4 Works

Data from: Effective population sizes of a major vector of human diseases, Aedes aegypti

Norah P. Saarman, Andrea Gloria-Soria, Eric C. Anderson, Benjamin R. Evans, Evlyn Pless, Luciano V. Cosme, Cassandra Gonzalez-Acosta, Basile Kamgang, Dawn M. Wesson & Jeffrey R. Powell
The effective population size (Ne) is a fundamental parameter in population genetics that determines the relative strength of selection and random genetic drift, the effect of migration, levels of inbreeding, and linkage disequilibrium. In many cases where it has been estimated in animals, Ne is on the order of 10-20% of the census size. In this study, we use 12 microsatellite markers and 14,888 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to empirically estimate Ne in Aedes aegypti,...

Data from: Natal and breeding philopatry of female Steller sea lions in southeastern Alaska

Kelly K. Hastings, Lauri A. Jemison, Grey W. Pendleton, Kimberly L. Raum-Suryan & Kenneth W. Pitcher
Information on drivers of dispersal is critical for wildlife conservation but is rare for long-lived marine mammal species with large geographic ranges. We fit multi-state mark-recapture models to resighting data of 369 known-aged Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) females marked as pups on their natal rookeries in southeastern Alaska from 1994-2005 and monitored from 2001-15. We estimated probabilities of females being first observed parous at their natal site (natal philopatry), and of not moving breeding...

Data from: Evidence for interannual variation in genetic structure of Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) along the California Current System

Tyler M. Jackson, G. Curtis Roegner & Kathleen G. O'Malley
Using a combination of population- and individual-based analytical approaches, we provide a comprehensive examination of genetic connectivity of Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) along ~1,200 km of the California Current System (CCS). We sampled individuals at 33 sites in 2012 to establish a baseline of genetic diversity and hierarchal population genetic structure, and then assessed inter-annual variability in our estimates by sampling again in 2014. Genetic diversity showed little variation among sites or across years. In...

Data from: The importance of standardization for biodiversity comparisons: a case study using Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) and metabarcoding to measure cryptic diversity on Mo'orea coral reefs, French Polynesia

Emma Ransome, Jonathan B. Geller, Molly Timmers, Matthieu Leray, Angka Mahardini, Andrianus Sembiring, Allen G. Collins & Christopher P. Meyer
The advancement of metabarcoding techniques, declining costs of high-throughput sequencing and development of systematic sampling devices, such as autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS), have provided the means to gather a vast amount of diversity data from cryptic marine communities. However, such increased capability could also lead to analytical challenges if the methods used to examine these communities across local and global scales are not standardized. Here we compare and assess the underlying biases of four...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    4
  • Alaska Department of Fish and Game
    2
  • National Museum
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    1
  • Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    1
  • Udayana University
    1
  • Yale University
    1
  • Tulane University
    1