55 Works

Data from: The fitness effect of mutations across environments: Fisher’s geometrical model with multiple optima

Guillaume Martin & Thomas Lenormand
When are mutations beneficial in one environment and deleterious in another? More generally, what is the relationship between mutation effects across environments? These questions are crucial to predict adaptation in heterogeneous conditions in a broad sense. Empirical evidence documents various patterns of fitness effects across environments but we still lack a framework to analyse these multivariate data. In this paper, we extend Fisher’s geometrical model to multiple environments determining distinct peaks. We derive the fitness...

Data from: Nest signature changes throughout colony cycle and after social parasite invasion in social wasps

Marta Elia, Giuliano Blancato, Laura Picchi, Christophe Lucas, Anne-Genevieve Bagneres & Maria Cristina Lorenzi
Social insects recognize their nestmates by means of a cuticular hydrocarbon signature shared by colony members, but how nest signature changes across time has been rarely tested in longitudinal studies and in the field. In social wasps, the chemical signature is also deposited on the nest surface, where it is used by newly emerged wasps as a reference to learn their colony odor. Here, we investigate the temporal variations of the chemical signature that wasps...

Data from: Chaos and the (un)predictability of evolution in a changing environment

Artur Rego Costa, Florence Débarre, Luis-Miguel Chevin & Artur Rego-Costa
Among the factors that may reduce the predictability of evolution, chaos, characterized by a strong dependence on initial conditions, has received much less attention than randomness due to genetic drift or environmental stochasticity. It was recently shown that chaos in phenotypic evolution arises commonly under frequency-dependent selection caused by competitive interactions mediated by many traits. This result has been used to argue that chaos should often make evolutionary dynamics unpredictable. However, populations also evolve largely...

Data from: Combining noninvasive genetics and a new mammalian sex-linked marker provides new tools to investigate population size, structure and individual behaviour: an application to bats

Diane Zarzoso-Lacoste, Pierre-Loup Jan, Lisa Lehnen, Thomas Girard, Anne-Laure Besnard, Sebastien J. Puechmaille & Eric J. Petit
Monitoring wild populations is crucial for their effective management. Noninvasive genetic methods provide robust data from individual free-ranging animals, which can be used in capture-mark-recapture (CMR) models to estimate demographic parameters without capturing or disturbing them. However, sex- and status-specific behaviour, which may lead to differences in detection probabilities, is rarely considered in monitoring. Here, we investigated population size, sex ratio, sex- and status-related behaviour in 19 Rhinolophus hipposideros maternity colonies (Northern France) with a...

Data from: Selection on skewed characters and the paradox of stasis

Suzanne Bonamour, Céline Teplitsky, Anne Charmantier, Pierre-André Crochet & Luis-Miguel Chevin
Observed phenotypic responses to selection in the wild often differ from predictions based on measurements of selection and genetic variance. An overlooked hypothesis to explain this paradox of stasis is that a skewed phenotypic distribution affects natural selection and evolution. We show through mathematical modelling that, when a trait selected for an optimum phenotype has a skewed distribution, directional selection is detected even at evolutionary equilibrium, where it causes no change in the mean phenotype....

Data from: Morphological integration in the appendicular skeleton of two domestic taxa: the horse and donkey

Pauline Hanot, Anthony Herrel, Claude Guintard & Raphaël Cornette
Organisms are organized into suites of anatomical structures that typically covary when developmentally or functionally related, and this morphological integration plays a determinant role in evolutionary processes. Artificial selection on domestic species causes strong morphological changes over short time spans, frequently resulting in a wide and exaggerated phenotypic diversity. This raises the question of whether integration constrains the morphological diversification of domestic species and how natural and artificial selection may impact integration patterns. Here, we...

Data from: Riders in the sky (islands): using a mega-phylogenetic approach to understand plant species distribution and coexistence at the altitudinal limits of angiosperm plant life

Hannah E. Marx, Cédric Dentant, Julien Renaud, Romain Delunel, David C. Tank & Sébastien Lavergne
Aim: Plants occurring on high-alpine summits are generally expected to persist due to adaptations to extreme selective forces caused by the harshest climates where angiosperm life is known to thrive. We assessed the relative effects of this strong environmental filter and of other historical and stochastic factors driving plant community structure in very high-alpine conditions. Location: European Alps, Écrins National Park, France. Methods: Using species occurrence data collected from floristic surveys on 15 summits (2,791–4,102...

Data from: Processing of acceleration and dive data on-board satellite relay tags to investigate diving and foraging behaviour in free-ranging marine predators

Sam L. Cox, F. Orgeret, M. Gesta, C. Rodde, I. Heizer, H. Weimerskirch, C. Guinet, Florian Orgeret, Mathieu Gesta, Charles Rodde, Henri Weimerskirch & Christophe Guinet
1. Biologging technologies are changing the way in which the marine environment is observed and monitored. However, because device retrieval is generally required to access the high resolution data they collect, use is generally restricted to those animals that predictably return to land. Data abstraction and transmission techniques aim to address this, although currently these are limited in scope and do not incorporate, for example, acceleration measurements which can quantify animal behaviours and movement patterns...

Data from: A reassessment of explanations for discordant introgressions of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes

Timothée Bonnet, Raphaël Leblois, Francois Rousset & Pierre-André Crochet
Hybridization is increasingly recognized as a significant evolutionary process, in particular because it can lead to introgression of genes from one species to another. A striking pattern of discordance in the amount of introgression between mitochondrial and nuclear markers exists such that substantial mitochondrial introgression is often found in combination with no or little nuclear introgression. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain this discordance, including positive selection for introgressing mitochondrial variants, several types of...

Data from: The effects of climate change on a mega-diverse country: predicted shifts in mammalian species richness and turnover in continental Ecuador.

Paula Iturralde-Pólit, Olivier Dangles, Santiago F. Burneo & Christine N. Meynard
Ecuador is one of 17 nations with the greatest diversity in the world, sheltering lowland and mountain regions that are considered global biodiversity hotspots. While these regions are projected to be highly impacted by climate change, it is not clear what would be the consequences for faunal diversity and conservation. To address this issue, we used an ensemble of 8 species distribution models (SDM) to determine future shifts and identify areas of high changes in...

Data from: Generalized bootstrap supports for phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences incorporating alignment uncertainty

Maria Chatzou, Evan Wade Floden, Paolo Di Tommaso, Olivier Gascuel, Cedric Notredame & Evan W Floden
Phylogenetic reconstructions are essential in genomics data analyses and depend on accurate multiple sequence alignment (MSA) models. We show that all currently available large-scale progressive multiple alignment methods are numerically unstable when dealing with amino-acid sequences. They produce significantly different output when changing sequence input order. We used the HOMFAM protein sequences dataset to show that on datasets larger than 100 sequences, this instability affects on average 21.5% of the aligned residues. The resulting Maximum...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Data from: Projected distributions of Southern Ocean albatrosses, petrels and fisheries as a consequence of climatic change

L. Krüger, J. A. Ramos, J. C. Xavier, D. Grémillet, J. González-Solís, M. V. Petry, R. A. Phillips, R. M. Wanless, V. H. Paiva & Lucas Krüger
Given the major ongoing influence of environmental change on the oceans, there is a need to understand and predict the future distributions of marine species in order to plan appropriate mitigation to conserve vulnerable species and ecosystems. In this study we use tracking data from seven large seabird species of the Southern Ocean (Black-browed Albatross Thalassarche melanophris, Grey-headed Albatross T. chrysostoma, Northern Giant Petrel Macronectes halli, Southern Giant Petrel M. giganteus, Tristan Albatross Diomedea dabbenena...

Data from: Metapopulation patterns of additive and nonadditive genetic variance in the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

Bruno Guinand, Marc Vandeputte, Mathilde Dupont-Nivet, Alain Vergnet, Pierrick Haffray, Hervé Chavanne & Béatrice Chatain
Describing and explaining the geographic within-species variation in phenotypes (“phenogeography”) in the sea over a species distribution range is central to our understanding of a variety of eco-evolutionary topics. However, phenogeographic studies that have a large potential to investigate adaptive variation are overcome by phylogeographic studies, still mainly focusing on neutral markers. How genotypic and phenotypic data could covary over large geographic scales remains poorly understood in marine species. We crossed 75 noninbred sires (five...

Data from: Boldness predicts an individual's position along an exploration-exploitation foraging trade-off

Samantha C. Patrick, David Pinaud & Henri Weimerskirch
Individuals do not have complete information about the environment and therefore they face a trade-off between gathering information (exploration) and gathering resources (exploitation). Studies have shown individual differences in components of this trade-off but how stable these strategies are in a population and the intrinsic drivers of these differences is not well understood. Top marine predators are expected to experience a particularly strong trade-off as many species have large foraging ranges and their prey often...

Data from: Pulsed food resources, but not forest cover, determines lifetime reproductive success in a forest-dwelling rodent

Katrine S. Hoset, Alexandre Villers, Ralf Wistbacka & Vesa Selonen
1. The relative contributions of habitat and food availability on fitness may provide evidence for key habitat features needed to safeguard population persistence. However, defining habitat quality for a species can be a complex task, especially if knowledge on the relationship between individual performance and habitat quality is lacking. 2. Here, we determined the relative importance of availability of suitable forest habitat, body mass, and food from masting tree species on female lifetime reproductive success...

Data from: A multispecies approach reveals hot-spots and cold-spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes

Abigail E. Cahill, Aurelien De Jode, Sophie Dubois, Zoheir Bouzaza, Didier Aurelle, Emilie Boissin, Olivier Chabrol, Romain David, Emilie Egea, Jean-Baptiste Ledoux, Bastien Merigot, Alexandra Anh-Thu Weber & Anne Chenuil
Genetic diversity is crucial for species’ maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed...

Data from: Defector clustering is linked to cooperation in a pathogenic bacterium

Edward W. Tekwa, Dao Nguyen, Michel Loreau & Andrew Gonzalez
Spatial clustering is thought to favour the evolution of cooperation because it puts cooperators in a position to help each other. However, clustering also increases competition. The fate of cooperation may depend on how much cooperators cluster relative to defectors, but these clustering differences have not been the focus of previous models and experiments. By competing siderophore-producing cooperator and defector strains of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in experimental microhabitats, we found that at the...

Data from: Habitat-related variation in the plasticity of a UV sensitive photoreceptor over a small spatial scale in the palmate newt

Jean Secondi, Mélissa Martin, Delphine Goven, Pascal Mège, Stéphane Sourice & Marc Théry
Plastic phenotypes are expected to be favoured in heterogeneous environments compared with stable environments. Sensory systems are interesting to test this theory because they are costly to produce and support, and strong fitness costs are expected if they are not tuned to the local environment. Consistently, the visual system of several species changes with the conditions experienced during early development. However, there is little information on whether the amplitude of the change, i.e. the reaction...

Data from: Interpreting ELISA analyses from wild animal samples: some recurrent issues and solutions

Romain Garnier, Raül Ramos, Ana Sanz-Aguilar, Maud Poisbleau, Henri Weimerskirch, Sarah Burthe, Jeremy Tornos & Thierry Boulinier
1. Many studies in disease and immunological ecology rely on the use of assays that quantify the amount of specific antibodies (immunoglobulin) in samples. Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assays (ELISAs) are increasingly used in ecology due to their availability for a broad array of antigens and the limited amount of sampling material they require. Two recurrent methodological issues are nevertheless faced by researchers: (i) the limited availability of immunological assays and reagents developed for non-model species,...

Data from: Scale dependence of the diversity–stability relationship in a temperate grassland

Yunhai Zhang, Nianpeng He, Michel Loreau, Qingmin Pan & Xingguo Han
1. A positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem stability has been reported in many ecosystems; however, it has yet to be determined whether and how spatial scale affects this relationship. Here, for the first time, we assessed the effects of alpha, beta and gamma diversity on ecosystem stability and the scale dependence of the slope of the diversity–stability relationship. 2. By employing a long-term (33 years) dataset from a temperate grassland, northern China, we calculated...

Data from: Aging parasites produce offspring with poor fitness prospects

Cédric Lippens, Bruno Faivre, Clothilde Lechenault & Gabriele Sorci
Senescing individuals have poor survival prospects and low fecundity. They can also produce offspring with reduced survival and reproductive success. We tested the effect of parental age on the performance of descendants in the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus, an intestinal parasite of rodents. We found that offspring of senescing worms had reduced within-host survival and reduced egg shedding over the first month post-infection compared with offspring produced by young parents. These results suggest that declining offspring...

Data from: Parallel evolution of behaviour during independent host-shifts following maize introduction into Asia and Europe

Vincent Calcagno, Clémentine Mitoyen, Philippe Audiot, Sergine Ponsard, Giu-Zhen Gao, Zhao-Zhi Lu, Zhen-Ying Wang, Kang-Lai He, Denis Bourguet & Gui-Zhen Gao
Maize was introduced into opposite sides of Eurasia 500 years ago, in Western Europe and in Asia. This caused two host-shifts in the phytophagous genus Ostrinia, O. nubilalis (the European corn borer; ECB) and O. furnacalis (the Asian corn borer; ACB) are now major pests of maize worldwide. They originated independently from Dicot-feeding ancestors, similar to O. scapulalis (the Adzuki bean borer; ABB). Unlike other host-plants, maize is yearly harvested, and harvesting practices impose severe...

Data from: Spontaneous nongenetic variation of group size creates cheater-free groups of social microbes

Michaela Amherd, Gregory J. Velicer & Olaya Rendueles
In social organisms, cheaters that gain a fitness advantage by defecting from the costs of cooperation reduce the average level of cooperation in a population. Such “cheating load” can be severe enough to cause local extinction events when cooperation is necessary for survival, but can also mediate group-level selection against cheaters across spatially structured groups that vary in cheater frequency. In cheater-laden populations, such variation could be generated by the formation of new homogeneous groups...

Data from: A nonrandom subset of olfactory genes is associated with host preference in the fruit fly Drosophila orena

Aaron A. Comeault, Antonio Serrato-Capuchina, David A. Turissini, Patrick J. McLaughlin, Jean R. David & Daniel R. Matute
Specialization onto different host plants has been hypothesized to be a major driver of diversification in insects, and traits controlling olfaction have been shown to play a fundamental role in host preferences. A diverse set of olfactory genes control olfactory traits in insects, and it remains unclear whether specialization onto different hosts is likely to involve a nonrandom subset of these genes. Here, we test the role of olfactory genes in a novel case of...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    55

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    55

Affiliations

  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    55
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    8
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    5
  • Paul Sabatier University
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology
    2
  • University of Lyon System
    2
  • Macquarie University
    2
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    2
  • University of Barcelona
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Institute of Marine Science
    2
  • Aix-Marseille University
    2
  • Institut Pasteur
    2