9 Works

Data from: The heritability of mating behaviour in a fly and its plasticity in response to the threat of sperm competition

Amanda J. Bretman, Anne Lizé, Craig A. Walling, Tom A. R. Price & Amanda Bretman
Phenotypic plasticity is a key mechanism by which animals can cope with rapidly changeable environments, but the evolutionary lability of such plasticity remains unclear. The socio-sexual environment can fluctuate very rapidly, affecting both the frequency of mating opportunities and the level of competition males may face. Males of many species show plastic behavioural responses to changes in social environment, in particular the presence of rival males. For example, Drosophila pseudoobscura males respond to rivals by...

Data from: Comparative finite-element analysis: a single computational modeling method can reliably estimate the mechanical properties of porcine and human vertebrae

Kate A. Robson Brown, Sami Tarsuslugil, V. Nagitha Wijayathunga & Ruth K. Wilcox
Significant advances in the functional analysis of musculoskeletal systems require the development of modelling techniques with improved focus, accuracy and validity. This need is particularly visible in the fields, such as palaeontology, where unobservable parameters may lie at the heart of the most interesting research questions, and where models and simulations may provide some of the most innovative solutions. Here, we report on the development of a computational modelling method to generate estimates of the...

Data from: Macroevolutionary consequences of profound climate change on niche evolution in marine mollusks over the past three million years

Erin E. Saupe, Jonathan R. Hendricks, Roger W. Portell, Harry J. Dowsett, Alan Haywood, Stephen J. Hunter, Bruce S. Lieberman, B. S. Lieberman, E. E. Saupe, A. Haywood, S. J. Hunter, H. J. Dowsett & R. W. Portell
In order to predict the fate of biodiversity in a rapidly changing world, we must first understand how species adapt to new environmental conditions. The long-term evolutionary dynamics of species' physiological tolerances to differing climatic regimes remain obscure. Here, we unite palaeontological and neontological data to analyse whether species' environmental tolerances remain stable across 3 Myr of profound climatic changes using 10 phylogenetically, ecologically and developmentally diverse mollusc species from the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal...

Data from: Do the same genes underlie parallel phenotypic divergence in different Littorina saxatilis populations?

Anja M. Westram, Juan Galindo, Magnus Alm Rosenblad, John W. Grahame, Marina Panova, Roger K. Butlin, J. W. Grahame, A. M. Westram, R. K. Butlin, M. Alm Rosenblad, M. Panova & J. Galindo
Parallel patterns of adaptive divergence and speciation are cited as powerful evidence for the role of selection driving these processes. However, it is often not clear whether parallel phenotypic divergence is underlain by parallel genetic changes. Here, we asked about the genetic basis of parallel divergence in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis, which has repeatedly evolved coexisting ecotypes adapted to either crab predation or wave action. We sequenced the transcriptome of snails of both ecotypes...

Data from: The ontogeny of visual motor memory and its importance in handwriting and reading: a developing construct

Amanda H. Waterman, Jelena Havelka, Peter R. Culmer, Liam J. B. Hill, Mark Mon-Williams, P. R. Culmer, J. Havelka, L. J. B. Hill, M. Mon-Williams & A. H. Waterman
Humans have evolved a remarkable ability to remember visual shapes and use these representations to generate motor activity (from Palaeolithic cave drawings through Jiahu symbols to cursive handwriting). The term visual–motor memory (VMM) describes this psychological ability, which must have conveyed an evolutionary advantage and remains critically important to humans (e.g. when learning to write). Surprisingly, little empirical investigation of this unique human ability exists—almost certainly because of the technological difficulties involved in measuring VMM....

High-resolution hydraulic parameter maps for surface soils in tropical South America

T. Marthews, C.A. Quesada, D.R. Galbraith, Y. Malhi, C.E. Mullins, M.G. Hodnett & I. Dharssi
Spatial data files holding gridded parameter maps of surface soil hydraulic parameters derived from a selection of pedotransfer functions. Modern land surface model simulations capture soil profile water movement through the use of soil hydraulics sub-models, but good hydraulic parameterisations are often lacking - especially in the tropics - and it is this lack that we fill here in the context of South America. Optimal hydraulic parameter values are given for the Brooks and Corey,...

Data from: Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

Rachel A. Paterson, Jaimie T. A. Dick, Daniel W. Pritchard, Marilyn Ennis, Melanie J. Hatcher & Alison M. Dunn
1. Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator-prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. 2. Other inter-specific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator-prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. 3. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to...

Data from: De novo assembly and comparative analysis of the Ceratodon purpureus transcriptome

Péter Szövényi, Pierre-François Perroud, Aikaterini Symeonidi, Sean Stevenson, Ralph S. Quatrano, Stefan A. Rensing, Andrew C. Cuming & Stuart F. McDaniel
The bryophytes are a morphologically and ecologically diverse group of plants that have recently emerged as major model systems for a variety of biological processes. In particular, the genome sequence of the moss, Physcomitrella patens, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the evolution of developmental processes in land plants. However, to fully explore the diversity within bryophytes, we need additional genomic resources. Here we describe analyses of the transcriptomes of a male and a female...

Data from: Phylogenetic tree shape and the structure of mutualistic networks

Scott Chamberlain, Diego P. Vázquez, Luisa Carvalheiro, Elizabeth Elle & Jana C. Vamosi
Species community composition is known to alter the network of interactions between two trophic levels, potentially affecting its functioning (e.g. plant pollination success) and the stability of communities. Phylogenies vary in shape with regard to the rate of evolutionary change across a tree (influencing tree balance) and variation in the timing of branching events (affecting the distribution of node ages in trees), both of which may influence the structure of species interaction networks. Because related...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Leeds
    9
  • University of Florida
    2
  • University of Bristol
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • Queen's University Belfast
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • Philipp University of Marburg
    1
  • University of Gothenburg
    1
  • Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia
    1