77 Works

Natural enemies of crop pests in oilseed rape fields in relation to local plant diversity and landscape characteristics

R.F. Shaw, J.K. Pell, J.W. Redhead, J.M. Bullock & J.L. Osborne
The number and type of natural enemies of crop pests found in winter-sown oilseed rape fields (Brassica napus L.) in relation to local plant diversity (in crop and field margin) and landscape characteristics. Natural enemies and pests were collected using two methods (suction sampling and pitfall traps). Local plant diversity was assessed using quadrats in field margins and in cropped area. The presence of hedges was also recorded. Landscape characteristics include the amount of mass...

Data from: Effects of increased N and P availability on biomass allocation and root carbohydrate reserves differ between N‐fixing and non‐N‐fixing savanna tree seedlings

Varun Varma, Arockia M. Catherin & Mahesh Sankaran
In mixed tree‐grass ecosystems, tree recruitment is limited by demographic bottlenecks to seedling establishment arising from inter‐ and intra‐life‐form competition, and disturbances such as fire. Enhanced nutrient availability resulting from anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition can alter the nature of these bottlenecks by changing seedling growth and biomass allocation patterns, and lead to longer‐term shifts in tree community composition if different plant functional groups respond differently to increased nutrient availability. However, the extent...

Data from: Temperature drives diversification in a model adaptive radiation

Quan-Guo Zhang, Han-Shu Lu & Angus Buckling
The warmer regions harbor more species, attributable to accelerated speciation and increased ecological opportunities for coexistence. While correlations between temperature and energy availability and habitat area have been suggested as major drivers of these biodiversity patterns, temperature can theoretically also have direct effects on the evolution of diversity. Here we experimentally studied the evolution of diversity in a model adaptive radiation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens across a temperature gradient. Diversification increased at higher temperatures,...

Data from: Specific adaptation to strong competitors can offset the negative effects of population size reductions

Xin-Feng Zhao, Angus Buckling, Quan-Guo Zhang & Elze Hesse
Competition plays a crucial role in determining adaptation of species, yet we know little as to how adaptation is affected by the strength of competition. On the one hand, strong competition typically results in population size reductions, which can hamper adaptation due to a shortage of beneficial mutations; on the other hand, specificity of adaptation to competitors may offset the negative evolutionary consequences of such population size effects. Here, we investigate how competition strength affects...

Data from: Territorial defence in a network: audiences only matter to male crabs primed for confrontation

Safi K. Darden, Maggie K. May, Natasha K. Boyland & Torben Dabelsteen
Territorial contests often occur in the presence of conspecifics not directly involved in the interaction. Actors may alter their behaviour in the presence of this audience, an ‘audience effect’, and audiences themselves may alter their behaviour as a result of observing an interaction, a ‘bystander effect’. Previous work has documented these effects by looking at each in isolation, but to our knowledge, none has investigated their interaction; something that is more likely to represent a...

Data from: The early-life environment and individual plasticity in life history

Ornela De Gasperin, Ana Duarte, Sinead English, Alfredo Attisano & Rebecca M. Kilner
We tested whether the early-life environment can influence the extent of individual plasticity in a life history trait. We asked: can the early-life environment explain why, in response to the same adult environmental cue, some individuals invest more than others in current reproduction? And can it additionally explain why investment in current reproduction trades off against survival in some individuals, but is positively correlated with survival in others? We addressed these questions using the burying...

Data from: Fish in habitats with higher motorboat disturbance show reduced sensitivity to motorboat noise

Harry R. Harding, Timothy A.C. Gordon, Rachel E. Hsuan, Alex C.E. Mackaness, Andrew N. Radford, Stephen D. Simpson, Alex C. E. Mackaness & Timothy A. C. Gordon
Anthropogenic noise can negatively impact many taxa worldwide. It is possible that in noisy, high-disturbance environments the range and severity of impacts could diminish over time, but the influence of previous disturbance remains untested in natural conditions. This study demonstrates effects of motorboat noise on the physiology of an endemic cichlid fish in Lake Malaŵi. Exposure to motorboats driven 20–100 m from fish and loudspeaker-playback of motorboat noise both elevated oxygen-consumption rate at a single...

Data from: No evidence of quantitative signal honesty across species of aposematic burnet moths (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae)

Emmanuelle S. Briolat, Mika Zagrobelny, Carl E. Olsen, Jonathan D. Blount & Martin Stevens
Many defended species use conspicuous visual warning signals to deter potential predators from attacking. Traditional theory holds that these signals should converge on similar forms, yet variation in visual traits and the levels of defensive chemicals is common, both within and between species. It is currently unclear how the strength of signals and potency of defences might be related: conflicting theories suggest that aposematic signals should be quantitatively honest, or, in contrast, that investment in...

Data from: Genotype-by-sex-by-diet interactions for nutritional preference, dietary consumption and lipid deposition in a field cricket

James Rapkin, Kim Jensen, Clarissa M. House, Alastair J. Wilson & John Hunt
Changes in feeding behaviour, especially the over-consumption of calories, has led to a rise in the rates of obesity, diabetes and other associated disorders in humans and a range of animals inhabiting human-influenced environments. However, understanding the relative contribution of genes, the nutritional environment and their interaction to dietary intake and lipid deposition in the sexes still remains a major challenge. By combining nutritional geometry with quantitative genetics, we determined the effect of genes, the...

Data from: The foot is more than a spring: human foot muscles perform work to adapt to the energetic requirements of locomotion

Ryan Riddick, Dominic J. Farris & Luke A. Kelly
The foot has been considered both as an elastic mechanism that increases the efficiency of locomotion by recycling energy, as well as an energy sink that helps stabilize movement by dissipating energy through contact with the ground. We measured the activity of two intrinsic foot muscles, Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) and Abductor Hallucis (AH), as well as the mechanical work performed by the foot as a whole and at a modelled plantar muscle tendon unit...

Data from: The costs of kleptoparasitism: a study of mixed-species seabird breeding colonies

Davide Gaglio, Richard B. Sherley, Timothée R. Cook, Peter G. Ryan & Tom Flower
Mixed-species assemblages are common in nature, providing mutual benefits to associating species including anti-predator advantages or resource facilitation. However, associating with other species may also impose costs through kleptoparasitism (food theft). Identification of these costs, and how they vary when different species breed alongside one another, is essential to understand the payoffs of mixed-species assemblages. We explore the costs of kleptoparasitism for greater crested terns Thalasseus bergii provisioning offspring at a single-species colony, where individuals...

Pollinator effectiveness in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in relation to behavioural and morphological characteristics

R.F. Shaw, B.B. Phillips, A. Williams, J.M. Bullock & J.L. Osborne
The number of pollen grains delivered to stigmas in a single visit by flower visitors (from insect orders Coleoptera, Hymenoptera and Diptera) to oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in southern England. Behavioural and morphological data were also recorded for a subset of visits to understand common traits which led to improved pollen delivery. These data were collected as part of Wessex BESS project, funded by the NERC Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability research program. This...

Yield of winter-sown oilseed rape plants in relation to insect pollination

R.F. Shaw, J.M. Bullock & J.L. Osborne
Yield data on winter sown oilseed rape plants, in relation to pollination by insects and in relation to the ecosystem services provided by beneficial insects. Data includes yield assessed for entire field, whole plant and within different parts of the plant (per raceme and per pod). These data can be linked to the related natural enemy data set and the pollinator data set collected as part of the Wessex BESS project, funded by the NERC...

CMIP5 GCM-based monthly patterns of local meteorological change, per degree of mean land warming, for driving the IMOGEN impacts model

E. Comyn-Platt, G. Hayman, C. Huntingford, S. Chadburn, E. Burke, A. Harper, W. Collins, C. Webber, T. Powell, P. Cox, N. Gedney & S. Sitch
This dataset consists of monthly spatial patterns of meteorological change for 34 Global Circulation Models (GCMs). The patterns are a set of regression coefficients, each representing the change per degree of mean global warming over land, for the corresponding meteorological variable. The meteorological variables analysed for each GCM include: surface temperature change per degree global warming (K K-1); surface relative humidity change per degree global warming (percentage of K-1); wind change per degree global warming...

Data from: Age-dependent variation in the terminal investment threshold in male crickets

Kristin Rae Duffield, Kylie Jean Hampton, Thomas Miles Houslay, John Hunt, James Rapkin, Scott K. Sakaluk & Ben Michael Sadd
The terminal investment hypothesis proposes that decreased expectation of future reproduction (e.g., arising from a threat to survival) should precipitate increased investment in current reproduction. The level at which a cue of decreased survival is sufficient to trigger terminal investment (i.e., the terminal investment threshold) may vary according to other factors that influence expectation for future reproduction. We test whether the terminal investment threshold varies with age in male crickets, using heat-killed bacteria to simulate...

Data from: Effects of winter food provisioning on the phenotypes of breeding blue tits

Kate E. Plummer, Stuart Bearhop, David I. Leech, Dan E. Chamberlain & Jonathan D. Blount
Throughout the Western World huge numbers of people regularly supply food for wild birds. However, evidence of negative impacts of winter feeding on future reproduction has highlighted a need to improve understanding of the underlying mechanisms shaping avian responses to supplementary food. Here, we test the possibility that carry-over effects are mediated via their impact on the phenotypes of breeding birds, either by influencing the phenotypic structure of populations through changes in winter survival and/or...

Data from: Multi-proxy evidence highlights a complex evolutionary legacy of maize in South America

Logan Kistler, S. Yoshi Maezumi, Jonas Gregorio De Souza, Natalia A. S. Przelomska, Flaviane Malaquias Costa, Oliver Smith, Hope Loiselle, Jazmín Ramos-Madrigal, Nathan Wales, Eduardo Rivail Ribeiro, Ryan R. Morrison, Claudia Grimaldo, Andre P. Prous, Bernardo Arriaza, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Fabio De Oliveira Freitas & Robin G. Allaby
Domesticated maize evolved from wild teosinte under human influences in Mexico beginning around 9,000 BP, traversed Central America by ~7,500 BP, and spread into South America by ~6,500 BP. Landrace and archaeological maize genomes from South America suggest that the ancestral population to South American maize was brought out of the domestication center in Mexico and became isolated from the wild teosinte gene pool before traits of domesticated maize were fixed. Deeply structured lineages then...

Data from: Ancient genomes revisit the ancestry of domestic and Przewalski’s horses

Charleen Gaunitz, Antoine Fages, Kristian Hanghøj, Anders Albrechtsen, Naveed Khan, Mikkel Schubert, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Ivy J. Owens, Sabine Felkel, Olivier Bignon-Lau, Peter De Barros Damgaard, Alissa Mittnik, Azadeh F. Mohaseb, Hossein Davoudi, Saleh Alquraishi, Ahmed H. Alfarhan, Khaled A. S. Al-Rasheid, Eric Crubézy, Norbert Benecke, Sandra Olsen, Dorcas Brown, David Anthony, Ken Massy, Vladimir Pitulko, Aleksei Kasparov … & Ludovic Orlando
The Eneolithic Botai culture of the Central Asian steppes provides the earliest archaeological evidence for horse husbandry, ~5500 years ago, but the exact nature of early horse domestication remains controversial. We generated 42 ancient-horse genomes, including 20 from Botai. Compared to 46 published ancient- and modern-horse genomes, our data indicate that Przewalski’s horses are the feral descendants of horses herded at Botai and not truly wild horses. All domestic horses dated from ~4000 years ago...

Data from: Impact of person-centred care training and person-centred activities on quality of life, agitation, and antipsychotic use in people with dementia living in nursing homes: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

Clive Ballard, Anne Corbett, Martin Orrell, Gareth Williams, Esme Moniz-Cook, Renee Romeo, Bob Woods, Lucy Garrod, Ingelin Testad, Barbara Woodward-Carlton, Jennifer Wenborn, Martin Knapp & Jane Fossey
Background: Agitation is a common, challenging symptom affecting large numbers of people with dementia and impacting on quality of life (QoL). There is an urgent need for evidence-based, cost-effective psychosocial interventions to improve these outcomes, particularly in the absence of safe, effective pharmacological therapies. This study aimed evaluate the efficacy of a person-centered care and psychosocial intervention (WHELD) on QoL, agitation and antipsychotic use in people with dementia living in nursing homes, and to determine...

Data from: The role of indirect genetic effects in the evolution of interacting reproductive behaviors in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides

Mauricio J. Carter, Alastair J. Wilson, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Social interactions can give rise to indirect genetic effects (IGEs), which occur when genes expressed in one individual affect the phenotype of another individual. The evolutionary dynamics of traits can be altered when there are IGEs. Sex often involves indirect effects arising from first order (current) or second order (prior) social interactions, yet IGEs are infrequently quantified for reproductive behaviors. Here, we use experimental populations of burying beetles that have experienced bidirectional selection on mating...

Data from: Shock and stabilisation following long-term drought in tropical forest from 15 years of litterfall dynamics

Lucy Rowland, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Alex A. R. Oliveira, Samuel S. Almeida, Leandro V. Ferreira, Yadvinder Malhi, Dan B. Metcalfe, Maurizio Mencuccini, John Grace & Patrick Meir
Litterfall dynamics in tropical forests are a good indicator of overall tropical forest function, indicative of carbon invested in both photosynthesising tissues and reproductive organs such as flowers and fruits. These dynamics are sensitive to changes in climate, such as drought, but little is known about the long-term responses of tropical forest litterfall dynamics to extended drought stress. We present a 15-year dataset of litterfall (leaf, flower and fruit, and twigs) from the world's only...

Data from: Seabird species vary in behavioural response to drone census

Émile Brisson-Curadeau, David Bird, Chantelle Burke, David A. Fifield, Paul Pace, Richard B. Sherley & Kyle H. Elliott
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an opportunity to rapidly census wildlife in remote areas while removing some of the hazards. However, wildlife may respond negatively to the UAVs, thereby skewing counts. We surveyed four species of Arctic cliff-nesting seabirds (glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus, Iceland gull Larus glaucoides, common murre Uria aalge and thick-billed murre Uria lomvia) using a UAV and compared censusing techniques to ground photography. An average of 8.5% of murres flew off in...

Data from: Drone‐based structure‐from‐motion photogrammetry captures grassland sward height variability

Joel Forsmoo, Karen Anderson, Christopher J. A. Macleod, Mark E. Wilkinson & Richard Brazier
Grasslands deliver a range of ecosystem services, including the provision of food and biodiversity, and regulation of soil carbon storage and hydrology. Monitoring schemes are needed to quantify spatial changes in these multiple functions alongside ecosystem degradation. Sward height is widely recognised as a key spatial variable in the provision of these services. Current manual monitoring approaches are labour intensive, and often fail to capture spatial patterns of important features, including sward height. Proximal sensing...

Data from: Phylogeny, evidence for a cryptic plastid, and distribution of Chytriodinium parasites (Dinophyceae) infecting copepods

Jürgen F.H. Strassert, Elisabeth Hehenberger, Javier Del Campo, Noriko Okamoto, Martin Kolisko, Thomas A. Richards, Alexandra Z. Worden, Alyson E. Santoro, Patrick J. Keeling & Javier Campo
Spores of the dinoflagellate Chytriodinium are known to infest copepod eggs causing their lethality. Despite the potential to control the population of such an ecologically important host, knowledge about Chytriodinium parasites is limited: we know little about phylogeny, parasitism, abundance, or geographical distribution. We carried out genome sequence surveys on four manually isolated sporocytes from the same sporangium to analyse the phylogenetic position of Chytriodinium based on SSU and concatenated SSU/LSU rRNA gene sequences, and...

Data from: Biallelic SQSTM1 mutations in early-onset, variably progressive neurodegeneration

Valentina Muto, Elisabetta Flex, Zachary Kupchinsky, Guido Primiano, Hamid Galehdari, Mohammadreza Dehghani, Serena Cecchetti, Giovanna Carpentieri, Teresa Rizza, Neda Mazaheri, Alireza Sedaghat, Mohammad Yahya Vahidi Mehrjardi, Alice Traversa, Michela Di Nottia, Maria M. Kousi, Yalda Jamshidi, Andrea Ciolfi, Viviana Caputo, Reza Azizi Malamiri, Francesca Pantaleoni, Simone Martinelli, Aaron R. Jeffries, Jawaher Zeighami, Amir Sherafat, Daniela Di Giuda … & Marco Tartaglia
Objective: To characterize clinically and molecularly an early-onset, variably progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a cerebellar syndrome with severe ataxia, gaze palsy, dyskinesia, dystonia, and cognitive decline affecting 11 individuals from 3 consanguineous families. Methods: We used whole-exome sequencing (WES) (families 1 and 2) and a combined approach based on homozygosity mapping and WES (family 3). We performed in vitro studies to explore the effect of the nontruncating SQSTM1 mutation on protein function and the...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    77

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    77

Affiliations

  • University of Exeter
    77
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    7
  • Lund University
    4
  • University of Copenhagen
    4
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of Bath
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Bangor University
    2
  • University of Sussex
    2