380 Works

Data from: Naked mole rats exhibit metabolic but not ventilatory plasticity following chronic sustained hypoxia

Danielle Chung, Yvonne Dzal, Allison Seow, William Milsom, Matthew Pamenter, Yvonne A. Dzal, William K. Milsom & Matthew E. Pamenter
Naked mole rats are among the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified and live in chronic hypoxia throughout their lives. The mechanisms underlying this tolerance, however, are poorly understood. Most vertebrates hyperventilate in acute hypoxia and exhibit an enhanced hyperventilation following acclimatization to chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH). Conversely, naked mole rats do not hyperventilate in acute hypoxia and their response to CSH has not been examined. In this study we explored mechanisms of plasticity in the control...

Data from: Being in a “green” building elicits “greener” recycling, but not necessarily “better” recycling

David W.-L. Wu, Alessandra DiGiacomo, Lenkic J. Peter, Wong K. Vanessa, Alan Kingstone, Peter J. Lenkic & Vanessa K. Wong
Previous observational work revealed that transient populations in a sustainable building disposed of waste more accurately when compared to patrons in a non-sustainable building. The current study uses an experimental design to replicate this observed effect and to investigate whether or not the built environment influences motivational factors to impact behavior. We find support that a building designed and built to communicate an atmosphere of sustainability can influence waste disposal behavior. Participants in the sustainable...

Data from: Do thermoregulatory costs limit altitude distributions of Andean forest birds?

Gustavo A. Londono, Mark A. Chappell, Jill E. Jankowski & Scott K. Robinson
Along tropical mountains, species often occupy narrow altitude ranges. Numerous biotic and abiotic factors have been proposed as determinants of altitude occupancy. We measured several aspects of thermal physiology of 215 bird species across a 2·6-km altitude gradient in the Peruvian Andes. We predicted that highland species would show adaptation to the colder high-altitude climate and that energy costs of thermoregulation might limit upslope dispersal of lowland natives. We found reductions in thermal conductance, body...

Data from: Intruder colour and light environment jointly determine how nesting male stickleback respond to simulated territorial intrusions

Daniel I. Bolnick, Kimberly Hendrix, Lyndon Alexander Jordan, Thor Veen & Chad D. Brock
Variation in male nuptial colour signals might be maintained by negative frequency-dependent selection. This can occur if males are more aggressive towards rivals with locally common colour phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we introduced red or melanic three-dimensional printed-model males into the territories of nesting male stickleback from two optically distinct lakes with different coloured residents. Red-throated models were attacked more in the population with red males, while melanic models were attacked more in the...

Data from: The genetics of adaptation to discrete heterogeneous environments: frequent mutation or large-effect alleles can allow range expansion

Kimberly J. Gilbert, Michael C. Whitlock, K. J. Gilbert & M. C. Whitlock
Range expansions are complex evolutionary and ecological processes. From an evolutionary standpoint, a populations' adaptive capacity can determine the success or failure of expansion. Using individual-based simulations, we model range expansion over a two-dimensional, approximately continuous landscape. We investigate the ability of populations to adapt across patchy environmental gradients and examine how the effect sizes of mutations influence the ability to adapt to novel environments during range expansion. We find that genetic architecture and landscape...

Data from: Induced defences alter the strength and direction of natural selection on reproductive traits in common milkweed

Ken A. Thompson, Kaitlin A. Cory, Marc T.J. Johnson, K. A. Thompson, K. A. Cory & M. T. J. Johnson
Evolutionary biologists have long sought to understand the ecological processes that generate plant reproductive diversity. Recent evidence indicates that constitutive antiherbivore defences can alter natural selection on reproductive traits, but it is unclear whether induced defences will have the same effect and whether reduced foliar damage in defended plants is the cause of this pattern. In a factorial field experiment using common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., we induced plant defences using jasmonic acid (JA) and...

Data from: Group elicitations yield more consistent, yet more uncertain experts in understanding risks to ecosystem services in New Zealand bays

Gerald G. Singh, Jim Sinner, Joanne Ellis, Milind Kandlikar, Benjamin S. Halpern, Terre Satterfield & Kai Chan
The elicitation of expert judgment is an important tool for assessment of risks and impacts in environmental management contexts, and especially important as decision-makers face novel challenges where prior empirical research is lacking or insufficient. Evidence-driven elicitation approaches typically involve techniques to derive more accurate probability distributions under fairly specific contexts. Experts are, however, prone to overconfidence in their judgements. Group elicitations with diverse experts can reduce expert overconfidence by allowing cross-examination and reassessment of...

Data from: Novel predators reshape holozoan phylogeny and reveal the presence of a two-component signalling system in the ancestor of animals

Elisabeth Hehenberger, Denis V. Tikhonenkov, Martin Kolisko, Javier Del Campo, Anton S. Esaulov, Alexander P. Mylnikov & Patrick J. Keeling
Our understanding of the origin of animals has been transformed by characterizing their most closely related, unicellular sisters: the choanoflagellates, filastereans, and ichthyosporeans. Together with animals, these lineages make up the Holozoa [ 1, 2 ]. Many traits previously considered “animal specific” were subsequently found in other holozoans [ 3, 4 ], showing that they evolved before animals, although exactly when is currently uncertain because several key relationships remain unresolved [ 2, 5 ]. Here...

Data from: Genetic admixture and heterosis may enhance the invasiveness of common ragweed

Min A. Hahn & Loren H. Rieseberg
Biological invasions are often associated with multiple introductions and genetic admixture of previously isolated populations. In addition to enhanced evolutionary potential through increased genetic variation, admixed genotypes may benefit from heterosis, which could contribute to their increased performance and invasiveness. To deepen our understanding of the mechanisms and management strategies for biological invasions, we experimentally studied whether intraspecific admixture causes heterosis in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) by comparing the performance of crosses (F1) between populations...

Data from: Climate change is projected to outpace rates of niche change in grasses

F. Alice Cang, Ashley A. Wilson & John J. Wiens
Climate change may soon threaten much of global biodiversity, especially if species cannot adapt to changing climatic conditions quickly enough. A critical question is how quickly climatic niches change, and if this speed is sufficient to prevent extinction as climates warm. Here, we address this question in the grass family (Poaceae). Grasses are fundamental to one of Earth's most widespread biomes (grasslands), and provide roughly half of all calories consumed by humans (including wheat, rice,...

Data from: A simple approach for maximizing the overlap of phylogenetic and comparative data

Matthew W. Pennell, Richard G. FitzJohn & William K. Cornwell
Biologists are increasingly using curated, public data sets to conduct phylogenetic comparative analyses. Unfortunately, there is often a mismatch between species for which there is phylogenetic data and those for which other data are available. As a result, researchers are commonly forced to either drop species from analyses entirely or else impute the missing data. A simple strategy to improve the overlap of phylogenetic and comparative data is to swap species in the tree that...

Data from: Time to get moving: assisted gene flow of forest trees

Sally N. Aitken & Jordan B. Bemmels
Geographic variation in trees has been investigated since the mid-18th century. Similar patterns of clinal variation have been observed along latitudinal and elevational gradients in common garden experiments for many temperate and boreal species. These studies convinced forest managers that a ‘local is best’ seed source policy was usually safest for reforestation. In recent decades, experimental design, phenotyping methods, climatic data and statistical analyses have improved greatly and refined but not radically changed knowledge of...

Data from: The conservation value of high elevation habitats to North American migrant birds

W. Alice Boyle & Kathy Martin
The basic patterns of faunal community composition and habitat associations of high elevation mountainous regions are poorly-known. This is true for the avifauna of western North America where our knowledge of high elevation use is primarily restricted to breeding assemblages. Here we report on systematic avian surveys of high elevation habitats over four years in British Columbia conducted during the post-breeding and fall migration periods (Aug–Oct). We detected a remarkable diversity of birds (95 species...

Data from: Untangling the early diversification of eukaryotes: a phylogenomic study of the evolutionary origins of Centrohelida, Haptophyta, and Cryptista

Fabien Burki, Maia Kaplan, Denis V. Tikhonekov, Vasily Zlatogursky, Bui Quang Minh, Liudmila V. Radaykina, Alexey Smirnov, Alexander P. Mylnikov, Patrick J. Keeling & Denis V. Tikhonenkov
Assembling the global eukaryotic tree of life has long been a major effort of Biology. In recent years, pushed by the new availability of genome-scale data for microbial eukaryotes, it has become possible to revisit many evolutionary enigmas. However, some of the most ancient nodes, which are essential for inferring a stable tree, have remained highly controversial. Among other reasons, the lack of adequate genomic datasets for key taxa has prevented the robust reconstruction of...

Data from: Genomics of Compositae weeds: EST libraries, microarrays, and evidence of introgression

Zhao Lai, Nolan C. Kane, Alex Kozik, Kathryn A. Hodgins, Katrina M. Dlugosch, Michael S. Barker, Marta Matvienko, Qian Yu, Kathryn G. Turner, Stephanie A. Pearl, Graeme D.M. Bell, Yi Zou, Chris Grassa, Alessia Guggisberg, Keith L. Adams, James V. Anderson, David P. Horvath, Richard V. Kesseli, John M. Burke, Richard W. Michelmore, Loren H. Rieseberg, Stephanie Anne Pearl & Graeme D. M. Bell
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Weeds cause considerable environmental and economic damage. However, genomic characterization of weeds has lagged behind that of model plants and crop species. Here we report on the development of genomic tools and resources for 11 weeds from the Compositae family that will serve as a basis for subsequent population and comparative genomic analyses. Because hybridization has been suggested as a stimulus for the evolution of invasiveness, we also analyze these genomic...

Data from: Rain, predators, and spider sociality: a manipulative experiment

Catherine R. Hoffman & Leticia Avilés
Group-living organisms offer a unique perspective on how environmental gradients influence geographic distributions, as not only the properties of individuals, but also those of their groups interact with the environment to determine a species range. In turn, the ranges of group-living organisms should provide insights on the conditions that favor group versus solitary living. Here we show that rain intensity and predation by ants, factors postulated to exclude subsocial Anelosimus spiders from the lowland tropical...

Data from: Post-glacial recolonization of the North American Arctic by Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus): genetic evidence of multiple northern refugia and hybridization between glacial lineages

Jean-Sébastien Moore, Robert Bajno, James D. Reist & Eric B. Taylor
Aims: We investigated post-glacial recolonization of the North American Arctic by Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and examined potential hybridization between different glacial lineages upon secondary contact. Location: North American Arctic and adjacent areas. Methods: We collected mtDNA sequence data from 1355 individuals from 110 sampling locations and data from nine microsatellite loci from 931 individuals from 37 locations. We assessed the phylogenetic relationships and geographical distribution of mtDNA haplotypes and conducted historical demographic analyses. We...

Data from: The evolutionary history of ferns inferred from 25 low-copy nuclear genes

Carl J. Rothfels, Fay-Wei Li, Erin M. Sigel, Layne Huiet, Anders Larsson, Dylan O. Burge, Markus Ruhsam, Michael Deyholos, Douglas E. Soltis, , Shane W. Shaw, Lisa Pokorny, Tao Chen, Claude DePamphilis, Lisa DeGironimo, Li Chen, Xiaofeng Wei, Xiao Sun, Petra Korall, Dennis W. Stevenson, Sean W. Graham, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Kathleen M. Pryer, C. Neal Stewart, Gane K-S. Wong … & Claude De Pamphilis
Premise of the study: Understanding fern (monilophyte) phylogeny and its evolutionary timescale is critical for broad investigations of the evolution of land plants, and for providing the point of comparison necessary for studying the evolution of the fern sister group, seed plants. Molecular phylogenetic investigations have revolutionized our understanding of fern phylogeny, however, to date, these studies have relied almost exclusively on plastid data. Methods: Here we take a curated phylogenomics approach to infer the...

Data from: Rethinking refugia: tree topology, divergence dates, and demographic history trace the distribution of the endangered Plymouth gentian (Sabatia kennedyana) from the Pleistocene glaciation to present day

Adriana Suarez-Gonzalez, Jolene T. Sutton, Andrew J. Trant, Elena Zamlynny & Sara V. Good
Premise of study: Molecular population genetics is a powerful tool to infer how species responded to past environmental change. In the northern hemisphere, interest is increasing in how species responded to changes in ice coverage and temperature during the last glaciation maximum (LGM, between 18000–21000 yr ago) with a common assumption that glacial refugia were located at the southern edge of a species range. Methods: We reconstructed the glacial and postglacial phylogeography of Sabatia kennedyana,...

Data from: Colonization history, host distribution, anthropogenic influence and landscape features shape populations of white pine blister rust, an invasive alien tree pathogen

Simren Brar, Clement K. M. Tsui, Braham Dhillon, Marie-Josée Bergeron, David L. Joly, P. J. Zambino, Yousry A. El-Kassaby & Richard C. Hamelin
White pine blister rust is caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales). This invasive alien pathogen was introduced into North America at the beginning of the 20th century on pine seedlings imported from Europe and has caused serious economic and ecological impacts. In this study, we applied a population and landscape genetics approach to understand the patterns of introduction and colonization as well as population structure and migration of C. ribicola....

Data from: Shared genetic diversity across the global invasive range of the Monk parakeet suggests a common restricted geographic origin and the possibility of convergent selection

Pim Edelaar, Severine Roques, Elizabeth A. Hobson, Anders Gonçalves Da Silva, Michael L. Avery, Michael A. Russello, Juan Carlos Senar, Timothy F. Wright, Martina Carrete & Jose Luis Tella
While genetic diversity is hypothesized to be an important factor explaining invasion success, there is no consensus yet on how variation in source populations or demographic processes affects invasiveness. We used mitochondrial DNA haplotypic and microsatellite genotypic data to investigate levels of genetic variation and reconstruct the history of replicate invasions on three continents in a globally invasive bird, the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). We evaluated whether genetic diversity at invasive sites could be explained...

Data from: Flowering time of butterfly nectar food plants is more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly adult flight

Heather M. Kharouba & Mark Vellend
1. Variation among species in their phenological responses to temperature change suggests that shifts in the relative timing of key life cycle events between interacting species are likely to occur under climate warming. However, it remains difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these shifts given that there have been few comparisons of phenological sensitivities to temperature across interacting species. 2. Here, we used a broad-scale approach utilizing collection records to compare the temperature...

Data from: Resources alter the structure and increase stochasticity in bromeliad microfauna communities

Jana S. Petermann, Pavel Kratina, Nicolas A. C. Marino, A. Andrew M. MacDonald, Diane S. Srivastava & Nicholas A. C. Marino
Although stochastic and deterministic processes have been found to jointly shape structure of natural communities, the relative importance of both forces may vary across different environmental conditions and across levels of biological organization. We tested the effects of abiotic environmental conditions, altered trophic interactions and dispersal limitation on the structure of aquatic microfauna communities in Costa Rican tank bromeliads. Our approach combined natural gradients in environmental conditions with experimental manipulations of bottom-up interactions (resources), top-down...

Data from: Topology of tree-mycorrhizal fungus interaction networks in xeric and mesic Douglas-fir forests

Kevin J. Beiler, Suzanne W. Simard & Daniel M. Durall
1. From the phytocentric perspective, a mycorrhizal network (MN) is formed when the roots of two or more plants are colonized by the same fungal genet. MNs can be modelled as interaction networks with plants as nodes and fungal genets as links. The potential effects of MNs on facilitation or competition between plants are increasingly recognized, but their network topologies remain largely unknown. This information is needed to understand the ecological significance of MN functional...

Data from: Too much of a good thing: The unique and repeated paths toward copper adaptation

Aleeza C. Gerstein, Jasmine Ono, Dara S. Lo, Marcus L. Campbell, Anastasia Kuzmin & Sarah P. Otto
Copper is a micronutrient essential for growth due to its role as a co-factor in enzymes involved in respiration, defense against oxidative damage, and iron uptake. Yet too much of a good thing can be lethal, and yeast cells typically do not have tolerance to copper levels much beyond the concentration in their ancestral environment. Here, we report a short-term evolutionary study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to levels of copper sulfate that are inhibitory to...

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