanding of the evolutionary history and dynamics of invasive species is required for the construction of predictive models of future spread, and the design of biological management measures. The black rat (Rattus rattus) is a major vertebrate invader with a worldwide distribution. Despite the severe ecological, economic and health impacts of this species, its evolutionary history has been little studied. We carried out extensive specimen sampling in Senegal, West Africa, and used microsatellite markers...

Data from: Virus adaptation to quantitative plant resistance: erosion or breakdown?

J. Montarry, E. Cartier, M. Jacquemond, A. Palloix & B. Moury
Adaptation of populations to new environments is frequently costly due to trade-offs between life history traits, and consequently, parasites are expected to be locally adapted to sympatric hosts. Also, during adaptation to the host, an increase of parasite fitness could have direct consequences on its aggressiveness (i.e. the quantity of damages caused to the host by the virus). These two phenomena have been observed in the context of pathogen adaptation to host qualitative and monogenic...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    9
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Montpellier SupAgro
    2
  • University of Bordeaux
    2
  • Centre de Biologie et de Gestion des Populations
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • Mahidol University
    1
  • University of Paris-Sud
    1