787 Works

The two oxpecker species reveal the role of movement rates and foraging intensity in species coexistence

Guillaume PERON, Christophe Bonenfant, Roxanne Gagnon & Cheryl Mabika
The two Buphagus oxpecker species are specialized passerines that forage for ticks and other food particles on the body of ungulates in the African savannas. One of their intriguing features is their ability to coexist despite sharing the same, specialized diet. Using co-occurrence data (photographs of giraffes with oxpeckers on them) and Approximate Bayesian Computing, we demonstrate that yellow-billed oxpeckers changed host faster than red-billed oxpeckers and appeared to displace red-billed oxpeckers from preferred giraffe...

Data from: Male vocalizations convey information on kinship and inbreeding in a Lekking bird

Clément Cornec, Alexandre Robert, Fanny Rybak & Yves Hingrat
Kinship and inbreeding are two major components involved in sexual selection and mating system evolution. However, the mechanisms underlying recognition and discrimination of genetically related or inbred individuals remain unclear. We investigated whether kinship and inbreeding information is related to low frequency vocalizations, “booms”, produced by males during their courtship in the lekking houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata undulata). Based on a captive breeding programme where the pedigree of all males is known, we investigated the...

Data from: Postglacial colonization routes coincide with a life history breakpoint along a latitudinal gradient

Emilien Luquet, Patrik Rödin-Mörch, Maria Cortazar-Chinarro, Yvonne Meyer-Lucht, Jacob Höglund & Anssi Laurila
While adaptive divergence along environmental gradients has repeatedly been demonstrated, the role of postglacial colonization routes in determining phenotypic variation along gradients has received little attention. Here we used a hierarchical QST-FST approach to separate the roles of adaptive and neutral processes in shaping phenotypic variation in moor frog (Rana arvalis) larval life-histories along a 1700 km latitudinal gradient across northern Europe. This species has colonized Scandinavia via two routes with a contact zone in...

Data from: Water availability and temperature induce changes in oxidative status during pregnancy in a viviparous lizard

Andréaz Dupoué, Pauline Blaimont, David Rozen-Rechels, Murielle Richard, Sandrine Meylan, Jean Clobert, Donald Miles, Rémi Martin, Beatriz Decencière, Simon Agostini & Jean-François Le Galliard
Reproduction involves considerable reorganization in an organism’s physiology that incurs potential toxicity for cells (e.g., oxidative stress) and decrease in fitness. This framework has been the cornerstone of the so-called ‘oxidative cost of reproduction’, a theory that remains controversial and relatively overlooked in non-model ectotherms. Here, we used two complementary approaches in natural and controlled conditions to test whether altered access to climate conditions (water and temperature resources) alters oxidative status and mediates reproductive trade-offs...

Data from: How neighbourhood interactions control the temporal stability and resilience to drought of trees in mountain forests

Marion Jourdan, Georges Kunstler & Xavier Morin
1. Over the coming decades, the predicted increase in frequency and intensity of extreme events such as droughts is likely to have a strong effect on forest functioning. Recent studies have shown that species mixing may buffer the temporal variability of productivity. However, most studies have focused on temporal stability of productivity, while species mixing may also affect forest resilience to extreme events. Our understanding of mechanisms underlying species mixing effects on forest stability and...

Cocoa agroforest multifunctionality and soil fertility explained by shade tree litter traits

Marie Sauvadet, Stéphane Saj, Grégoire Freschet, Jean-Daniel Essobo, Séguy Enock, Thierry Becquer, Philippe Tixier & Jean-Michel Harmand
Manipulating plant functional diversity to improve agroecosystem multifunctionality is a central challenge of agricultural systems worldwide. In cocoa agroforestry systems (cAFS), shade trees are used to supply many services to farmers, yet their impact on soil functioning and cocoa yields is likely to vary substantially among tree species. Here, we compared the impact of five shade tree species (Canarium schweinfurthii (Canarium), Dacryoides edulis (Safou), Milicia excelsa (Iroko), Ceiba pentandra (Kapok tree), Albizia adianthifolia (Albizia)) and...

Data from: Reproductives and eggs trigger worker vibration in a subterranean termite

Fanny Ruhland, Marion Moulin, Marina Choppin, Joël Meunier & Christophe Lucas
In insect societies, the presence of reproductives or eggs has been shown to shape several biological traits in the colony members. Social interactions are one of these traits, that involve modification of the communication system of the entire colony. Many studies described the role of chemical compounds and dominance behaviors in the presence of reproductive but vibratory behaviors received very few investigations. Yet, vibratory behaviors are ideal candidates, particularly for subterranean species like termites, as...

Data from: Na+/K+‐ATPase gene duplications in clitellate annelids are associated with freshwater colonization

Kevin M. Horn, Bronwyn W. Williams, Christer Erséus, Kenneth M. Halanych, Scott R. Santos, Michel Des Châtelliers Creuzé & Frank E. Anderson
Major habitat transitions, such as those from marine to freshwater habitats or from aquatic to terrestrial habitats, have occurred infrequently in animal evolution and may represent a barrier to diversification. Identifying genomic events associated with these transitions can help us better understand mechanisms that allow animals to cross these barriers and diversify in new habitats. Study of the Capitella telata and Helobdella robusta genomes allows examination of one such habitat transition (marine to freshwater) in...

Data from: Phylum-wide comparative genomics unravel the diversity of secondary metabolism in Cyanobacteria

Alexandra Calteau, David P. Fewer, Amel Latifi, Thérèse Coursin, Thierry Laurent, Jouni Jokela, Cheryl A. Kerfeld, Kaarina Sivonen, Jörn Piel & Muriel Gugger
Background: Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of photosynthetic bacteria from which hundreds of natural products have been described, including many notorious toxins but also potent natural products of interest to the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries. Many of these compounds are the products of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) or polyketide synthase (PKS) pathways. However, current understanding of the diversification of these pathways is largely based on the chemical structure of the bioactive compounds, while the evolutionary...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding diet analysis for species with parapatric versus sympatric distribution: a case study on subterranean rodents

Carla M. Lopes, Marta De Barba, Frédéric Boyer, Céline Mercier, Pedro J. S. Da Silva Filho, Laura M. Heidtmann, Daniel Galiano, Bruno B. Kubiak, Patrícia Langone, Felipe M. Garcias, Ludovic Gielly, Eric Coissac, Thales R. O. De Freitas & Pierre Taberlet
Closely related sympatric species commonly develop different ecological strategies to avoid competition. Ctenomys minutus and C. flamarioni are subterranean rodents parapatrically distributed in the southern Brazilian coastal plain, showing a narrow sympatric zone. To gain understanding on food preferences and possible competition for food resources, we evaluated their diet composition performing DNA metabarcoding analyzes of 67 C. minutus and 100 C. flamarioni scat samples, collected along the species geographical ranges. Thirteen plant families, mainly represented...

Data from: Movement propensity and ability correlate with ecological specialisation in European land snails: comparative analysis of a dispersal syndrome

Maxime Dahirel, Eric Olivier, Annie Guiller, Marie-Claire Martin, Luc Madec & Armelle Ansart
Intra- and inter-specific differences in movement behaviour play an important role in the ecology and evolution of animals, particularly in fragmented landscapes. As a consequence of rarer and generally more fragmented habitat, and because dispersal tends to disrupt benefits brought by local adaptation, theory predicts that mobility and dispersal should be counter-selected in specialists. Using experimental data and phylogenetic comparative tools, we analysed movement propensity and capacity, as well as dispersal-related phenotypic traits, in controlled...

Data from: Fire evolution in the radioactive forests of Ukraine and Belarus: future risks for the population and the environment

Nikolaos Evangeliou, Yves Balkanski, Anne Cozic, Wei Min Hao, Florent Mouillot, Kirsten Thonicke, Ronan Paugam, Sergey Zibtsev, Timothy A. Mousseau, Rong Wang, Benjamin Poulter, Alex Petkov, Chao Yue, Patricia Cadule, Brigitte Koffi, Johannes W. Kaiser & Anders Pape Møller
This paper analyzes the current and future status of forests in Ukraine and Belarus that were contaminated after the nuclear disaster in 1986. Using several models, together with remote sensing data and observations, we studied how climate change in these forests may affect fire regimes. We investigated the possibility of 137Cs displacement over Europe by studying previous fire events, and examined three fire scenarios that depended on different emission altitudes of 137Cs, assuming that 10%...

Data from: Gene copy number variations as signatures of adaptive evolution in the parthenogenetic, plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne incognita

Philippe Castagnone-Sereno, Karine Mulet, Etienne G. J. Danchin, Georgios D. Koutsovoulos, Mégane Karaulic, Martine Da Rocha, Marc Bailly-Bechet, Loris Pratx, Laetitia Perfus-Barbeoch & Pierre Abad
Adaptation to changing environmental conditions represents a challenge to parthenogenetic organisms and until now, how phenotypic variants are generated in clones in response to the selection pressure of their environment remains poorly known. The obligatory parthenogenetic root-knot nematode species Meloidogyne incognita has a worldwide distribution and is the most devastating plant-parasitic nematode. Despite its asexual reproduction, this species exhibits an unexpected capacity of adaptation to environmental constraints, e.g., resistant hosts. Here we used a genome-wide...

Data from: Ecology of information: social transmission dynamics within groups of non-social insects

Marine Battesti, Cristian Pasquaretta, Celine Moreno, Serafino Teseo, Dominique Joly, Elizabeth Klensch, Odile Petit, Cedric Sueur & Frederic Mery
While many studies focus on how animals use public information, the dynamics of information spread and maintenance within groups, i.e. the ‘ecology of information’, have received little attention. Here we use fruitflies trained to lay eggs on specific substrates to implement information into groups containing both trained and untrained individuals. We quantify inter-individual interactions and then measure the spread of oviposition preference with behavioural tests. Untrained individuals increase their interactive approaches in the presence of...

Data from: Female reproduction bears no survival cost in captivity for grey mouse lemurs

Julie Landes, Pierre-Yves Henry, Isablle Hardy, Martine Perret & Samuel Pavard
The survival cost of reproduction has been revealed in many free-ranging vertebrates. However, recent studies on captive populations failed to detect this cost. Theoretically, this lack of survival/reproduction trade-off is expected when resources are not limiting, but these studies may have failed to detect the cost, as they may not have fully accounted for potential confounding effects, in particular inter-individual heterogeneity. Here we investigated the effects of current and past reproductive effort on later survival...

Data from: A functional diversity approach of crop sequences reveals that weed diversity and abundance show different responses to environmental variability

Lucie Mahaut, Sabrina Gaba & Guillaume Fried
1. Combining several crop species and associated agricultural practices in a crop sequence has the potential to control weed abundance while promoting weed diversity in arable fields. However, how the variability of environmental conditions that arise from crop sequences affects weed diversity and abundance remains poorly understood, with most studies to-date simply opposing weed communities in monoculture and in crop rotation. Here, we describe crop sequences along gradients of disturbance and resource variability using a...

Data from: Biotic and abiotic drivers of species loss rate in isolated lakes

Céline Bellard, Göran Englund & Bernard Hugueny
1. Today, anthropogenic impacts are causing a serious crisis for global biodiversity, with rates of extinction increasing at an unprecedented rate. Extinctions typically occur after a certain delay and understanding the mechanisms causing delays is a key challenge for both fundamental and applied perspectives. 2. Here, we make use of natural experiments, the isolation of lakes by land up-lift in Northern Scandinavia, to examine how yearly extinction rates are affected by time since isolation and...

Data from: Genomics of the divergence continuum in an African plant biodiversity hotspot, I: drivers of population divergence in Restio capensis (Restionaceae)

Christian Lexer, Rafael O. Wüest, Sofia Mangili, Myriam Heuertz, Kai N. Stolting, Peter B. Pearman, Felix Forest, Nicolas Salamin, Niklaus E. Zimmermann & Eligio Bossolini
Understanding the drivers of population divergence, speciation and species persistence is of great interest to molecular ecology, especially for species-rich radiations inhabiting the world’s biodiversity hotspots. The toolbox of population genomics holds great promise for addressing these key issues, especially if genomic data are analyzed within a spatially and ecologically explicit context. We have studied the earliest stages of the divergence continuum in the Restionaceae, a species-rich and ecologically important plant family of the Cape...

Data from: Canonical correlations reveal adaptive loci and phenotypic responses to climate in perennial ryegrass

José L. Blanco-Pastor, Philippe Barre, Thomas Keep, Thomas Ledauphin, Abraham Escobar-Gutiérrez, Anna Maria Roschanski, Evelyn Willner, Klaus Dehmer, Matthew Hegarty, Hilde Muylle, Elisabeth Veeckman, Klaas Vandepoele, Tom Ruttink, Isabel Roldán-Ruiz, Stéphanie Manel & Jean-Paul Sampoux
Germplasm from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) natural populations is useful for breeding because of its adaptation to a wide range of climates. Climate-adaptive genes can be detected from associations between genotype, phenotype and climate but an integrated framework for the analysis of these three sources of information is lacking. We used two approaches to identify adaptive loci in perennial ryegrass and their effect on phenotypic traits. First, we combined Genome-Environment Association (GEA) and GWAS...

Data from: Some like it dry: water restriction overrides heterogametic sex determination in two reptiles

Andréaz Dupoué, Olivier Lourdais, Sandrine Meylan, François Brischoux, Frédéric Angelier, David Rozen-Rechels, Yoan Marcangeli, Beatriz Decencière, Simon Agostini & Jean-Francois Le Galliard
The evolution of sex determination is complex and yet crucial in our understanding of population stability. In ectotherms, sex determination involves a variety of mechanisms including genetic determination (GSD), environment determination (ESD), but also interactions between the two via sex reversal. In this study, we investigated whether water deprivation during pregnancy could override GSD in two heterogametic squamate reptiles. We demonstrated that water restriction in early gestation induced a male-biased secondary sex ratio in both...

Data from: Resting metabolic rate in migratory and non-migratory geese following range expansion; go south, go low

Götz Eichhorn, Manfred R. Enstipp, Jean-Yves Georges, Dennis Hasselquist & Bart A. Nolet
While many species suffer from human activities, some like geese benefit and may show range expansions. In some cases geese (partially) gave up migration and started breeding at wintering and stopover grounds. Range expansion may be facilitated and accompanied by physiological changes, especially when associated with changes in migratory behaviour. Interspecific comparisons found that migratory tendency is associated with a higher basal or resting metabolic rate (RMR). We compared RMR of individuals belonging to a...

Data from: The fitness effect of mutations across environments: Fisher’s geometrical model with multiple optima

Guillaume Martin & Thomas Lenormand
When are mutations beneficial in one environment and deleterious in another? More generally, what is the relationship between mutation effects across environments? These questions are crucial to predict adaptation in heterogeneous conditions in a broad sense. Empirical evidence documents various patterns of fitness effects across environments but we still lack a framework to analyse these multivariate data. In this paper, we extend Fisher’s geometrical model to multiple environments determining distinct peaks. We derive the fitness...

Data from: Evaluating the impact of genomic data and priors on Bayesian estimates of the angiosperm evolutionary timescale

Charles S. P. Foster, Hervé Sauquet, Marlien Van Der Merwe, Hannah McPherson, Maurizio Rossetto & Simon Y. W. Ho
The evolutionary timescale of angiosperms has long been a key question in biology. Molecular estimates of this timescale have shown considerable variation, being influenced by differences in taxon sampling, gene sampling, fossil calibrations, evolutionary models, and choices of priors. Here, we analyze a data set comprising 76 protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genomes of 195 taxa spanning 86 families, including novel genome sequences for 11 taxa, to evaluate the impact of models, priors, and gene...

Data from: The coupling hypothesis: why genome scans may fail to map local adaptation genes

Nicolas Bierne, John Welch, Etienne Loire, François Bonhomme & Patrice David
Genomic scans of multiple populations often reveal marker loci with greatly increased differentiation between populations. Often this differentiation coincides in space with contrasts in ecological factors, forming a genetic–environment association (GEA). GEAs imply a role for local adaptation, and so it is tempting to conclude that the strongly differentiated markers are themselves under ecologically based divergent selection, or are closely linked to loci under such selection. Here, we highlight an alternative and neglected explanation: intrinsic...

Data from: Cytonuclear discordance among the Southeast Asian Black rats (Rattus rattus complex)

Marie Pagès, Eric Bazin, Maxime Galan, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Vincent Herbreteau, Johan Michaux, Sylvain Piry, Serge Morand & Jean-François Cosson
Black rats are major invasive vertebrate pests with severe ecological, economic and health impacts. Remarkably, their evolutionary history has received little attention, and there is no firm agreement on how many species should be recognized within the black rat complex. This species complex is native to India and Southeast Asia. According to current taxonomic classification, there are three taxa living in sympatry in several parts of Thailand, Cambodia and Lao People's Democratic Republic, where this...

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