6 Works

Data from: Ex situ diet influences the bacterial community associated with the skin of red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas)

Rachael E. Antwis, Rachel L. Haworth, Daniel J. P. Engelmoer, Victoria Ogilvy, Andrea L. Fidgett & Richard F. Preziosi
Amphibians support symbiotic bacterial communities on their skin that protect against a range of infectious pathogens, including the amphibian chytrid fungus. The conditions under which amphibians are maintained in captivity (e.g. diet, substrate, enrichment) in ex situ conservation programmes may affect the composition of the bacterial community. In addition, ex situ amphibian populations may support different bacterial communities in comparison to in situ populations of the same species. This could have implications for the suitability...

Data from: Parasitoid wasps influence where aphids die via an inter-specific indirect genetic effect

Mouhammad Shadi Khudr, Johan A. Oldekop, David M. Shuker, Richard F. Preziosi, D. M. Shuker, M. S. Khudr, J. A. Oldekop & R. F. Preziosi
Host–parasite interactions are a key paradigm for understanding the process of coevolution. Central to coevolution is how genetic variation in interacting species allows parasites to evolve manipulative strategies. However, genetic variation in the parasite may also be associated with host phenotype changes, thereby changing the selection on both species. For instance, parasites often induce changes in the behaviour of their host to maximize their own fitness, yet the quantitative genetic basis for behavioural manipulation has...

Data from: Evolutionary covariation in geometric morphometric data: analyzing integration, modularity, and allometry in a phylogenetic context

Christian Peter Klingenberg & Jesús Marugán-Lobón
Quantifying integration and modularity of evolutionary changes in morphometric traits is crucial for understanding how organismal shapes evolve. For this purpose, comparative studies are necessary, which need to take into account the phylogenetic structure of interspecific data. This study applies several of the standard tools of geometric morphometrics, which mostly have been used in intraspecific studies, in the new context of analyzing integration and modularity based on comparative data. Morphometric methods such as principal component...

Data from: Evolution of mir-92a underlies natural morphological variation in Drosophila melanogaster

Saad Arif, Sophie Murat, Isabel Almudi, Maria D. S. Nunes, Diane Bortolamiol-Becet, Naomi S. McGregor, James M. S. Currie, Harri Hughes, Matthew Ronshaugen, Élio Sucena, Eric C. Lai, Christian Schlötterer & Alistair P. McGregor
eworoRL514BC_QTLPhenotype and genotype data for QTL mapping between strains e, wo, ro and RAL514.eworoRL514BC.xlsstsse_ORER_QTL_mapMap information for QTL mapping between strains st, ss, e and oregon R.ssste_ORER_QTL_crossCross information for QTL mapping between strains st, ss, e and oregon R.

Data from: Can long-range PCR be used to amplify genetically divergent mitochondrial genomes for comparative phylogenetics? A case study within spiders (Arthropoda: Araneae).

Andrew G. Briscoe, Sarah Goodacre, Susan E. Masta, Martin I. Taylor, Miquel A. Arnedo, David Penney, John Kenny, Simon Creer & Sara Goodacre
The development of second generation sequencing technology has resulted in the rapid production of large volumes of sequence data for relatively little cost, thereby substantially increasing the quantity of data available for phylogenetic studies. Despite these technological advances, assembling longer sequences, such as that of entire mitochondrial genomes, has not been straightforward. Existing studies have been limited to using only incomplete or nominally intra-specific datasets resulting in a bottleneck between mitogenome amplification and downstream high-throughput...

Data from: Sexual imprinting: What strategies should we expect to see in nature?

Hayes Griffin, Robert Tucker Gilman, Dalton W. Chaffee & R. Tucker Gilman
Sexual imprinting occurs when juveniles learn mate preferences by observing the phenotypes of other members of their populations, and it is ubiquitous in nature. Imprinting strategies, that is which individuals and phenotypes are observed and how strong preferences become, vary among species. Imprinting can affect trait evolution and the probability of speciation, and different imprinting strategies are expected to have different effects. However, little is known about how and why different imprinting strategies evolve, or...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Manchester
    6
  • Bangor University
    1
  • VU Amsterdam
    1
  • Portland State University
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • University of Nottingham
    1
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    1
  • University of Barcelona
    1
  • University of St Andrews
    1
  • Oxford Brookes University
    1
  • University of Liverpool
    1