14 Works

Data from: Genome scans reveal candidate regions involved in the adaptation to host plant in the pea aphid complex

Julie Jaquiéry, Solenn Stoeckel, Pierre Nouhaud, Lucie Mieuzet, Frédérique Mahéo, Fabrice Legeai, Nina Bernard, Antoine Bonvoisin, Renaud Vitalis & Jean-Christophe Simon
A major goal in evolutionary biology is to uncover the genetic basis of adaptation. Divergent selection exerted on ecological traits may result in adaptive population differentiation and reproductive isolation and affect differentially the level of genetic divergence along the genome. Genome-wide scan of large sets of individuals from multiple populations is a powerful approach to identify loci or genomic regions under ecologically divergent selection. Here, we focused on the pea aphid, a species complex of...

Data from: Stretched to the limit; can a short pelagic larval duration connect adult populations of an Indo-Pacific diadromous fish (Kuhlia rupestris)?

Pierre Feutry, Alan Vergnes, Damien Broderick, Josie Lambourdière, Philippe Keith & Jennifer R. Ovenden
Freshwater species on tropical islands face localized extinction and the loss of genetic diversity. Their habitats can be ephemeral due to variability in freshwater run-off and erosion. Even worse, anthropogenic effects on these ecosystems are intense. Most of these species are amphidromous or catadromous (i.e. their life cycle includes a marine larval phase), which buffers them against many of these effects. A long pelagic larval duration (PLD) was thought to be critical to ensure the...

Data from: Genetic drift and collective dispersal can result in chaotic genetic patchiness

Thomas Broquet, Frédérique Viard, Jonathan M. Yearsley, Thomas Broquet, Frédérique Viard & Jonathan M. Yearsley
Chaotic genetic patchiness denotes unexpected patterns of genetic differentiation that are observed at a fine scale and are not stable in time. These patterns have been described in marine species with free-living larvae, but are unexpected because they occur at a scale below the dispersal range of pelagic larvae. At the scale where most larvae are immigrants, theory predicts spatially homogeneous, temporally stable genetic variation. Empirical studies have suggested that genetic drift interacts with complex...

Data from: Direct genetic evidence for reproductive philopatry and associated fine-scale migrations in female blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) in French Polynesia.

Johann Mourier & Serge Planes
Conservation of top predators has been emphasised as essential in an ecosystem due to their role in trophic chain regulation. Optimization of conservation strategies for these endangered marine top predators requires direct estimates of breeding patterns and connectivity, which are essential to understand their population dynamics. While there have been some attempts to investigate breeding patterns of reef sharks from litter reconstruction using molecular analyses, direct fine-scale migrations of female sharks for parturition as well...

Data from: Comparing van Oosterhout and Chybicki-Burczyk methods of estimating null allele frequencies for inbred populations

Pascal Campagne, Peter E. Smouse, Georges Varouchas, Jean-Francois Silvain, Bruno Le Rü, P. Campagne, J.-F. Silvain, B. Leru, G. Varouchas & P. E. Smouse
In spite of the usefulness of codominant markers in population genetics, the existence of null alleles raises challenging estimation issues in natural populations that are characterized by positive inbreeding coefficients (F > 0). Disregarding the possibility of F > 0 in a population will generally lead to overestimates of null allele frequencies. Conversely, estimates of inbreeding coefficients (F) may be strongly biased upwards (excess homozygotes), in the presence of nontrivial frequencies of null alleles. An...

Data from: Migratory constraints on yolk precursors limit yolk androgen deposition and underlie a brood reduction strategy in rockhopper penguins

Glenn T. Crossin, Maud Poisbleau, Laurent Demongin, Olivier Chastel, Tony D. Williams, Marcel Eens, Petra Quillfeldt, G. T. Crossin, L. Demongin, M. Eens, M. Poisbleau, O. Chastel & T. D. Williams
Hormonally mediated maternal effects link maternal phenotype and environmental conditions to offspring phenotype. The production of lipid-rich maternal yolk precursors may provide a mechanism by which lipophilic steroid hormones can be transported to developing yolks, thus predicting a positive correlation between yolk precursors in mothers and androgen levels in eggs. Using rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome), which produce a two-egg clutch characterized by extreme egg-size dimorphism, reversed hatching asynchrony and brood-reduction, we examined correlations between circulating...

Data from: Intergametophytic selfing and microgeographic genetic structure shape populations of the intertidal red seaweed Chondrus crispus

Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield, Denis Roze, Stephane Mauger, Myriam Valero, S. A. Krueger-Hadfield, D. Roze, S. Mauger & M. Valero
Understanding how abiotic factors influence the spatial distribution of genetic variation provides insight into microevolutionary processes. The intertidal seascape is characterized by highly heterogeneous habitats which probably influence the partitioning of genetic variation at very small scales. The effects of tidal height on genetic variation in both the haploid (gametophytes) and diploid (tetrasporophytes) stages of the red alga Chondrus crispus were studied. Fronds were sampled every 25 cm within a 5 m × 5 m...

Data from: Barriers to gene flow in the marine environment: insights from two common intertidal limpet species of the Atlantic and Mediterranean

Alexandra Sá Pinto, Madalena Simas Branco, Paulo Barros Alexandrino, Michaël C. Fontaine & Stuart J. E. Baird
Knowledge of the scale of dispersal and the mechanisms governing gene flow in marine environments remains fragmentary despite being essential for understanding evolution of marine biota and to design management plans. We use the limpets Patella ulyssiponensis and Patella rustica as models for identifying factors affecting gene flow in marine organisms across the North-East Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea. A set of allozyme loci and a fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome C oxidase subunit...

Data from: Kin selection, not group augmentation, predicts helping in an obligate cooperatively breeding bird

Lucy E. Browning, Samantha C. Patrick, Lee A. Rollins, Simon C. Griffith, Andrew F. Russell, S. C. Patrick, S. C. Griffith, L. A. Rollins & A. F. Russell
Kin selection theory has been the central model for understanding the evolution of cooperative breeding, where non-breeders help bear the cost of rearing young. Recently the dominance of this idea has been questioned; particularly in obligate cooperative breeders where breeding without help is uncommon and seldom successful. In such systems, the direct benefits gained through augmenting current group size have been hypothesised to provide a tractable alternative (or addition) to kin selection. However, clear empirical...

Data from: Mature male parr contribution to the effective size of an anadromous Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) population over 30 years

Devon L. Johnstone, Michael F. O'Connell, Friso P. Palstra & Daniel E. Ruzzante
We describe temporal changes in the genetic composition of a small anadromous Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) population from South Newfoundland, an area where salmon populations are considered threatened (COSEWIC 2010). We examined the genetic variability (13 microsatellite loci) in 869 out-migrating smolt and post-spawning kelt samples, collected from 1985 to 2011 for a total of 22 annual collections and a 30 year span of assigned cohorts. We estimated the annual effective number of breeders (Nb)...

Data from: Testing and quantifying phylogenetic signals and homoplasy in morphometric data

Christian Peter Klingenberg, Nelly A. Gidaszewski, Christian Peter Klingenberg & Nelly A. Gidaszewski
The relationship between morphometrics and phylogenetic analysis has long been controversial. Here we propose an approach that is based on mapping morphometric traits onto phylogenies derived from other data and thus avoids the pitfalls encountered by previous studies. This method treats shape as a single, multidimensional character. We propose a test for the presence of a phylogenetic signal in morphometric data, which simulates the null hypothesis of the complete absence of phylogenetic structure by permutation...

Data from: Contrasting patterns of genome-wide polymorphism in the native and invasive range of the marine mollusk Crepidula fornicata

Florentine Riquet, Claire Daguin-Thiébaut, Marion Ballenghien, Nicolas Bierne & Frederique Viard
Selection processes are believed to be an important evolutionary driver behind the successful establishment of non-indigenous species, however evidence is still scarce. Genome-scans have often identified loci with atypical patterns of genetic differentiation (i.e. outliers) indicative of selection processes. Using microsatellite- and AFLP-based genome-scans, we looked for evidence of post-introduction selection in the mollusk Crepidula fornicata, native from the northwestern Atlantic and introduced in the northeastern Atlantic and northeastern Pacific during the 19th and 20th...

Data from: Cytonuclear discordance among the Southeast Asian Black rats (Rattus rattus complex)

Marie Pagès, Eric Bazin, Maxime Galan, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Vincent Herbreteau, Johan Michaux, Sylvain Piry, Serge Morand & Jean-François Cosson
Black rats are major invasive vertebrate pests with severe ecological, economic and health impacts. Remarkably, their evolutionary history has received little attention, and there is no firm agreement on how many species should be recognized within the black rat complex. This species complex is native to India and Southeast Asia. According to current taxonomic classification, there are three taxa living in sympatry in several parts of Thailand, Cambodia and Lao People's Democratic Republic, where this...

Data from: Are species’ responses to global change predicted by past niche evolution?

Sébastien Lavergne, Margaret E. K. Evans, Ian J. Burfield, Frederic Jiguet, Wilfried Thuiller, S. Lavergne & W. Thuiller
Predicting how and when adaptive evolution might rescue species from global change, and integrating this process into tools of biodiversity forecasting, has now become an urgent task. Here we explored whether recent population trends of species can be explained by their past rate of niche evolution, which can be inferred from increasingly available phylogenetic and niche data. We examined the assemblage of 409 European bird species for which estimates of demographic trends between 1970 and...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    14
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    2
  • University of Paris-Sud
    2
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Macquarie University
    1
  • Mahidol University
    1
  • Simon Fraser University
    1
  • University of Manchester
    1
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    1
  • Montpellier SupAgro
    1
  • University of Exeter
    1
  • Charles Darwin University
    1