15 Works

Data from: Phylogeny and photosynthesis of the grass tribe Paniceae

Jacob D. Washburn, James C. Schnable, Gerrit Davidse & J. Chris Pires
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The grass tribe Paniceae includes important food, forage, and bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napiergrass, various millet species, and economically important weeds. Paniceae are also valuable for answering scientific and evolutionary questions about C4 photosynthetic evolution, drought tolerance, and spikelet variation. However, the phylogeny of the tribe remains incompletely resolved. METHODS: Forty-five taxa were selected from across the tribe Paniceae and outgroups for genome survey sequencing (GSS). These data were used...

Data from: Seasonal variation in life history traits in two Drosophila species

Emily L. Behrman, Samuel S. Watson, Katherine R. O'Brien, Shane M. Heschel, Paul S. Schmidt, K. R. O'Brien, E. L. Behrman, P. S. Schmidt & S. S. Watson
Seasonal environmental heterogeneity is cyclic, persistent and geographically widespread. In species that reproduce multiple times annually, environmental changes across seasonal time may create different selection regimes that may shape the population ecology and life history adaptation in these species. Here, we investigate how two closely related species of Drosophila in a temperate orchard respond to environmental changes across seasonal time. Natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans were sampled at four timepoints from June...

Data from: Globally, functional traits are weak predictors of juvenile tree growth, and we do not know why

C. E. Timothy Paine, Lucy Amissah, Harald Auge, Christopher Baraloto, Martin Baruffol, Nils Bourland, Helge Bruelheide, Kasso Daïnou, Roland C. De Gouvenain, Jean-Louis Doucet, Susan Doust, Paul V. A. Fine, Claire Fortunel, Josephine Haase, Karen D. Holl, Hervé Jactel, Xuefei Li, Kaoru Kitajima, Julia Koricheva, Cristina Martínez-Garza, Christian Messier, Alain Paquette, Christopher Philipson, Daniel Piotto, Lourens Poorter … & Andy Hector
1. Plant functional traits, in particular specific leaf area (SLA), wood density and seed mass, are often good predictors of individual tree growth rates within communities. Individuals and species with high SLA, low wood density and small seeds tend to have faster growth rates. 2. If community-level relationships between traits and growth have general predictive value, then similar relationships should also be observed in analyses that integrate across taxa, biogeographic regions and environments. Such global...

Data from: Lagged effects of early-season herbivores on valley oak fecundity

Ian S. Pearse, Kyle A. Funk, Thomas S. Kraft & Walter D. Koenig
The seasonal match between folivore and leaf phenology affects the annual success of arboreal folivore populations because many folivores exploit developing leaves, which are an ephemeral resource. One strategy for folivores to exploit early-season leaves is to anticipate their emergence. The consequence of this behavior for trees is that individuals that set leaves earlier may experience greater rates of folivore damage, with potential negative fitness consequences. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed the early-season phenology,...

Data from: Metabolic rate is canalized in the face of variable life history and nutritional environment

Rebecca M. Clark, Anthony J. Zera & Spencer T. Behmer
Despite its central importance in organismal physiology, we have poor understanding of how metabolic rate is influenced by two key factors – food nutritional content and an organism's physiological characteristics. We examined how variation in nutrients and physiological aspects of life history affect standard metabolic rate in Gryllus firmus cricket morphs that differ dramatically in flight capability and early-age fecundity. Newly moulted female morphs were fed one of 13 diets that differed in concentrations of...

Data from: The importance of terrestrial subsidies in stream food webs varies along a stream size gradient

Sarah M. Collins, Tyler J. Kohler, Steven A. Thomas, William W. Fetzer & Alexander S. Flecker
Cross system subsidies of energy and materials can be a substantial fraction of food web fluxes in ecosystems, especially when autochthonous production is strongly limited by light or nutrients. We explored whether assimilation of terrestrial energy varied in specific consumer taxa collected from streams of different sizes and resource availabilities. Since headwater streams are often unproductive, we expected that inputs from surrounding terrestrial systems (i.e. leaf litter, terrestrial invertebrates) would be a more important food...

Data from: Social network structure in wintering golden-crowned sparrows is not correlated with kinship

Nina N. Arnberg, Bruce E. Lyon, Daizaburo Shizuka & Alexis S. Chaine
Stable social organization in a wide variety of organisms has been linked to kinship, which can minimize conflict due to the indirect fitness benefits from cooperating with relatives. In birds, kin selection has been mostly studied in the context of reproduction or in species that are social year round. Many birds however are migratory, and the role of kinship in the winter societies of these species is virtually unexplored. In a previous study, we discovered...

Data from: Research design considerations to ensure detection of all species in an avian community

Maggi Sliwinski, Larkin Powell, Nicola Koper, Matthew Giovanni & Walter Schacht
1.Recent advances in the estimation of species richness from count data have allowed avian ecologists to incorporate incomplete detectability of species when comparing richness across space or time. Raw counts from single or repeated visits to sample point(s) are nonetheless still used for assessing community composition, and the failure to account for detectability when making these evaluations may lead to incorrect inferences about the community. 2.We estimated detection probabilities (p) for a suite of bird...

Data from: The domain specificity of intertemporal choice in pinyon jays

Jeffrey R. Stevens, Bryce A. Kennedy, Dina Morales & Marianna Burks
When choosing between a piece of cake now versus a slimmer waistline in the future, many of us have difficulty with self-control. Food-caching species, however, regularly hide food for later recovery, sometimes waiting months before retrieving their caches. It remains unclear whether these long-term choices generalize outside of the caching domain. We hypothesized that the ability to save for the future is a general tendency that cuts across different situations. To test this hypothesis, we...

Data from: Ectoparasitism shortens the breeding season in a colonial bird

Charles R. Brown, Mary Bomberger Brown, M. B. Brown & C. R. Brown
When blood-feeding parasites increase seasonally, their deleterious effects may prevent some host species, especially those living in large groups where parasites are numerous, from reproducing later in the summer. Yet the role of parasites in regulating the length of a host's breeding season—and thus the host's opportunity for multiple brooding—has not been systematically investigated. The highly colonial cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota), a temperate-latitude migratory songbird in the western Great Plains, USA, typically has a relatively...

Data from: Intertemporal similarity: discounting as a last resort

Jeffrey R. Stevens
Standard models of intertemporal choice assume that individuals discount future payoffs by integrating reward amounts and time delays to generate a discounted value. Alternative models propose that, rather than integrate across them, individuals compare within attributes (amounts and delays) to determine if differences in one attribute outweigh differences in another attribute. For instance, the similarity model 1) compares the two reward amounts to determine whether they are similar, 2) compares the similarity of the two...

Data from: Sex-specific and individual preferences for hunting strategies in white sharks

Alison V. Towner, Vianey Leos-Barajas, Roland Langrock, Robert S. Shick, Malcolm J. Smale, Tami Kaschke, Oliver J.D. Jewell, Yannis P. Papastamatiou, Robert S. Schick & Oliver J. D. Jewell
Fine-scale predator movements may be driven by many factors including sex, habitat, and distribution of resources. There may also be individual preferences for certain movement strategies within a population which can be hard to quantify. Within top predators, movements are also going to be directly related to the mode of hunting; for example sit-and-wait or actively searching for prey. Although there is mounting evidence that different hunting modes can cause opposing trophic cascades, there has...

Data from: Hybridization and reproductive isolation between diploid Erythronium mesochoreum and its tetraploid congener E. albidum (Liliaceae)

Kathy Roccaforte, Sabrina E. Russo & Diana Pilson
Polyploidy has played an important role in angiosperm diversification, but how polyploidy contributes to reproductive isolation remains poorly understood. Most work has focused on postzygotic reproductive barriers, and the influence of ploidy differences on prezygotic barriers is understudied. To address these gaps, we quantified hybrid occurrence, interspecific self-compatibility differences, and the contributions of multiple pre- and postzygotic barriers to reproductive isolation between diploid Erythronium mesochoreum (Liliaceae) and its tetraploid congener E. albidum. Reproductive isolation between...

Data from: Use of opportunistic sightings and expert knowledge to predict and compare Whooping Crane stopover habitat

Trevor J. Hefley, David M. Baasch, Andrew J. Tyre & Erin E. Blankenship
Predicting a species’ distribution can be helpful for evaluating management actions such as critical habitat designations under the U.S. Endangered Species Act or habitat acquisition and rehabilitation. Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) are one of the rarest birds in the world, and conservation and management of habitat is required to ensure their survival. We developed a species distribution model (SDM) that could be used to inform habitat management actions for Whooping Cranes within the state of...

Data from: Comparative population genomics of latitudinal variation in D. simulans and D. melanogaster

Heather E. Machado, Alan O. Bergland, Emily L. Behrman, Katherine R. O'Brien, Paul S. Schmidt & Dmitri A. Petrov
Examples of clinal variation in phenotypes and genotypes across latitudinal transects have served as important models for understanding how spatially varying selection and demographic forces shape variation within species. Here we examine the selective and demographic contributions to latitudinal variation through the largest comparative genomic study to date of Drosophila simulans and D. melanogaster, with genomic sequence data from 382 individual fruit flies, collected across a spatial transect of 19 degrees latitude and at multiple...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Nebraska–Lincoln
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  • University of Pennsylvania
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  • University of California System
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  • Cornell University
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  • University of Kansas
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  • University of Liège
    1
  • Federal University of Southern Bahia
    1
  • Stanford University
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  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Dyer Island Conservation Trust
    1
  • Del Rosario University
    1
  • Rhodes University
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  • Texas A&M University
    1
  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
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  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    1