219 Works

Data from: Signal diversification in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by energetic, morphometric, and acoustic trade-offs

Laurel B. Symes, Matthew P. Ayres, Colleen P. Cowdery, Robin A. Costello, L. B. Symes & R. A. Costello
Physiology, physics, and ecological interactions can generate trade-offs within species, but may also shape divergence among species. We tested whether signal divergence in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by acoustic, energetic, and behavioral trade-offs. We found that species with faster pulse rates, produced by opening and closing wings up to twice as many times per second, did not have higher metabolic costs of calling. The relatively constant energetic cost across species is explained by trade-offs...

Data from: Genome assembly improvement and mapping convergently evolved skeletal traits in sticklebacks with genotyping-by-sequencing

Andrew M. Glazer, Emily E. Killingbeck, Therese Mitros, Daniel S. Rokhsar & Craig T. Miller
Marine populations of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) have repeatedly colonized and rapidly adapted to freshwater habitats, providing a powerful system to map the genetic architecture of evolved traits. Here, we developed and applied a binned genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method to build dense genome-wide linkage maps of sticklebacks using two large marine by freshwater F2 crosses of more than 350 fish each. The resulting linkage maps significantly improve the genome assembly by anchoring 78 new scaffolds...

Data from: Experimental evidence that the effectiveness of conservation biological control depends on landscape complexity

Mattias Jonsson, Cory S. Straub, Raphael K. Didham, Hannah L. Buckley, Bradley S. Case, Roddy J. Hale, Claudio Gratton & Steve D. Wratten
1. The expansion of intensive agricultural practices is a major threat to biodiversity and to the delivery of ecosystem services on which humans depend. Local-scale conservation management strategies, such as agri-environment schemes to preserve biodiversity, have been widely adopted to reduce the negative impacts of agricultural intensification. However, it is likely that the effectiveness of these local-scale management actions depend on the structure and composition of the surrounding landscape. 2. We experimentally tested the utility...

Data from: QTL mapping identifies candidate alleles involved in adaptive introgression and range expansion in a wild sunflower

Kenneth D. Whitney, Karl W. Broman, Nolan C. Kane, Stephen M. Hovick, Rebecca A. Randell & Loren H. Rieseberg
The wild North American sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. debilis are participants in one of the earliest identified examples of adaptive trait introgression, and the exchange is hypothesized to have triggered a range expansion in H. annuus. However, the genetic basis of the adaptive exchange has not been examined. Here, we combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with field measurements of fitness to identify candidate H. debilis QTL alleles likely to have introgressed into H....

Data from: Bayesian species delimitation combining multiple genes and traits in a unified framework

Claudia Solís-Lemus, L. Lacey Knowles & Cécile Ané
Delimitation of species based exclusively on genetic data has been advocated despite a critical knowledge gap: how might such approaches fail because they rely on genetic data alone, and would their accuracy be improved by using multiple data-types. We provide here the requisite framework for addressing these key questions. Because both phenotypic and molecular data can be analyzed in a common Bayesian framework with our program iBPP, we can compare the accuracy of delimited taxa...

Data from: Spatial genetic structure in four understory Psychotria species and implications for tropical forest diversity

Terra J. Theim, Rebecca Y. Shirk & Thomas J. Givnish
Premise of the study: Tropical forests are the most species-rich terrestrial communities on Earth, and understory trees and shrubs comprise a large fraction of their plant species diversity, especially at high rainfalls. The mechanisms responsible for generating such high levels of diversity remain unknown. One hypothesis is that fleshy-fruited understory species should have limited seed dispersal due to the sedentary nature of their avian dispersers, resulting in restricted gene flow, population differentiation at small spatial...

Data from: Model-data assimilation of multiple phenological observations to constrain and predict leaf area index

Toni Viskari, Brady Hardiman, Ankur R. Desai & Michael C. Dietze
Our limited ability to accurately simulate leaf phenology is a leading source of uncertainty in models of ecosystem carbon cycling. We evaluate if continuously updating canopy state variables with observations is beneficial for predicting phenological events. We employed ensemble adjustment Kalman filter (EAKF) to update predictions of leaf area index (LAI) and leaf extension using tower-based photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) data for 2002–2005 at Willow Creek, Wisconsin, USA, a...

Data from: Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions

Leslie M. Turner, Bettina Harr & Leslie M Turner
Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene...

Data from: Pair bonding prevents reinforcing effects of testosterone in male California mice in an unfamiliar environment

Xin Zhao, Catherine A. Marler, C. A. Marler & X. Zhao
Testosterone (T) can be released by stimuli such as social interactions, and thereby influence future social behaviours. Because the reinforcing effects of T can induce preferences for specific environmental locations, T has the potential to alter behaviour through space use. In a monogamous species, this T pulse may contribute differently to space use in sexually naive (SN) and pair-bonded (PB) males: SN males may be more likely to explore new areas to set up a...

Data from: Land-use history alters contemporary insect herbivore community composition and decouples plant-herbivore relationships

Philip G. Hahn & John L. Orrock
1. Past land use can create altered soil conditions and plant communities that persist for decades, although the effects of these altered conditions on consumers are rarely investigated. 2. Using a large-scale field study at 36 sites in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) woodlands, we examined whether historic agricultural land use leads to differences in the abundance and community composition of insect herbivores (grasshoppers, families Acrididae and Tettigoniidae). 3. We measured the cover of six plant...

Data from: Tree-hugging koalas demonstrate a novel thermoregulatory mechanism for arboreal mammals

Natalie J. Briscoe, Kathrine A. Handasyde, Stephen R. Griffiths, Warren P. Porter, Andrew Krockenberger, Michael R. Kearney, S. R. Griffiths, A. Krockenberger, W. P. Porter, N. J. Briscoe, K. A. Handasyde & M. R. Kearney
How climate impacts organisms depends not only on their physiology, but also whether they can buffer themselves against climate variability via their behaviour. One of the way species can withstand hot temperatures is by seeking out cool microclimates, but only if their habitat provides such refugia. Here, we describe a novel thermoregulatory strategy in an arboreal mammal, the koala Phascolarctos cinereus. During hot weather, koalas enhanced conductive heat loss by seeking out and resting against...

Data from: Direct sequencing of haplotypes from diploid individuals through a modified emulsion PCR-based single-molecule sequencing approach

Brian P. H. Metzger, Gregory W. Gelembiuk, Carol E. Lee, Brian Patrick Hansen Metzger, Gregory William Gelembiuk & Carol Eunmi Lee
While standard DNA sequencing approaches readily yield genotypic sequence data, haplotype information is often of greater utility for population genetic analyses. However, obtaining individual haplotype sequences can be costly and time consuming, and sometimes requires statistical reconstruction approaches that are subject to bias and error. Advancements have recently been made in determining individual chromosomal sequences in large-scale genomic studies, yet few options exist for obtaining this information from large numbers of highly polymorphic individuals in...

Data from: Combined effects of night warming and light pollution on predator-prey interactions

Colleen R. Miller, Brandon T. Barton, Likai Zhu, Volker C. Radeloff, Kerry M. Oliver, Jason P. Harmon & Anthony R. Ives
Interactions between multiple anthropogenic environmental changes can drive non-additive effects in ecological systems, and the non-additive effects can in turn be amplified or dampened by spatial covariation among environmental changes. We investigated the combined effects of night-time warming and light pollution on pea aphids and two predatory ladybeetle species. As expected, neither night-time warming nor light pollution changed the suppression of aphids by the ladybeetle species that forages effectively in darkness. However, for the more-visual...

Data from: Evaluation of downscaled, gridded climate data for the conterminous United States

Ruben Behnke, Stephen Vavrus, Andrew Allstadt, Thomas Albright, Wayne E. Thogmartin, Volker C. Radeloff, S. Vavrus, R. Behnke, T. Albright, A. Allstadt & V. C. Radeloff
Weather and climate affect many ecological processes, making spatially continuous yet fine-resolution weather data desirable for ecological research and predictions. Numerous downscaled weather data sets exist, but little attempt has been made to evaluate them systematically. Here we address this shortcoming by focusing on four major questions: (1) How accurate are downscaled, gridded climate data sets in terms of temperature and precipitation estimates? (2) Are there significant regional differences in accuracy among data sets? (3)...

Data from: Seed transmission of soybean vein necrosis virus: the first Tospovirus implicated in seed transmission

Carol Groves, Thomas German, Ranjit Dasgupta, Daren Mueller & Damon L. Smith
Soybean vein necrosis virus (SVNV; genus Tospovirus; Family Bunyaviridae) is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus that has been detected across the United States and in Ontario, Canada. In 2013, a seed lot of a commercial soybean variety (Glycine max) with a high percentage of discolored, deformed and undersized seed was obtained. A random sample of this seed was planted in a growth room under standard conditions. Germination was greater than 90% and the resulting seedlings...

Data from: A unique ecological niche fosters hybridization of oak-tree and vineyard isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Katie J Clowers, Jessica L Will, Audrey P Gasch, Katie J. Clowers, Jessica L. Will & Audrey P. Gasch
Differential adaptation to distinct niches can restrict gene flow and promote population differentiation within a species. However, in some cases the distinction between niches can collapse, forming a hybrid niche with features of both environments. We previously reported that distinctions between vineyards and oak soil present an ecological barrier that restricts gene flow between lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Vineyard isolates are tolerant to stresses associated with grapes while North American oak strains are particularly tolerant...

Data from: Colonization and demographic expansion of freshwater fauna across the Hawaiian Archipelago

Fernando Alda, Roderick B. Gagne, Ryan P. Walter, J. Derek Hogan, Kristine N. Moody, Frida Zink, Peter B. McIntyre, James F. Gilliam, Michael J. Blum, P. B. McIntyre, K. N. Moody, J. F. Gilliam, F. Alda, R. B. Gagne, R. P. Walter, J. D. Hogan, F. Zink & M. J. Blum
It is widely accepted that insular terrestrial biodiversity progresses with island age because colonization and diversification proceed over time. Here we assess whether this principle extends to oceanic island streams. We examined range-wide mtDNA sequence variation in four stream-dwelling species across the Hawaiian archipelago to characterize the relationship between colonization and demographic expansion, and to determine whether either factor reflects island age. We found that colonization and demographic expansion are not related and that neither...

Data from: Deterministic and stochastic processes lead to divergence in plant communities 25 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

William H. Romme, Timothy G. Whitby, Daniel B. Tinker & Monica G. Turner
Young, recently burned forests are increasingly widespread throughout western North America, but forest development after large wildfires is not fully understood, especially regarding effects of variable burn severity, environmental heterogeneity, and changes in drivers over time. We followed development of subalpine forests after the 1988 Yellowstone fires by periodically re-sampling permanent plots established soon after the fires. We asked two questions about patterns and processes over the past 25 years: (1) Are plant species richness...

Data from: Ecosystem interactions underlie the spread of avian influenza A viruses with pandemic potential

Justin Bahl, Truc T. Pham, Nichola J. Hill, Islam T. M. Hussein, Eric J. Ma, Bernard C. Easterday, Rebecca A. Halpin, Timothy B. Stockwell, David E. Wentworth, Ghazi Kayali, Scott Krauss, Stacey Schultz-Cherry, Robert G. Webster, Richard J. Webby, Michael D. Swartz, Gavin J. D. Smith & Jonathan A. Runstadler
Despite evidence for avian influenza A virus (AIV) transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems, the roles of bird migration and poultry trade in the spread of viruses remain enigmatic. In this study we integrate ecosystem interactions into a phylogeographic model to assess the contribution of wild and domestic hosts to AIV distribution and persistence. Analysis of globally sampled AIV datasets shows frequent two-way transmission between wild and domestic ecosystems. In general, viral flow from domestic...

Data from: Altitudinal migration and the future of an iconic Hawaiian honeycreeper in response to climate change and management

Alban Guillaumet, Wendy A. Kuntz, Michael D. Samuel & Eben H. Paxton
Altitudinal movement by tropical birds to track seasonally variable resources can move them from protected areas to areas of increased vulnerability. In Hawaiʻi, historical reports suggest that many Hawaiian honeycreepers such as the ‘I'iwi (Drepanis coccinea) once undertook seasonal migrations, but the existence of such movements today is unclear. Because Hawaiian honeycreepers are highly susceptible to avian malaria, currently minimal in high-elevation forests, understanding the degree to which honeycreepers visit lower elevation forests may be...

Data from: The Mouse Universal Genotyping Array: from substrains to subspecies

Andrew P. Morgan, Chen-Ping Fu, Chia-Yu Kao, Catherine E. Welsh, John P. Didion, Liran Yadgary, Leeanna Hyacinth, Martin T. Ferris, Timothy A. Bell, Darla R. Miller, Paola Giusti-Rodriguez, Randal J. Nonneman, Kevin D. Cook, Jason K. Whitmire, Lisa E. Gralinski, Mark Keller, Alan D. Attie, Gary A. Churchill, Petko Petkov, Patrick F. Sullivan, Jennifer R. Brennan, Leonard McMillan & Fernando Pardo-Manuel De Villena
Genotyping microarrays are an important resource for genetic mapping, population genetics, and monitoring of the genetic integrity of laboratory stocks. We have developed the third generation of the Mouse Universal Genotyping Array (MUGA) series, GigaMUGA, a 143,259-probe Illumina Infinium II array for the house mouse (Mus musculus). The bulk of the content of GigaMUGA is optimized for genetic mapping in the Collaborative Cross and Diversity Outbred populations, and for substrain-level identification of laboratory mice. In...

Data from: Does habitat fragmentation promote climate-resilient phenotypes?

Christopher E. Latimer, Sheldon J. Cooper, William H. Karasov & Benjamin Zuckerberg
Understanding how individual differences in physiological performance modify behavioral responses to environmental variability and its fitness consequences is key to predicting the vulnerability of species and populations to environmental change. For many species, summit metabolic rate (M); the upper limit to heat production) and basal metabolic rate (BMR; the lower limit related to energy acquisition and processing) often constrain aspects of physiological performance and behavioral activity. We examined the relationship between metabolic phenotypes, foraging behavior,...

Data from: Development and validation of a weather-based warning system to advise fungicide applications to control dollar spot on turfgrass

Damon L. Smith, James P. Kerns, Nathan R. Walker, Andrea F. Payne, Brandon Horvath, John C. Inguagiato, John E. Kaminski, Maria Tomaso-Peterson, Paul L. Koch, D. L. Smith, P. L. Koch, J. P. Kerns, N. R. Walker, A. F. Payne, B. Horvath, J. C. Inguagiato, J. E. Kaminski & M. Tomaso-Peterson
Dollar spot is one of the most common diseases of golf course turfgrass and numerous fungicide applications are often required to provide adequate control. Weather-based disease warning systems have been developed to more accurately time fungicide applications; however, they tend to be ineffective and are not currently in widespread use. The primary objective of this research was to develop a new weather-based disease warning system to more accurately advise fungicide applications to control dollar spot...

Data from: Genome-wide association and genomic prediction models of tocochromanols in fresh sweet corn kernels

Matheus Baseggio, Matthew Murray, Maria Magallanes-Lundback, Nicholas Kaczmar, James Chamness, Edward Buckler, Margaret Smith, Dean DellaPenna, William Tracy, Michael Gore, Margaret E. Smith, Michael A. Gore, William F. Tracy & Edward S. Buckler
Sweet corn (Zea mays L.), a highly consumed fresh vegetable in the United States, varies for tocochromanol (tocopherol and tocotrienol) levels, but makes limited contribution to daily intake of vitamin E and antioxidants. We performed a genome-wide association study of six tocochromanol compounds and 14 derivative traits across a sweet corn inbred line association panel to identify genes associated with natural variation for tocochromanols and vitamin E in fresh kernels. Concordant with prior studies in...

Data from: Eprinomectin from a sustained release formulation adversely affected dung breeding insects

Christine C. Nieman, Kevin D. Floate, Rolf-Alexander During, Andre P. Heinrich, Daniel K. Young & Daniel M. Schaefer
The insecticidal activity of parasiticide residues in dung of cattle treated with a sustained release eprinomectin formulation was examined, and an improved eprinomectin dung residue extraction method is presented. Emergent insect abundance and richness were significantly reduced in all post-treatment intervals (7, 14, 28, 56, 84, 112, and 140 d), relative to pre-treatment. Emergent insect diversity was reduced for between 84 and 112 d post-treatment. Collembola were not affected by residues. Chemical analyses subsequently documented...

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