101 Works

Individual variation in migratory behavior in a sub-arctic partial migrant shorebird

Verónica Méndez Aragón, Jose Alves, Bodvar Þórisson, Alina Marca, Tomas Gunnarsson & Jennifer Gill
Migratory behavior can differ markedly amongst individuals within populations or species. Understanding the factors influencing this variation is key to understanding how current environmental changes might influence migratory propensity and the distribution and abundance of migratory species across their range. Here, we investigate variation in migratory behavior of the partially migratory Eurasian oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus) population breeding in Iceland. We use resightings of color-ringed adults and stable isotopes to determine whether individuals migrate or remain...

Feather isotope ratios and sexing of oystercatchers breeding in Iceland, 2013-2017

J.A. Gill, V. Mendez, T.G. Gunnarsson, J.A. Alves & B. Thorrison
Dataset comprises of the delta-13C and delta-15N stable isotopic information from feather samples (for 552 individuals) and the sex (assigned by DNA-analysis of blood samples for 321 individuals) of oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus) breeding in Iceland during the summers of 2013-2017. The Icelandic oystercatcher population contains individuals that stay in Iceland year-round and individuals that migrate to mainland Europe in the non-breeding season, and feather isotope ratios provide a means of distinguishing between these migratory behaviours...

Seasonal streambed carbon and nitrogen cycling (including greenhouse gases) in an agriculturally-impacted stream. Measured at Wood Brook UK, 2016-2017

S. Comer-Warner, S. Krause, D.C. Gooddy, S. Ullah & S.K. Wexler
The dataset contains chemistry data from streambed porewater (10 and 20 cm) and surface water, as well as nitrogen chemistry data at 2.5 cm resolution within the upper 15 cm of the streambed. The dataset includes concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and nitrous oxide, and isotopic ratios of δ13CCO2, δ15NNO3+NO2 and δ18ONO3+NO2. Also included are measurements of dissolved oxygen and temperature. Samples were collected from three reaches within...

Survival and reproductive success of migrant and resident wildlife in published studies of partially migratory populations

C. Buchan, J.J. Gilroy, I. Catry & A.M.A. Franco
This is a dataset generated from information extracted from previously published studies, for the purpose of a meta-analysis investigating fitness benefits of different migratory strategies in partially migratory populations. Each line of data includes a mean and associated variance for a given fitness metric for both migrants and residents extracted from a study, in addition to information concerning population location, study species, type of fitness metric, year data were collected, and details on the publication...

Location data of worker bumblebees across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, UK

C. Carvell, A.F.G. Bourke, S. Dreier, M.S. Heard, W.C. Jordan, S. Sumner, J. Wang & J.W. Redhead
This dataset contains locations of worker bumblebees of five species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum, B. ruderatus) across an agricultural landscape centred on the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Locations were recorded in the field using a handheld GPS unit. Workers were non-lethally DNA sampled between June and August 2011, and genetic analysis used to confirm species and assign individuals to full-sib groups (colonies). Data were collected as part of a project led...

Family lineage and landscape quality data for wild bumblebee colonies across an agricultural landscape in Buckinghamshire, U.K.

C. Carvell, A.F.G. Bourke, S. Dreier, S.N. Freeman, S. Hulmes, W.C. Jordan, J.W. Redhead, J. Wang, S. Sumner & M.S. Heard
Family lineage relationships between spring queens, daughter workers and sister queens of three bumblebee species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius and B. pascuorum) collected across the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK, between spring 2011 and spring 2012. A combination of land-use and habitat surveys, molecular genetics and spatial modelling was used to estimate the locations of wild colonies represented by greater than 1 worker and to calculate the proportions of cover represented by different habitat quality and...

Intrinsic post-ejaculation sperm ageing does not affect offspring fitness in Atlantic salmon

Simone Immler, Cosima Hotzy, Bao Xuhui & Tuuli Larva
Postmeiotic sperm ageing, both before and after ejaculation, has been shown to negatively affect offspring fitness by lowering the rate of embryonic development, reducing embryonic viability, and decreasing offspring condition. These negative effects are thought to be caused by intrinsic factors such as oxidative stress and ATP depletion or extrinsic factors such as temperature and osmosis. Effects of post-ejaculation sperm ageing on offspring fitness have so far almost exclusively been tested in internal fertilisers. Here,...

Data from: A critical analysis of the potential for EU Common Agricultural Policy measures to support wild pollinators on farmland

Lorna Cole, David Kleijn, Lynn Dicks, Jane Stout, Simon Potts, Matthias Albrecht, Mario Balzan, Ignasi Bartomeus, Penelope Bebeli, Danilo Bevk, Jacobus Biesmeijer, Róbert Chlebo, Anželika Dautartė, Nikolaos Emmanouil, Chris Hartfield, John Holland, Andrea Holzschuh, Nieke Knoben, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Yael Mandelik, Heleni Panou, Robert Paxton, Theodora Petanidou, Miguel Pinheiro De Carvalho, Rundlöf, Maj … & Jeroen Scheper
1. Agricultural intensification and associated loss of high-quality habitats are key drivers of insect pollinator declines. With the aim of decreasing the environmental impact of agriculture, the 2014 EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) defined a set of habitat and landscape features (Ecological Focus Areas: EFAs) farmers could select from as a requirement to receive basic farm payments. To inform the post-2020 CAP, we performed a European-scale evaluation to determine how different EFA options vary in...

Pollution control can help mitigate future climate change impacts on European grayling in the UK

J. Vanessa Huml, W. Edwin Harris, Martin I. Taylor, Robin Sen, Christel Prudhomme & Jonathan S. Ellis
Aim We compare the performance of habitat suitability models using climate data only or climate data together with water chemistry, land cover and predation pressure data to model the distribution of European grayling (Thymallus thymallus). From these models, we (1) investigate the relationship between habitat suitability and genetic diversity; (2) project the distribution of grayling under future climate change and (3) model the effects of habitat mitigation on future distributions. Location United Kingdom Methods Maxent...

Data from: Rubber agroforestry in Thailand provides some biodiversity benefits without reducing yields

Eleanor Warren-Thomas, Luke Nelson, Watinee Juthong, Sara Bumrungsri, Oskar Brattström, Laetitia Stroesser, Bénédicte Chambon, Éric Penot, Uraiwan Tongkaemkew, David P. Edwards & Paul M. Dolman
Monocultural rubber plantations have replaced tropical forest, causing biodiversity loss. While protecting intact or semi-intact biodiverse forest is paramount, improving biodiversity value within the 11.4 million hectares of existing rubber plantations could offer important conservation benefits, if yields are also maintained. Some farmers practice agroforestry with high-yielding clonal rubber varieties to increase and diversify incomes. Here, we ask whether such rubber agroforestry improves biodiversity value or affects rubber yields relative to monoculture. We surveyed birds,...

Data from: Telomere length reveals cumulative individual and transgenerational inbreeding effects in a passerine bird

Kat Bebbington, Lewis G. Spurgin, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Hannah L. Dugdale, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke & David S. Richardson
Inbreeding results in more homozygous offspring that should suffer reduced fitness, but it can be difficult to quantify these costs for several reasons. First, inbreeding depression may vary with ecological or physiological stress and only be detectable over long time periods. Second, parental homozygosity may indirectly affect offspring fitness, thus confounding analyses that consider offspring homozygosity alone. Finally, measurement of inbreeding coefficients, survival and reproductive success may often be too crude to detect inbreeding costs...

Data from: Reliable, verifiable and efficient monitoring of biodiversity via metabarcoding

Yinqiu Ji, Louise Ashton, Scott M. Pedley, David P. Edwards, Yong Tang, Akihiro Nakamura, Roger Kitching, Paul M. Dolman, Paul Woodcock, Felicity A. Edwards, Trond H. Larsen, Wayne W. Hsu, Suzan Benedick, Keith C. Hamer, David S. Wilcove, Catharine Bruce, Xiaoyang Wang, Taal Levi, Martin Lott, Brent C. Emerson & Douglas W. Yu
To manage and conserve biodiversity, one must know what is being lost, where, and why, as well as which remedies are likely to be most effective. Metabarcoding technology can characterise the species compositions of mass samples of eukaryotes or of environmental DNA. Here, we validate metabarcoding by testing it against three high-quality standard data sets that were collected in Malaysia (tropical), China (subtropical) and the United Kingdom (temperate) and that comprised 55,813 arthropod and bird...

Data from: The effects of recombination, mutation and selection on the evolution of the Rp1 resistance genes in grasses

Agathe Jouet, Mark McMullan & Cock Van Oosterhout
Plant immune genes, or resistance genes, are involved in a co-evolutionary arms race with a diverse range of pathogens. In agronomically important grasses, such R genes have been extensively studied because of their role in pathogen resistance and in the breeding of resistant cultivars. In this study, we evaluate the importance of recombination, mutation and selection on the evolution of the R gene complex Rp1 of Sorghum, Triticum, Brachypodium, Oryza and Zea. Analyses show that...

Data from: PyroClean: Denoising pyrosequences from protein-coding amplicons for the recovery of interspecific and intraspecific genetic variation

Ricardo Ramirez-Gonzalez, Douglas W. Yu, Catharine Bruce, Darren Heavens, Mario Caccamo & Brent C. Emerson
DatasetsThis .zip files contains two folders. The folder "Control" contains the 15 raw 454 sequence files generated from the "Test Pools" analysis detailed in Table 2 of the manuscript, and a file of 27 Sanger sequences listed in Table S1. The folder "Tenerife" contains the 6 raw 454 sequence files associated generated from the "Tenerife Forest Samples" analysis detailed in Table 3 of the manuscript.

Data from: A genomic island linked to ecotype divergence in Atlantic cod

Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Einar E. Nielsen, Nina O. Therkildsen, Martin I. Taylor, Rob Ogden, Audrey J. Geffen, Dorte Bekkevold, Sarah Helyar, Christophe Pampoulie, Torild Johansen & Gary R. Carvalho
The genomic architecture underlying ecological divergence and ecological speciation with gene flow is still largely unknown for most organisms. One central question is whether divergence is genome-wide or localized in “genomic mosaics” during early stages when gene flow is still pronounced. Empirical work has so far been limited, and the relative impacts of gene flow and natural selection on genomic patterns have not been fully explored. Here, we use ecotypes of Atlantic cod to investigate...

Data from: Assessing bottom-trawling impacts based on the longevity of benthic invertebrates

Jan Geert Hiddink, Simon Jennings, Marija Sciberras, Stefan Bolam, Giulia Cambie, Robert McConnaughey, Tessa Mazor, Ray Hilborn, Jeremy Collie, C. Roland Pitcher, Ana Parma, Petri Suuronen, Michel Kaiser, Adriaan Rijnsdorp, Jeremy S. Collie, Michel J. Kaiser, Adriaan D. Rijnsdorp & Robert A. McConnaughey
1. Bottom trawling is the most widespread human activity directly affecting seabed habitats. Assessment and effective management of the effects of bottom trawling at the scale of fisheries requires an understanding of differences in sensitivity of biota to trawling. Responses to disturbance are expected to depend on the intrinsic rate of increase of populations (r), which is expected to be linearly related to the reciprocal of longevity. 2. We examine the relationship between the longevity...

Data from: Exploring and visualising spaces of tree reconciliations

Katharina T. Huber, Vincent Moulton, Marie-France Sagot, Blerina Sinaimeri & Katharina T Huber
Tree reconciliation is the mathematical tool that is used to investigate the coevolution of organisms, such as hosts and parasites. A common approach to tree reconciliation involves specifying a model that assigns costs to certain events, such as cospeciation, and then tries to find a mapping between two specified phylogenetic trees which minimises the total cost of the implied events. For such models, it has been shown that there may be a huge number of...

Data from: Drivers of power line use by white storks: a case study of birds nesting on anthropogenic structures

Francisco Moreira, Ricardo C. Martins, Ines Catry & Marcello D'Amico
1. Anthropogenic structures are mainly known to have negative impacts on wildlife populations but sometimes arethey can be beneficial. Power lines are a main driver of bird mortality through collision or electrocution, but electricity pylons are also commonly used for nest building by some species. Birds and nests cause power outages that need to be tackled by electricity companies. However, the use of pylons by threatened species provides an opportunity for conservation purposes. 2. In...

Data from: Evidence of opposing fitness effects of parental heterozygosity and relatedness in a critically endangered marine turtle?

Karl P. Phillips, Tove H. Jorgensen, Kevin G. Jolliffe, David S. Richardson, T. H. Jorgensen, K. P. Phillips & D. S. Richardson
How individual genetic variability relates to fitness is important in understanding evolution and the processes affecting populations of conservation concern. Heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) have been widely used to study this link in wild populations, where key parameters that affect both variability and fitness, such as inbreeding, can be difficult to measure. We used estimates of parental heterozygosity and genetic similarity (‘relatedness’) derived from 32 microsatellite markers to explore the relationship between genetic variability and fitness...

Data from: Carrion fly-derived DNA metabarcoding is an effective tool for mammal surveys: evidence from a known tropical mammal community

Torrey W. Rodgers, Charles C. Y. Xu, Jacalyn Giacalone, Karen M. Kapheim, Kristin Saltonstall, Marta Vargas, Douglas W. Yu, Panu Somervuo, W. Owen McMillan & Patrick A. Jansen
Metabarcoding of vertebrate DNA derived from carrion flies has been proposed as a promising tool for biodiversity monitoring. To evaluate its efficacy, we conducted metabarcoding surveys of carrion flies on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, which has a well-known mammal community, and compared our results against diurnal transect counts and camera-trapping. We collected 1084 flies in 29 sampling days, conducted metabarcoding with mammal-specific (16S) and vertebrate-specific (12S) primers, and sequenced amplicons on Illumina MiSeq. For...

Data from: Climatic niche evolution is faster in sympatric than allopatric lineages of the butterfly genus Pyrgus

Camille Pitteloud, Nils Arrigo, Tomasz Suchan, Alicia Mastretta-Yanes, Roger Vila, Vlad Dinca, Juan Hernández-Roldán, Ernst Brockmann, Yannick Chittaro, Irena Kleckova, Luca Fumagalli, Sven Buerki, Loïc Pellissier & Nadir Alvarez
Understanding how speciation relates to ecological divergence has long fascinated biologists. It is assumed that ecological divergence is essential to sympatric speciation, as a mechanism to avoid competition and eventually lead to reproductive isolation, while divergence in allopatry is not necessarily associated with niche differentiation. The impact of the spatial context of divergence on the evolutionary rates of abiotic dimensions of the ecological niche has rarely been explored for an entire clade. Here, we compare...

Data from: The genetics of mate preferences in hybrids between two young and sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid species

Ola Svensson, Katie Woodhouse, Cock Van Oosterhout, Alan Smith, George F. Turner & Ole Seehausen
The genetic architecture of mate preferences is likely to affect significant evolutionary processes, including speciation and hybridization. Here, we investigate laboratory hybrids between a pair of sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid fish species that appear to have recently evolved from a hybrid population between similar predecessor species. The species demonstrate strong assortative mating in the laboratory, associated with divergent male breeding coloration (red dorsum versus blue). We show in a common garden experiment, using DNA-based paternity...

Data from: Low migratory connectivity is common in long-distance migrant birds

Tom Finch, Simon Butler, Aldina Franco, Will Cresswell, Simon J. Butler & Aldina M. A. Franco
1. Estimating how much long-distance migrant populations spread out and mix during the non-breeding season (migratory connectivity) is essential for understanding and predicting population dynamics in the face of global change. 2. We quantify variation in population spread and inter-population mixing in long-distance, terrestrial migrant land-bird populations (712 individuals from 98 populations of 45 species, from tagging studies in the Neotropic and Afro-Palearctic flyways). We evaluate the Mantel test as a metric of migratory connectivity,...

Data from: Quantifying uncertainty of taxonomic placement in DNA barcoding and metabarcoding

Panu Somervuo, Douglas W. Yu, Charles C.Y. Xu, YinQiu Ji, Jenni Hultman, Helena Wirta & Otso Ovaskainen
A crucial step in the use of DNA markers for biodiversity surveys is the assignment of Linnaean taxonomies (species, genus, etc.) to sequence reads. This allows the use of all the information known based on the taxonomic names. Taxonomic placement of DNA barcoding sequences is inherently probabilistic because DNA sequences contain errors, because there is natural variation among sequences within a species, and because reference data bases are incomplete and can have false annotations. However,...

Data from: Winter wren populations show adaptation to local climate

Catriona A. Morrison, Robert A. Robinson & James W. Pearce-Higgins
Most studies of evolutionary responses to climate change have focused on phenological responses to warming, and provide only weak evidence for evolutionary adaptation. This could be because phenological changes are more weakly linked to fitness than more direct mechanisms of climate change impacts, such as selective mortality during extreme weather events which have immediate fitness consequences for the individuals involved. Studies examining these other mechanisms may be more likely to show evidence for evolutionary adaptation....

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