84 Works

Data from: Relationship between spectral characteristics of spontaneous postural sway and motion sickness susceptibility

Rafael Laboissière, Corinne Cian, Michel Mazzuca & Pierre-Alain Barraud
Motion sickness (MS) usually occurs for a narrow band of frequencies of the imposed oscillation. It happens that this frequency band is close to that which are spontaneously produced by postural sway during natural stance. This study examined the relationship between reported susceptibility to motion sickness and postural control. The hypothesis is that the level of MS can be inferred from the shape of the Power Spectral Density (PSD) profile of spontaneous sway, as measured...

Data from: Long-lasting modification of soil fungal diversity associated with the introduction of rabbits to a remote sub-Antarctic archipelago

Johan Pansu, Richard C. Winkworth, Françoise Hennion, Ludovic Gielly, Pierre Taberlet & Philippe Choler
During the late nineteenth century, Europeans introduced rabbits to many of the sub-Antarctic islands, environments that prior to this had been devoid of mammalian herbivores. The impacts of rabbits on indigenous ecosystems are well studied; notably, they cause dramatic changes in plant communities and promote soil erosion. However, the responses of fungal communities to such biotic disturbances remain unexplored. We used metabarcoding of soil extracellular DNA to assess the diversity of plant and fungal communities...

Data from: The complex phylogeography of the Indo-Malayan Alophoixus bulbuls with the description of a putative new ring species complex

Jérôme Fuchs, Per G. P. Ericson, Céline Bonillo, Arnaud Couloux & Eric Pasquet
The Indo-Malayan bioregion has provided some of the most spectacular discoveries of new vertebrate species (e.g. saola, khanyou, bare-faced bulbul) over the last 25 years. Yet, very little is known about the processes that led to the current biodiversity in this region. We reconstructed the phylogeographic history of a group of closely related passerines, the Alophoixus bulbuls. These birds are continuously distributed in Indo-Malaya around the Thailand lowlands such that their distribution resembles a ring....

Data from: The building of a biodiversity hotspot across a land-bridge in the Mediterranean

Rafael Molina-Venegas, Abelardo Aparicio, Sébastien Lavergne & Juan Arroyo
Many of the macroevolutionary processes that have shaped present-day phylogenetic patterns were caused by geological events such as plate tectonics and temporary land-bridges. The study of spatial patterns of phylogenetic diversity can provide insights into these past events. Here we focus on a western Mediterranean biodiversity hotspot located in the southern Iberian Peninsula and northwest Africa, two regions that are separated by the Strait of Gibraltar. We explore the spatial structure of the phylogenetic relationships...

Data from: An integrated assessment model of seabird population dynamics: can individual heterogeneity in susceptibility to fishing explain abundance trends in Crozet wandering albatross?

Geoffrey N. Tuck, Robin B. Thomson, Christophe Barbraud, Karine Delord, Maite Louzao, Miguel Herrera & Henri Weimerskirch
1. Seabirds have been incidentally caught in distant-water longline fleets operating in the Southern Ocean since at least the 1970s, and breeding numbers for some populations have shown marked trends of decline and recovery concomitant with longline fishing effort within their distributions. However, lacking is an understanding of how forms of among-individual heterogeneity may interact with fisheries bycatch and influence population dynamics. 2. We develop a model that uses comprehensive data on the spatial and...

Data from: On the evolutionary interplay between dispersal and local adaptation in heterogeneous environments

Andrew M. Berdahl, Colin J. Torney, Emmanuel Schertzer, Simon A. Levin & Andrew Berdahl
Dispersal, whether in the form of a dandelion seed drifting on the breeze, or a salmon migrating upstream to breed in a non-natal stream, transports genes between locations. At these locations, local adaptation modifies the gene frequencies so their carriers are better suited to particular conditions, be those of newly disturbed soil or a quiet river pool. Both dispersal and local adaptation are major drivers of population structure; however, in general, their respective roles are...

Data from: Spatial variation in age structure among populations of a colonial marine snake: the influence of ectothermy

Xavier Bonnet, François Brischoux, David Pinaud, Richard Shine, Catherine Louise Michel, Jean Clobert & Thomas Fauvel
1. Several tetrapod lineages that have evolved to exploit marine environments (e.g. seals, seabirds, sea kraits) continue to rely upon land for reproduction and, thus, form dense colonies on suitable islands. 2. In birds and mammals (endotherms), the offspring cannot survive without their parents. Terrestrial colonies contain all age classes. In reptiles (ectotherms), this constraint is relaxed, because offspring are independent from birth. Hence, each age class has the potential to select sites with characteristics...

Data from: Odourant dominance in olfactory mixture processing: what makes a strong odourant

M. Schubert, J.C. Sandoz, G.C. Galizia, M. Giurfa, J.-C. Sandoz & G. Galizia
The question of how animals process stimulus mixtures remains controversial as opposing views propose that mixtures are processed analytically, as the sum of their elements, or holistically, as unique entities different from their elements. Overshadowing is a widespread phenomenon that can help decide between these alternatives. In overshadowing, an individual trained with a binary mixture learns one element better at the expense of the other. Although element salience (learning success) has been suggested as a...

Data from: Evolutionary factors affecting the cross-species utility of newly developed microsatellite markers in seabirds

Yoshan Moodley, Juan F. Masello, Gopi K. Munimanda, Theresa L. Cole, Marco R. Thali, Rachael Alderman, Richard J. Cuthbert, Manuel Marin, Melanie Massaro, Joan Navarro, Richard A. Phillips, Peter G. Ryan, Cristián G. Suazo, Yves Cherel, Henri Weimerskirch, Petra Quillfeldt & Luciano Calderon
Microsatellite loci are ideal for testing hypotheses relating to genetic segregation at fine spatio-temporal scales. They are also conserved among closely related species, making them potentially useful for clarifying interspecific relationships between recently diverged taxa. However, mutations at primer binding sites may lead to increased nonamplification, or disruptions that may result in decreased polymorphism in nontarget species. Furthermore, high mutation rates and constraints on allele size may also with evolutionary time, promote an increase in...

Data from: Climate interacts with anthropogenic drivers to determine extirpation dynamics

Lise Comte, Bernard Hugueny & Gaël Grenouillet
Theoretical studies suggest that the dynamics of a species’ range during a period of climate change depends upon the existence and interplay of various ecological and evolutionary processes. Here we tested how anthropogenic pressures contribute to climate-mediated extirpation patterns of 32 freshwater fish species over the last 20 yr. We contrasted two extreme cases to determine whether extirpations were governed by patterns of climate exposure, assuming full adaptation of species to local climate, or instead...

Data from: Plant–plant interactions as a mechanism structuring plant diversity in a Mediterranean semi-arid ecosystem

Antonio I. Arroyo, Yolanda Pueyo, Hugo Saiz & Concepción L. Alados
Plant–plant interactions are among the fundamental processes that shape structure and functioning of arid and semi-arid plant communities. Despite the large amount of studies that have assessed the relationship between plant–plant interactions (i.e., facilitation and competition) and diversity, often researchers forget a third kind of interaction, known as allelopathy. We examined the effect of plant–plant interactions of three dominant species: the perennial grass Lygeum spartum, the allelopathic dwarf shrub Artemisia herba-alba, and the nurse shrub...

Data from: From steps to home range formation: species-specific movement upscaling among sympatric ungulates

Zulima Tablado, Eloy Revilla, Dominique Dubray, Sonia Saïd, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Animals move to interact with the environment in order to find food resources and cover. Intrinsic characteristics affecting feeding and antipredatory strategies likely shape variation in movement patterns and home range formation between individuals, populations and species. Browsing herbivores selectively forage on patchily distributed resources in areas with more canopy cover, whereas mixed feeders and grazers feed on more open grasslands and tend to aggregate as an antipredatory strategy. We therefore predicted that at small...

Data from: "De novo assembly transcriptome for the rostrum dace (Leuciscus burdigalensis, Cyprinidae: fish) naturally infected by a copepod ectoparasite" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 December 2014 to 31 January 2015

Olivier Rey, Géraldine Loot, Olivier Bouchez, Simon Blanchet, Maria Jose Ruiz-Lopez, Nelson Ting, Paul D. Etter, Eric A. Johnson, Tony L. Goldberg, Colin A. Chapman, James H. Jones, Patrick A. Omeja & William M. Switzer
The emergence of pathogens represents substantial threats to public health, livestock, domesticated animals, and biodiversity. How wild populations respond to emerging pathogens has generated a lot of interest in the last two decades. With the recent advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies it is now possible to develop large transcriptomic resources for non-model organisms, hence allowing new research avenues on the immune responses of hosts from a large taxonomic spectra. We here focused on a wild...

Data from: Automixis in Artemia: solving a century-old controversy

Odrade Nougué, Nicolas O. Rode, Roula Zahab, Adeline Ségard, Luis-Miguel Chevin, Christoph R. Haag, Thomas Lenormand & R. Jabbour-Zahab
Parthenogenesis (reproduction through unfertilized eggs) encompasses a variety of reproduction modes with (automixis) or without (apomixis) meiosis. Different modes of automixis have very different genetic and evolutionary consequences but can be particularly difficult to tease apart. In this paper, we propose a new method to discriminate different types of automixis from population-level genetic data. We apply this method to diploid Artemia parthenogenetica, a crustacean whose reproductive mode remains controversial despite a century of intensive cytogenetic...

Data from: Genetic isolation between two recently diverged populations of a symbiotic fungus

Sara Branco, Pierre Gladieux, Christopher E. Ellison, Alan Kuo, Kurt LaButii, Anna Lipzen, Igor V. Grigoriev, Hui-Ling Liao, Rytas Vilgalys, Kabir G. Peay, John W. Taylor, Thomas D. Bruns & Kurt LaButti
Fungi are an omnipresent and highly diverse group of organisms, making up a significant part of eukaryotic diversity. Little is currently known about the drivers of fungal population differentiation and subsequent divergence of species, particularly in symbiotic, mycorrhizal fungi. Here, we investigate the population structure and environmental adaptation in Suillus brevipes (Peck) Kuntze, a wind-dispersed soil fungus that is symbiotic with pine trees. We assembled and annotated the reference genome for Su. brevipes and resequenced...

Data from: Next-generation monitoring of aquatic biodiversity using environmental DNA metabarcoding

Alice Valentini, Pierre Taberlet, Claude Miaud, Raphaël Civade, Jelger Herder, Philip Francis Thomsen, Eva Bellemain, Aurélien Besnard, Eric Coissac, Frédéric Boyer, Coline Gaboriaud, Pauline Jean, Nicolas Poulet, Nicolas Roset, Gordon H. Copp, Philippe Geniez, Didier Pont, Christine Argillier, Jean-Marc Baudoin, Tiphaine Peroux, Alain J. Crivelli, Anthony Olivier, Manon Acqueberge, Matthieu Le Brun, Peter Rask Møller … & Tony Dejean
Global biodiversity in freshwater and the oceans is declining at high rates. Reliable tools for assessing and monitoring aquatic biodiversity, especially for rare and secretive species, are important for efficient and timely management. Recent advances in DNA sequencing have provided a new tool for species detection from DNA present into the environment. In this study, we tested if an environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding approach, using water samples, can be used for addressing significant questions in...

Data from: The role of defensive ecological interactions in the evolution of conotoxins

Jutty Rajan Prashanth, Sebastien Dutertre, Ai-Hua Jin, Vincent Lavergne, Brett Hamilton, Fernanda C. Cardoso, John Griffin, Deon J. Venter, Paul F. Alewood, Richard J. Lewis, B. Hamilton, D. J. Venter, J. Griffin, J. R. Prashanth, S. Dutertre, A. H. Jin, V. Lavergne, F. C. Cardoso, P. F. Alewood & R. J. Lewis
Venoms comprise of complex mixtures of peptides evolved for predation and defensive purposes. Remarkably, some carnivorous cone snails can inject two distinct venoms in response to predatory or defensive stimuli, providing a unique opportunity to study separately how different ecological pressures contribute to toxin diversification. Here, we report the extraordinary defensive strategy of the Rhizoconus subgenus of cone snails. The defensive venom from this worm-hunting subgenus is unusually simple, almost exclusively composed of αD-conotoxins instead...

Data from: Phenotypic variability in unicellular organisms: from calcium signaling to social behavior

David Vogel, Stamatios C. Nicolis, Alfonso Perez-Escudero, Vidyanand Nanjundiah, David J. T. Sumpter & Audrey Dussutour
Historically, research has focused on the mean and often neglected the variance. However, variability in nature is observable at all scales: among cells within an individual, among individuals within a population and among populations within a species. A fundamental quest in biology now is to find the mechanisms that underlie variability. Here, we investigated behavioural variability in a unique unicellular organism, Physarum polycephalum. We combined experiments and models to show that variability in cell signalling...

Data from: Non-consumptive effects of a top-predator decrease the strength of the trophic cascade in a four-level terrestrial food web

Elvire Bestion, Julien Cucherousset, Aimeric Teyssier & Julien Cote
The fear of predators can strongly impact food web dynamics and ecosystem functioning through effects on herbivores morphology, physiology or behaviour. While non-consumptive predator effects have been mostly studied in three-level food chains, we lack evidence for the propagation of non-consumptive indirect effects of apex predators in four level food-webs, notably in terrestrial ecosystems. In experimental mesocosms, we manipulated a four-level food chain including top-predator cues (snakes), mesopredators (lizards), herbivores (crickets), and primary producers (plants)....

Data from: Extreme ecological response of a seabird community to unprecedented sea ice cover

Christophe Barbraud, Karine Delord, Henri Weimerskirch, C. Barbraud, K. Delord & H. Weimerskirch
Climate change has been predicted to reduce Antarctic sea ice but, instead, sea ice surrounding Antarctica has expanded over the past 30 years, albeit with contrasted regional changes. Here we report a recent extreme event in sea ice conditions in East Antarctica and investigate its consequences on a seabird community. In early 2014, the Dumont d'Urville Sea experienced the highest magnitude sea ice cover (76.8%) event on record (1982–2013: range 11.3–65.3%; mean±95% confidence interval: 27.7%...

Data from: Social information from immigrants: multiple immigrant based sources of information for dispersal decisions in a ciliate

Staffan Jacob, Alexis S. Chaine, Nicolas Schtickzelle, Michèle Huet & Jean Clobert
1. Dispersal is increasingly recognized as being an informed process, based on information organisms obtain about the landscape. While local conditions are often found to drive dispersal decisions, local context is not always a reliable predictor of conditions in neighbouring patches, making the use of local information potentially useless or even maladaptive. In this case, using social information gathered by immigrants might allow adjusting dispersal decisions without paying the costs of prospecting. However, this hypothesis...

Data from: Antagonistic effect of helpers on breeding male and female survival in a cooperatively breeding bird

Matthieu Paquet, Claire Doutrelant, Ben J. Hatchwell, Claire N. Spottiswoode & Rita Covas
1. Cooperatively breeding species are typically long lived and hence, according to theory, are expected to maximize their lifetime reproductive success through maximizing survival. Under these circumstances, the presence of helpers could be used to lighten the effort of current reproduction for parents to achieve higher survival. 2. In addition, individuals of different sexes and ages may follow different strategies, but whether male and female breeders and individuals of different ages benefit differently from the...

Data from: A quantitative framework for investigating risk of deadly collisions between marine wildlife and boats

Julien Martin, Quentin Sabatier, Timothy A. Gowan, Christophe Giraud, Eliezer Gurarie, C. Scott Calleson, Joel G. Ortega-Ortiz, Charles J. Deutsch, Athena Rycyk, Stacie M. Koslovsky & Charles Scott Calleson
Speed regulations of watercraft in protected areas are designed to reduce lethal collisions with wildlife but can have economic consequences. We present a quantitative framework for investigating the risk of deadly collisions between boats and wildlife. We apply encounter rate theory to demonstrate how marine mammal-boat encounter rate can be used to predict the expected number of deaths associated with management scenarios. We illustrate our approach with management scenarios for two endangered species: the Florida...

Data from: Linkage of plant trait space to successional age and species richness in boreal forest understory vegetation

Bright B. Kumordzi, Francesco De Bello, Grégoire Freschet, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Jan Lepš & David A. Wardle
Determining the changes in within- and between-species functional diversity in plant communities, and their contribution to overall species trait overlap, can enhance efforts at understanding mechanisms of species coexistence. However, little is known about how variation in species functional diversity influences variation in species trait overlap among contrasting environments. Here, we studied the understorey vegetation in a well-characterized 5000-year-old chronosequence involving 30 forested islands that differ greatly in size, soil fertility, and species diversity. Across...

Data from: Recasting the dynamic equilibrium model through a functional lens: the interplay of trait-based community assembly and climate

Jessy Loranger, Cyrille Violle, Bill Shipley, Sandra Lavorel, Anne Bonis, Pablo Cruz, Frédérique Louault, Grégory Loucougaray, François Mesléard, Nicole Yavercovski & Éric Garnier
1. According to the dynamic equilibrium hypothesis (DEH), plant species richness is locally controlled by productivity and disturbance. Given that regional conditions widely affect local environmental variables such as soil nutrient availability, the DEH predictions could be improved by considering how climate influences local controls of species richness. Further, a trait-based approach to community assembly has the potential to reveal a deeper, mechanistic understanding of species richness variation across environments. Here we bring together DEH...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    84

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    84

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    84
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    13
  • University of California System
    5
  • University of Toulouse
    5
  • University of Cape Town
    5
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    4
  • University of Cambridge
    4
  • Uppsala University
    4
  • University of Paris-Sud
    3
  • Grenoble Alpes University
    3
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • University of Porto
    3
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • Ghent University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2