258 Works

unearthing edges : constructing gaps

Ailey Picasso
This project was completed for the Master of Fine Arts in Dance degree at the University of Iowa.
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Abnormal Development of Cerebellar-Striatal Circuitry in Huntington’s Disease: Supplemental Figures

Jordan Schultz, Alexander Tereshchenko, Joel Bruss, Vincent Magnotta, Eric Epping & Peg Nopoulos
Objective: To test the hypothesis that the trajectory of functional connections over time of the striatum and the cerebellum differs between pre-symptomatic patients with the HD gene expansion (GE) and patients with a family history of HD but without the gene-expansion (GNE), we evaluated function MRI data from the Kids-HD study. Methods: We utilized resting-state, functional MRI data from participants in the Kids-HD study between 6 to 18 years old. Participants were divided into the...
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10 Close

Christine Augspurger & Taylor Ambrosio Wood
Transience: The Music of Taylor Ambrosio Wood. Track Ten. This project was completed for the Doctor of Music Arts degree at the University of Iowa School of Music.
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21 Water Melody

Tieyi Zhang & Shengxi Lin
This project was completed for the Doctor of Music Arts degree at the University of Iowa School of Music.
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Data from: The evolutionary relationships and age of Homo naledi: an assessment using dated Bayesian phylogenetic methods

Mana Dembo, Davorka Radovčić, Heather M. Garvin, Myra F. Laird, Lauren Schroeder, Jill E. Scott, Juliet Brophy, Rebecca R. Ackermann, Charles M. Musiba, Darryl J. De Ruiter, Arne Ø. Mooers, Mark Collard & Chares M. Musiba
Homo naledi is a recently discovered species of fossil hominin from South Africa. A considerable amount is already known about H. naledi but some important questions remain unanswered. Here we report a study that addressed two of them: “Where does H. naledi fit in the hominin evolutionary tree?” and “How old is it?” We used a large supermatrix of craniodental characters for both early and late hominin species and Bayesian phylogenetic techniques to carry out...
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Data from: No enhancement of 24-hour visuomotor skill retention by post-practice caffeine administration

Sara J. Hussain & Kelly J. Cole
Caffeine is widely consumed throughout the world and appears to indirectly facilitate learning and memory through effects on attention and motivation. Animal work indicates that post-training caffeine administration augments inhibitory avoidance memory, spatial memory, and object memory. In humans, post-training caffeine administration enhances the ability to discern between familiar images and new, similar images. However, the effect of post-training caffeine administration on motor memory has not been examined. Therefore, we tested two groups of low...
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Data from: Heterogeneity in genetic diversity among non-coding loci fails to fit neutral coalescent models of population history

Jeffrey L. Peters, Trina E. Robert, Kevin Winker, Kevin G. McCracken & Trina E. Roberts
Inferring aspects of the population histories of species using coalescent analyses of non-coding nuclear DNA has grown in popularity. These inferences, such as divergence, gene flow, and changes in population size, assume that genetic data reflect simple population histories and neutral evolutionary processes. However, violating model assumptions can result in a poor fit between empirical data and the models. We sampled 22 nuclear intron sequences from at least 19 different chromosomes (a genomic transect) to...
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Data from: Are there age-related differences in the ability to learn configural responses?

Rachel Clark, Michael Freedberg, Eliot Hazeltine & Michelle W. Voss
Age is often associated with a decline in cognitive abilities that are important for maintaining functional independence, such as learning new skills. Many forms of motor learning appear to be relatively well preserved with age, while learning tasks that involve associative binding tend to be negatively affected. The current study aimed to determine whether age differences exist on a configural response learning task, which includes aspects of motor learning and associative binding. Young (M =...
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Data from: Penalized Multi-Marker versus Single-Marker Regression methods for genome-wide association studies of quantitative traits

Hui Yi, Patrick Breheny, Netsanet Iman, Yongmei Liu, Ina Hoeschele, H. Yi, N. Imam, I. Hoeschele & P. Breheny
The data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in humans are still predominantly analyzed using single marker association methods. As an alternative to Single Marker Analysis (SMA), all or subsets of markers can be tested simultaneously. This approach requires a form of Penalized Regression (PR) as the number of SNPs is much larger than the sample size. Here we review PR methods in the context of GWAS, extend them to perform penalty parameter and SNP selection...
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Data from: What’s in an outgroup? The impact of outgroup choice on the phylogenetic position of Thalattosuchia (Crocodylomorpha) and the origin of Crocodyliformes

Eric W. Wilberg
Outgroup sampling is a central issue in phylogenetic analysis. However, good justification is rarely given for outgroup selection in published analyses. Recent advances in our understanding of archosaur phylogeny suggest that many previous studies of crocodylomorph and crocodyliform relationships have rooted trees on outgroup taxa that are only very distantly related to the ingroup (e.g., Gracilisuchus stipanicicorum), or might actually belong within the ingroup. Thalattosuchia, a group of Mesozoic marine crocodylomorphs, has a controversial phylogenetic...
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Data from: Sequential adaptive introgression of the mitochondrial genome in Drosophila yakuba and D. santomea

Ana Llopart, Danielle Herrig, Evgeny Brud & Zachary Stecklein
Interspecific hybridization provides the unique opportunity for species to tap into genetic variation present in a closely related species and potentially take advantage of beneficial alleles. It has become increasingly clear that when hybridization occurs, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) often crosses species boundaries, raising the possibility that it could serve as a recurrent target of natural selection and source of species’ adaptations. Here we report the sequences of 46 complete mitochondrial genomes of Drosophila yakuba and...
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Data from: Recalibrating timing behavior via expected covariance between temporal cues

Benjamin J. De Corte, Rebecca R. Della Valle, Matthew S. Matell, Rebecca R Della Valle, Matthew S Matell & Benjamin J De Corte
Individuals must predict future events to proactively guide their behavior. Predicting when events will occur is a critical component of these expectations. Temporal expectations are often generated based on individual cue-duration relationships. However, the durations associated with different environmental cues will often co-vary due to a common cause. We show that timing behavior may be calibrated based on this expected covariance, which we refer to as the 'common cause hypothesis'. In five experiments using rats,...
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Data from: PCB126 inhibits the activation of AMPK-CREB signal transduction required for energy sensing in liver

Gopi S. Gadupudi, Benjamin A. Elser, Fabian A. Sandgruber, Xueshu Li, Katherine N. Gibson-Corley, Larry W. Robertson, Katherine N Gibson-Corley, Gopi S Gadupudi, Benjamin A Elser & Larry W Robertson
3,3’,4,4’,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126), a dioxin-like PCB, elicits toxicity through a wide array of non-carcinogenic effects, including metabolic syndrome, wasting, and non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD). Previously, we reported decreases in the transcription of several enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, before the early onset of lipid accumulation. Hence, this study was aimed at understanding the impact of resultant decreases gluconeogenic enzymes on growth, weight and metabolism in the liver, upon extended exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (75-100 g), fed a...
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Data from: Higher rate of tissue regeneration in polyploid asexual vs. diploid sexual freshwater snails

Nicole R. Krois, Anvesh Cherukuri, Nikhil Puttagunta, Maurine Neiman, A. Cherukuri, N. R. Krois, M. Neiman & N. Puttagunta
Characterizing phenotypic differences between sexual and asexual organisms is a critical step towards understanding why sexual reproduction is so common. Because asexuals are often polyploid, understanding how ploidy influences phenotype is directly relevant to the study of sex and will provide key insights into the evolution of ploidy-level variation. The well-established association between genome size and cell cycle duration, evidence for a link between genome size and tissue regeneration rate and the growing body of...
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Data from: Male offspring production by asexual Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand snail

Maurine Neiman, Katelyn Larkin, Andrew R. Thompson, Peter Wilton, M Neiman, K Larkin, A R Thompson & P Wilton
As only females contribute directly to population growth, sexual females investing equally in sons and daughters experience a two-fold cost relative to asexuals producing only daughters. Typically, researchers have focused on benefits of sex that can counter this ‘cost of males’ and thus explain its predominance. Here, we instead ask whether asexuals might also pay a cost of males by quantifying the rate of son production in 45 experimental populations (‘lineages’) founded by obligately asexual...
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Data from: Camponotus floridanus ants incur a trade-off between phenotypic development and pathogen susceptibility from their mutualistic Endosymbiont Blochmannia

Veronica M. Sinotte, Samantha N. Freedman, Line V. Ugelvig, Marc A. Seid, Line Ugelvig, Samantha Freedman, Veronica Sinotte & Marc Seid
Various insects engage in microbial mutualisms in which the reciprocal benefits exceed the costs. Ants of the genus Camponotus benefit from nutrient supplementation by their mutualistic endosymbiotic bacteria, Blochmannia, but suffer a cost in tolerating and regulating the symbiont. This cost suggests that the ants face secondary consequences such as susceptibility to pathogenic infection and transmission. In order to elucidate the symbiont’s effects on development and disease defence, Blochmannia floridanus was reduced in colonies of...
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Data from: Corollary discharge in precerebellar nuclei of sleeping infant rats

Didhiti Mukherjee, Greta Sokoloff, Mark S. Blumberg & Mark S Blumberg
In week-old rats, somatosensory input arises predominantly from external stimuli or from sensory feedback (reafference) associated with myoclonic twitches during active sleep. A previous study suggested that the brainstem motor structures that produce twitches also send motor copies (or corollary discharge, CD) to the cerebellum. We tested this possibility by recording from two precerebellar nuclei—the inferior olive (IO) and lateral reticular nucleus (LRN). In most IO and LRN neurons, twitch-related activity peaked sharply around twitch...
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Data from: Sex in the wild: how and why field-based studies contribute to solving the problem of sex

Maurine Neiman, Patrick Gerardus Meirmans, Tanja Schwander, Stephanie Meirmans & Patrick G. Meirmans
Why and how sexual reproduction is maintained in natural populations, the so-called “queen of problems”, is a key unanswered question in evolutionary biology. Recent efforts to solve the problem of sex have often emphasized results generated from laboratory settings. Here, we use a survey of representative “sex in the wild” literature to review and synthesize the outcomes of empirical studies focused on natural populations. Especially notable results included relatively strong support for mechanisms involving niche...
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Data from: Tales from the crypt: a parasitoid manipulates the behaviour of its parasite host

Kelly L. Weinersmith, Sean M. Liu, Andrew A. Forbes & Scott P. Egan
There are many examples of apparent manipulation of host phenotype by parasites, yet few examples of hypermanipulation—where a phenotype-manipulating parasite is itself manipulated by a parasite. Moreover, few studies confirm manipulation is occurring by quantifying whether the host's changed phenotype increases parasite fitness. Here we describe a novel case of hypermanipulation, in which the crypt gall wasp Bassettia pallida (a phenotypic manipulator of its tree host) is manipulated by the parasitoid crypt-keeper wasp Euderus set,...
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Data from: Meek mothers with powerful daughters: effects of novel host environments and small trait differences on parasitoid competition

Gabriela Hamerlinck, Nathan P. Lemoine, Glen R. Hood, Karen C. Abbott & Andrew A. Forbes
Outcomes of competition may depend both on subtle differences in traits relevant to fitness and on how those traits are expressed in the context of the environment. Environmental effects on traits impacting population dynamics are often overlooked in studies of parasitic wasp (parasitoid) competition. Lineages of the parasitoid Diachasma alloeum (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) differ in relative ovipositor length (a trait affecting the proportion of hosts available for parasitism). Since the size of natal hosts affects the...
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Data from: Niche differentiation and colonization of a novel environment by an asexual parasitic wasp.

Andrew A. Forbes, Laura A. Rice, Nicholas B. Stewart, Wee L. Yee, Maurine Neiman, A. A. Forbes, L. A. Rice, N. B. Stewart, M. Neiman & W. L. Yee
How do asexual taxa become adapted to a diversity of environments, and how do they persist despite changing environmental conditions? These questions are linked by their mutual focus on the relationship between genetic variation, which is often limited in asexuals, and the ability to respond to environmental variation. Asexual taxa originating from a single ancestor present a unique opportunity to assess rates of phenotypic and genetic change when access to new genetic variation is limited...
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Data from: Anatomy of a cline: dissecting anti-predatory adaptations in a marine gastropod along the U.S. Atlantic coast

Mary E. Kosloski, Gregory P. Dietl & John C. Handley
The scope of anti-predatory adaptation is expected to be greater in warm than in cold environments. High temperatures lower the costs associated with the production and maintenance of energetically expensive traits and enable ecological interactions to intensify. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the expression of anti-predatory morphology within a marine gastropod species (the knobbed whelk, Busycon carica) over a large (>1,400 km) geographic area that spans more than 10°C annual temperature variation. We also...
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Data from: Genetic differentiation associated with host plants and geography among six widespread species of South American Blepharoneura fruit flies (Tephritidae)

Kristina Ottens, Isaac S. Winkler, Matthew L. Lewis, Sonja J. Scheffer, Gessica A. Gomes-Costa, Marty A. Condon, Andrew A. Forbes, G. A. Gomes-Costa, K. Ottens, A. A. Forbes, M. L. Lewis & S. J. Scheffer
Tropical herbivorous insects are astonishingly diverse and many are highly host-specific. Much evidence suggests that herbivorous insect diversity is a function of host-plant diversity; yet, the diversity of some lineages exceeds the diversity of plants. Although most species of herbivorous fruit flies in the Neotropical genus Blepharoneura are strongly host-specific (they deposit their eggs in a single host plant species and flower sex), some species are collected from multiple hosts or flowers and these may...
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Data from: Divergence before the host shift? Prezygotic reproductive isolation among three varieties of a specialist fly on a single host plant

Alaine C. Hippee, Maren E. Elnes, Jarod S. Armenta, Marty A. Condon & Andrew A. Forbes
1. Although divergence via host-plant shifting is a common theme in the speciation of some phytophagous insects, it is not clear whether host shifts are typically initiators of speciation or if they instead contribute to divergence events already in progress. While host shifts appear to be generally associated with speciation events for flies in the genus Strauzia, three sympatric varieties of the sunflower fly [Strauzia longipennis (Wiedemann)] co-occur on the same host plant in the...
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Data from: Effects of polyploidy and reproductive mode on life history trait expression

Katelyn Larkin, Claire Tucci & Maurine Neiman
Ploidy elevation is increasingly recognized as a common and important source of genomic variation. Even so, the consequences and biological significance of polyploidy remain unclear, especially in animals. Here, our goal was to identify potential life history costs and benefits of polyploidy by conducting a large multiyear common garden experiment in Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand freshwater snail that is a model system for the study of ploidy variation, sexual reproduction, host–parasite coevolution, and invasion...
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Registration Year

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    1
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    2
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    4
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    3
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    5
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    5
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    5
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    157
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    76

Resource Types

  • Sound
    194
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    52
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    7
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    4
  • Other
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Iowa
    258
  • University of Notre Dame
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • University of Cape Town
    2
  • Emporia State University
    2
  • Notre Dame University
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • Rice University
    1
  • Oregon Health & Science University
    1
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    1
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    1
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    1
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    1
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    1