149 Works

Data from: Feline immunodeficiency virus in puma: estimation of force of infection reveals insights into transmission

Jennifer Reynolds, Scott Carver, Mark Cunningham, Ken Logan, Winston Vickers, Kevin Crooks, Sue VandeWoude & Meggan Craft
Determining parameters that govern pathogen transmission (such as the force of infection, FOI), and pathogen impacts on morbidity and mortality, is exceptionally challenging for wildlife. Vital parameters can vary, for example across host populations, between sexes and within an individual's lifetime. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus affecting domestic and wild cat species, forming species-specific viral--host associations. FIV infection is common in populations of puma (Puma concolor), yet uncertainty remains over transmission parameters and...

Data from: Aridity Drives Spatiotemporal Patterns of Masting Across the Latitudinal Range of a Dryland Conifer

Andreas Wion, Peter Weisberg, Ian Pearse & Miranda Redmond
Masting, or the synchronous and irregular production of seed crops, is controlled by environmental cues and resource budgets. Increasing temperatures and shifting precipitation regimes may alter the frequency and magnitude of masting, especially in species that experience chronic resource stress. Yet the effects of a changing climate on seed production are unlikely to be uniform across populations, particularly those that span broad abiotic gradients. In this study, we assessed the spatiotemporal patterns of masting across...

Data from: Community-based wildlife management area supports similar mammal species richness and densities compared to a national park

Christian Kiffner, Seth Thomas, Talia Speaker, Victoria O’Connor, Paige Schwarz, John Kioko & Bernard Kissui
Community-based conservation models have been widely implemented across Africa to improve wildlife conservation and livelihoods of rural communities. In Tanzania, communities can set aside land and formally register it as Wildlife Management Area (WMA), which allows them to generate revenue via consumptive or non-consumptive utilization of wildlife. The key, yet often untested, assumption of this model is that economic benefits accrued from wildlife motivate sustainable management of wildlife. To test the ecological effectiveness (here defined...

Data from: Modeling multilocus selection in an individual-based, spatially-explicit landscape genetics framework

Erin Landguth, Erin Landguth, Brenna R. Forester, Andrew J. Eckert, Andrew J. Shirk, Mitra Menon, Amy Whipple, Casey C. Day & Samuel A. Cushman
We implemented multilocus selection in a spatially-explicit, individual-based framework that enables multivariate environmental gradients to drive selection in many loci as a new module for the landscape genetics programs, CDPOP and CDMetaPOP. Our module simulates multilocus selection using a linear additive model, providing a flexible platform to evaluate a wide range of genotype-environment associations. Importantly, the module allows simulation of selection in any number of loci under the influence of any number of environmental variables....

Mass ratio effects underlie ecosystem responses to environmental change

Melinda Smith, Sally Koerner, Alan Knapp, Meghan Avolio, Francis Chaves, Elsie Denton, John Dietrich, David Gibson, Jesse Gray, Ava Hoffman, David Hoover, Kimberly Komatsu, Andrea Silletti, Kevin Wilcox, Qiang Yu & John Blair
1. Random species loss has been shown experimentally to reduce ecosystem function, sometimes more than other anthropogenic environmental changes. Yet, controversy surrounds the importance of this finding for natural systems where species loss is non-random. 2. We compiled data from 16 multi-year experiments located at a single site in native tallgrass prairie. These experiments included responses to 11 anthropogenic environmental changes, as well as non-random biodiversity loss - either the removal of uncommon/rare plant species...

Mass ratio effects underlie ecosystem responses to environmental change

Melinda Smith, Sarah Koerner, Alan K. Knapp, Meghan Avolio, Francis Chaves, Elsie Denton, John Dietrich, David Gibson, Jesse Gray, Ava Hoffman, David Hoover, Kimberly La Pierre, Andrea Silletti, Kevin Wilcox, Qiang Yu & John Blair
1. Random species loss has been shown experimentally to reduce ecosystem function, sometimes more than other anthropogenic environmental changes. Yet, controversy surrounds the importance of this finding for natural systems where species loss is non-random. 2. We compiled data from 16 multi-year experiments located at a single site in native tallgrass prairie. These experiments included responses to 11 anthropogenic environmental changes, as well as non-random biodiversity loss - either the removal of uncommon/rare plant species...

Vertebrate and invertebrate herbivory data

Melinda Smith & David Gibson
Data are from a factorial experiment designed to test the effects of small mammals and above- and below-ground invertebrates on plant species richness and composition in native tallgrass prairie (Gibson et al. 1990, https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00318268).

Data from: Mass ratio effects underlie ecosystem responses to environmental change

Melinda Smith & Andrea Silletti
1. Random species loss has been shown experimentally to reduce ecosystem function, sometimes more than other anthropogenic environmental changes. Yet, controversy surrounds the importance of this finding for natural systems where species loss is non-random. 2. We compiled data from 16 multi-year experiments located at a single site in native tallgrass prairie. These experiments included responses to 11 anthropogenic environmental changes, as well as non-random biodiversity loss - either the removal of uncommon/rare plant species...

Data from: Vocal characteristics of prairie dog alarm calls across an urban noise gradient

Graeme Shannon, Megan F. McKenna, Grete Wilson-Henjum, Lisa M. Angeloni, Kevin R. Crooks & George Wittemyer
Increasing anthropogenic noise is having a global impact on wildlife, particularly due to the masking of crucial acoustical communication. However, there have been few studies examining the impacts of noise exposure on communication in free-ranging terrestrial mammals. We studied alarm calls of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) across an urban gradient to explore vocal adjustment relative to different levels of noise exposure. There was no change in the frequency 5%, peak frequency or duration of...

Persistence of an endangered native duck, feral mallards, and multiple hybrid swarms across the main Hawaiian Islands

Caitlin Wells, Philip Lavretsky, Michael Sorenson, Jeffrey Peters, Jeffrey DaCosta, Stephen Turnbull, Kimberly Uyehara, Christopher Malachowski, Bruce Dugger, John Eadie & Andrew Engilis
Interspecific hybridization is recognized as an important process in the evolutionary dynamics of both speciation and the reversal of speciation. However, our understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of hybridization that erode versus promote species boundaries is incomplete. The endangered, endemic koloa maoli (or Hawaiian duck, Anas wyvilliana) is thought to be threatened with genetic extinction through ongoing hybridization with an introduced congener, the feral mallard (A. platyrhynchos). We investigated spatial and temporal variation...

Urbanization reduces genetic connectivity in bobcats (Lynx rufus) at both intra- and inter-population spatial scales

Christopher P Kozakiewicz, Christopher Burridge, W. Chris Funk, Patricia E Salerno, Daryl R Trumbo, Roderick B Gagne, Erin E Boydston, Robert N Fisher, Lisa M Lyren, Megan K Jennings, Seth P D Riley, Laurel E K Serieys, Sue VandeWoude, Kevin R Crooks & Scott Carver
Urbanization is a major factor driving habitat fragmentation and connectivity loss in wildlife. However, the impacts of urbanization on connectivity can vary among species and even populations due to differences in local landscape characteristics, and our ability to detect these relationships may depend on the spatial scale at which they are measured. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are relatively sensitive to urbanization and the status of bobcat populations is an important indicator of connectivity in urban coastal...

Urbanization impacts apex predator gene flow but not genetic diversity across an urban-rural divide

Daryl R Trumbo, Patricia E Salerno, Kenneth Logan, Mat Alldredge, Roderick B Gagne, Christopher P Kozakiewicz, Simona Kraberger, Nick Fountain-Jones, Meggan E Craft, Scott Carver, Holly B Ernest, Kevin Crooks, Sue VandeWoude & W. Chris Funk
Apex predators are important indicators of intact natural ecosystems. They are also sensitive to urbanization because they require broad home ranges and extensive contiguous habitat to support their prey base. Pumas (Puma concolor) can persist near human developed areas, but urbanization may be detrimental to their movement ecology, population structure, and genetic diversity. To investigate potential effects of urbanization in population connectivity of pumas, we performed a landscape genomics study of 130 pumas on the...

Pojected temperature rise for 2040, 2060, 2080 and 2100, considering NOAA's climate model

Hussam Mahmoud
The data provided is the projected temperature rise for 2040, 2060, 2080 and 2100, considering the climate model from the NOAA’s (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration) Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory GFDL-CM3 under three Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, which are named for the approximate radiative forcing in year 2100: the lower forcing scenario RCP 2.6, a moderate scenario RCP 6.0 and the higher forcing scenario RCP 8.5

Data from: The importance of functional responses among competing predators for avian nesting success

Kristen Ellis, Randy Larsen & Dave Koons
1. The relationship between the rate of predation and prey abundance is an important component of predator-prey dynamics. However, functional responses are less straightforward when multiple predators compete for shared prey. Interactions among competing predators can reduce or enhance effects of predation on prey populations. Because many avian populations experience high rates of nest predation, understanding the role of specific predators on nest mortality will lead to more informed conservation and management strategies which attempt...

Data from: Genomic pedigree reconstruction identifies predictors of mating and reproductive success in an invasive vertebrate

Brenna A Levine, Marlis R Douglas, Amy A Yackel Adams, Bjorn Lardner, Robert N Reed, Julie A Savidge & Michael E Douglas
The persistence of an invasive species is influenced by its reproductive ecology, and a successful control program must operate on this premise. However, the reproductive ecology of invasive species may be enigmatic due to factors that also limit their management, such as cryptic coloration and behavior. We explored the mating and reproductive ecology of the invasive Brown Treesnake (BTS: Boiga irregularis) by reconstructing a multigenerational genomic pedigree based on 654 single nucleotide polymorphisms for a...

Data from: Prolonged exposure to manure from livestock administered antibiotics decreases ecosystem carbon-use efficiency and alters nitrogen cycling

Carl Wepking, Brian Badgley, Jeb Barrett, Katharine Knowlton, Jane Lucas, Kevan Minick, Partha Ray, Sarah Shawver & Michael Strickland
Microbial communities drive soil ecosystem function but are also susceptible to environmental disturbances. We investigated whether exposure to manure sourced from cattle either administered or not administered antibiotics affected microbially-mediated terrestrial ecosystem function. We quantified changes in microbial community composition via amplicon sequencing, and terrestrial elemental cycling via a stable isotope pulse-chase. Exposure to manure from antibiotic-treated cattle caused: i) changes in microbial community structure; and ii) alterations in elemental cycling throughout the terrestrial system....

Data from: Extreme site fidelity as an optimal strategy in an unpredictable and homogeneous environment

Brian D. Gerber, Mevin B. Hooten, Christopher P. Peck, Mindy B. Rice, James H. Gammonley, Anthony D. Apa & Amy J. Davis
1. Animal site fidelity structures space-use, population demography, and ultimately gene flow. Understanding the adaptive selection for site fidelity patterns provides a mechanistic understanding to both spatial and population processes. This can be achieved by linking space-use with environmental variability (spatial and temporal) and demographic parameters. However, rarely is the environmental context that drives the selection for site fidelity behavior fully considered. 2. We use ecological theory to understand whether the spatial and temporal variability...

Data from: Variation in population structure and dynamics of montane forest tree species in Ethiopia guide priorities for conservation and research

Nicholas E. Young, William H. Romme, Paul H. Evangelista, Tefera Mengistu & Asrat Worede
The greatest extent of Afromontane environments in the world is found in Ethiopia. These areas support exceptional biodiversity, but forest cover and ecological integrity have declined sharply in recent decades. Conservation and management efforts are hampered in part by an inadequate understanding of the basic ecology of major tree species. We investigated population structure and inferred population dynamics from size frequency distributions of 22 forest tree species encountered in montane forests of Ethiopia. We collected...

Data from: Host-pathogen metapopulation dynamics suggest high elevation refugia for boreal toads

Brittany A. Mosher, Larissa L. Bailey, Erin Muths & Kathryn P. Huyvaert
Emerging infectious diseases are an increasingly common threat to wildlife. Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is an emerging infectious disease that has been linked to amphibian declines around the world. Few studies exist that explore amphibian-Bd dynamics at the landscape scale, limiting our ability to identify which factors are associated with variation in population susceptibility and to develop effective in situ disease management. Declines of boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas boreas) in...

Data from: Miocene dispersal drives island radiations in the palm tribe Trachycarpeae (Arecaceae)

Christine D. Bacon, William J. Baker & Mark P. Simmons
The study of three island groups of the palm tribe Trachycarpeae (Arecaceae/Palmae) permits both the analysis of each independent radiation and comparisons across the tribe to address general processes that drive island diversification. Phylogenetic relationships of Trachycarpeae were inferred from three plastid and three low-copy nuclear genes. The incongruent topological position of Brahea in CISP5 was hypothesized to be caused by duplication event and was addressed using uninode coding. The resulting phylogenetic trees were well-resolved...

Data from: Identification of migratory bird flyways in North America using community detection on biological networks

Michael G. Buhnerkempe, Colleen T. Webb, Andrew A. Merton, John E. Buhnerkempe, Geof H. Givens, Ryan S. Miller & Jennifer A. Hoeting
Migratory behavior of waterfowl populations in North America has traditionally been broadly characterized by four north-south flyways, and these flyways have been central to the management of waterfowl populations for more than 80 years. However, previous flyway characterizations are not easily updated with current bird movement data and fail to provide assessments of the importance of specific geographical regions to the identification of flyways. Here, we developed a network model of migratory movement for four...

Data from: Modeling and mapping the probability of occurrence of invasive wild pigs across the contiguous United States

Meredith L. McClure, Christopher L. Burdett, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Mark W. Lutman, David M. Theobald, Philip D. Riggs, Daniel A. Grear & Ryan S. Miller
Wild pigs (Sus scrofa), also known as wild swine, feral pigs, or feral hogs, are one of the most widespread and successful invasive species around the world. Wild pigs have been linked to extensive and costly agricultural damage and present a serious threat to plant and animal communities due to their rooting behavior and omnivorous diet. We modeled the current distribution of wild pigs in the United States to better understand the physiological and ecological...

Data from: Mating system and environmental variation drive patterns of adaptation in Boechera spatifolia (Brassicaceae)

Kelsi A. Grogan, Timothy F. Sharbel, John K. McKay, John T. Lovell & Kelsi Grogan
Determining the relative contribution of population genetic processes to the distribution of natural variation is a major goal of evolutionary biology. Here, we take advantage of variation in mating system to test the hypothesis that local adaptation is constrained by asexual reproduction. We explored patterns of variation in ecological traits and genome-wide molecular markers in Boechera spatifolia (Brassicaceae), a species that contains both apomictic (asexual) and sexual individuals. Using a combination of quantitative genetics, neutral...

Data from: A hybrid phylogenetic–phylogenomic approach for species tree estimation in African Agama lizards with applications to biogeography, character evolution, and diversification

Adam D. Leaché, Philipp Wagner, Charles W. Linkem, Wolfgang Böhme, Theodore J. Papenfuss, Rebecca A. Chong, Brian R. Lavin, Aaron M. Bauer, Stuart V. Nielsen, Eli Greenbaum, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Andreas Schmitz, Matthew LeBreton, Ivan Ineich, Laurent Chirio, Caleb Ofori-Boateng, Edem A. Eniang, Sherif Baha El Din, Alan R. Lemmon & Frank T. Burbrink
Africa is renowned for its biodiversity and endemicity, yet little is known about the factors shaping them across the continent. African Agama lizards (45 species) have a pan-continental distribution, making them an ideal model for investigating biogeography. Many species have evolved conspicuous sexually dimorphic traits, including extravagant breeding coloration in adult males, large adult male body sizes, and variability in social systems among colorful versus drab species. We present a comprehensive time-calibrated species tree for...

Data from: Current approaches using genetic distances produce poor estimates of landscape resistance to interindividual dispersal

Tabitha A. Graves, Paul Beier, Jeffrey Andrew Royle & J. Andrew Royle
Landscape resistance reflects how difficult it is for genes to move across an area with particular attributes (e.g., land cover, slope). An increasingly popular approach to estimate resistance uses Mantel and partial Mantel tests or causal modeling to relate observed genetic distances to effective distances under alternative sets of resistance parameters. Relatively few alternative sets of resistance parameters are tested, leading to relatively poor coverage of the parameter space. Although this approach does not explicitly...

Registration Year

  • 2010
    1
  • 2011
    2
  • 2012
    5
  • 2013
    11
  • 2014
    9
  • 2015
    12
  • 2016
    25
  • 2017
    39
  • 2018
    27
  • 2019
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    149

Affiliations

  • Colorado State University
    149
  • University of Wyoming
    11
  • University of California System
    10
  • University of Minnesota
    7
  • University of Tasmania
    7
  • National Park Service
    6
  • McGill University
    5
  • University of Montana
    4
  • University of Alberta
    4
  • University of Nevada Reno
    4
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    4
  • Northern Arizona University
    4
  • Colorado Parks and Wildlife
    4
  • United States Geological Survey
    4
  • Yale University
    4