69 Works

Soil profile descriptions, biomass data and vegetation species from a joint sampling event at Sourhope, Scotland, 2000 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

S. Buckland, C. Cornish, N. Ray, P. Bruneau, L. Dawson & J. Ross
This dataset includes: biomass data for roots, shoots and litter in soil core samples, vegetation species abundance data for sampled soil blocks, and soil profile descriptions (horizon types & depths) with corresponding pH and moisture content values by horizon for soil blocks. All data were collected during a joint sampling event, held at Sourhope, Scotland, where co-ordinated sampling took place on the 27-28th July 2000 involving groups from within the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. A...

Earthworm data from Sourhope field experiment site, Scotland, 1999 and 2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

H.O. Bishop, I.C. Grieve, J.A. Chudek & D.W. Hopkins
This set of data describes earthworm diversity in soil samples taken at the Sourhope experimental site in 1999 and 2001 by the Universities of Glasgow and Dundee. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)...

Stakeholder surveys to local farmers and officials in Chinese villages to understand knowledge management dynamics

Y. Zheng, L. Naylor, S. Waldron & D. Oliver
Data comprise results of social surveys carried out in China during 2016 – 2018 to the local stakeholders (farmers and village to county level officials) to understand their knowledge learning dynamics and preference. Surveys were conducted in the rural villages in Puding County, Guizhou Province and in Yujiang County, Jiangxi Province. The study was funded by the grant NE/N007425/1 which was awarded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and through cooperation with grant...

Rigg Foot topographical survey data, Sourhope field experiment site, Scotland [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

M. Whelan & S. Bradley
This resource is the raw data from a topographic survey of the Sourhope field experiment site, conducted by the Department of Environmental Science, University of Stirling in April and May 2000. The data are available to match to other data sets from the field site, or to analyse in more detail. The data were collected as part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located...

Earthworm and botanical data from the Sweethope mesocosm experimental site, Sourhope, Scotland, 2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

C.A. Spring, H.O. Bishop, M. Pawlett, C.H. Robinson, I.C. Grieve, J.A. Chudek, D.W. Hopkins, J. A. Harris & D.A. Davidson
This dataset comprises botanical composition and earthworm species and abundance data, sampled from a mesocosm experiment (named Sweethope) in October 2001. The mesocosm site replicated the layout of the main experimental plots at the NERC Soil Biodiversity site at Sourhope, Scotland and was established to avoid contaminating the main Sourhope plots. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at...

Survey data of scientists on knowledge exchange in critical zone and geoscience

Y. Zheng, L.A Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Survey data on knowledge exchange experience of both Chinese and British scientists working on critical zone and more broadly on geoscience. Data are drawn from questionnaire surveys to explore the knowledge management methods used in their environmental research. Data are anonymised social survey data from questionnaires. The data were generated during the NERC grant 'The transmissive critical zone: understanding the karst hydrology-biogeochemical interface for sustainable management' reference NE/N007425/1 undertaken as part of the NERC Using...

Literature review of knowledge management across the environment-policy interface in China

Y. Zheng, L.A Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Data from literature search systematically conducted using two widely-used academic databases: Web of Science™ (WoS) and Scopus . Data include the annual amount of KM publication in China and across the world, in WoS, the total amount of knowledge management (KM) publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), in Scopus, the total amount of KM publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), information about the retained KM publication for...

Tree diversity is key for promoting the diversity and abundance of forest‐associated taxa in Europe

Eric Allan, Evy Ampoorter, Luc Barbaro, Hervé Jactel, Lander Baeten, Johanna Boberg, Monique Carnol, Bastien Castagneyrol, Yohan Charbonnier, Seid Muhie Dawud, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Hans De Wandeler, Virginie Guyot, Stephan Hättenschwiler, François‐Xavier Joly, Julia Koricheva, Harriet Milligan, Bart Muys, Diem Nguyen, Sophia Ratcliffe, Karsten Raulund‐Rasmussen, Michael Scherer‐Lorenzen, Fons Plas, J. Van Keer … & Lars Vesterdal
Plant diversity is an important driver of diversity at other trophic levels, suggesting that cascading extinctions could reduce overall biodiversity. Most evidence for positive effects of plant diversity comes from grasslands. Despite the fact that forests are hotspots of biodiversity, the importance of tree diversity, in particular its relative importance compared to other management related factors, in affecting forest‐associated taxa is not well known. To address this, we used data from 183 plots, located in...

Invasion of freshwater ecosystems is promoted by network connectivity to hotspots of human activity

Daniel Chapman
Aim: Hotspots of human activity are focal points for ecosystem disturbance and non-native introduction, from which invading populations disperse and spread. As such, connectivity to locations used by humans may influence the likelihood of invasion. Moreover, connectivity in freshwater ecosystems may follow the hydrological network. Here we tested whether multiple forms of connectivity to human recreational activities promotes biological invasion of freshwater ecosystems. Location: England, UK. Time period: 1990-2018. Major taxa studied: 126 non-native freshwater...

Data from: Heightened perception of competition hastens courtship

Claudia Santori, Luc Bussiere & Thomas Houslay
When animals use costly labile display or signal traits to display to the opposite sex, they face complex decisions regarding the degree and timing of their investment in separate instances of trait expression. Such decisions may be informed by not only the focal individual’s condition (or pool of available resources), but also aspects of the social environment, such as perceptions of same-sex competition or the quality of available mates. However, the relative importance of these...

Data from: Brachiopod shell thickness links environment and evolution

Uwe Balthasar, Jisuo Jin, Linda Hints & Maggie Cusack
While it is well established that the shapes and sizes of shells are strongly phylogenetically controlled, little is known about the phylogenetic constraints on shell thickness. Yet, shell thickness is likely to be sensitive to environmental fluctuations and has the potential to illuminate environmental perturbations through deep time. Here we systematically quantify the thickness of the anterior brachiopod shell which protects the filtration chamber and is thus considered functionally homologous across higher taxa of brachiopods....

Data from: Unravelling the evolutionary history and future prospects of endemic species restricted to former glacial refugia

Orly Razgour, Irene Salicini, Carlos Ibáñez, Ettore Randi & Javier Juste
The contemporary distribution and genetic composition of biodiversity bear a signature of species’ evolutionary histories and the effects of past climatic oscillations. For many European species, the Mediterranean peninsulas of Iberia, Italy and the Balkans acted as glacial refugia and the source of range recolonization, and as a result, they contain disproportionately high levels of diversity. As these areas are particularly threatened by future climate change, it is important to understand how past climatic changes...

Data from: Globally, functional traits are weak predictors of juvenile tree growth, and we do not know why

C. E. Timothy Paine, Lucy Amissah, Harald Auge, Christopher Baraloto, Martin Baruffol, Nils Bourland, Helge Bruelheide, Kasso Daïnou, Roland C. De Gouvenain, Jean-Louis Doucet, Susan Doust, Paul V. A. Fine, Claire Fortunel, Josephine Haase, Karen D. Holl, Hervé Jactel, Xuefei Li, Kaoru Kitajima, Julia Koricheva, Cristina Martínez-Garza, Christian Messier, Alain Paquette, Christopher Philipson, Daniel Piotto, Lourens Poorter … & Andy Hector
1. Plant functional traits, in particular specific leaf area (SLA), wood density and seed mass, are often good predictors of individual tree growth rates within communities. Individuals and species with high SLA, low wood density and small seeds tend to have faster growth rates. 2. If community-level relationships between traits and growth have general predictive value, then similar relationships should also be observed in analyses that integrate across taxa, biogeographic regions and environments. Such global...

Data from: Genomics of invasion: diversity and selection in introduced populations of monkeyflowers (Mimulus guttatus)

Joshua Puzey & Mario Vallejo-Marín
Global trade and travel is irreversibly changing the distribution of species around the world. Because introduced species experience drastic demographic events during colonisation, and often face novel environmental challenges from their native range, introduced populations may undergo rapid evolutionary change. Genomic studies provide the opportunity to investigate the extent to which demographic, historical, and selective processes shape the genomic structure of introduced populations by analysing the signature that these processes leave on genomic variation. Here...

Data from: The developmental plasticity and functional significance of an additional sperm storage compartment in female yellow dung flies

Martin A. Schäfer, David Berger, Ralf Jochmann, Wolf U. Blanckenhorn & Luc F. Bussière
1. The mechanistic basis for, and adaptive significance of variation in female sperm storage organs is important for a range of questions concerning sexual selection and speciation, as such variation influences the evolutionary trajectories of male fertilization related traits and may facilitate speciation through its effects on gamete recognition. 2. Female yellow dung flies (Scathophaga stercoraria) usually develop three sperm storage compartments, and this subdivision may be an adaptation for sorting sperm during post-copulatory choice....

Data from: The effectiveness of journals as arbiters of scientific quality

C.E. Timothy Paine, Charles W. Fox & C. E. Timothy Paine
Academic publishers purport to be arbiters of knowledge, aiming to publish studied that advance the frontiers of their research domain. Yet the effectiveness of journal editors at identifying novel and important research is generally unknown, in part because of the confidential nature of the editorial and peer-review process. Using questionnaires, we evaluated the degree to which journals are effective arbiters of scientific impact in the domain of Ecology, quantified by three key criteria. First, journals...

Data from: Parallel evolution and adaptation to environmental factors in a marine flatfish: implications for fisheries and aquaculture management of the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

Fernanda Dotti Do Prado, Manuel Vera, Miguel Hermida, Carmen Bouza, Belén G. Pardo, Román Vilas, Andrés Blanco, Carlos Fernández, Francesco Maroso, Gregory E. Maes, Cemal Turan, Filip A.M. Volckaert, John B. Taggart, Adrian Carr, Rob Ogden, Einar E. Nielsen, The Aquatrace Consortium, Paulino Martínez, Filip A. M. Volckaert & Einar Eg Nielsen
Unraveling adaptive genetic variation represents, in addition to the estimate of population demographic parameters, a cornerstone for the management of aquatic natural living resources, which in turn, represent the raw material for breeding programs. The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a marine flatfish of high commercial value living on the European continental shelf. While wild populations are declining, aquaculture is flourishing in Southern Europe. We evaluated the genetic structure of turbot throughout its natural distribution range...

Data from: Life-stage associated remodeling of lipid metabolism regulation in Atlantic salmon

Gareth Gillard, Thomas N. Harvey, Arne Gjuvsland, Yang Jin, Magny Thomassen, Sigbjorn Lien, Michael Leaver, Jacob S. Torgersen, Torgeir R. Hvidsten, Jon Olav Vik, Simen Sandve & Simen R. Sandve
Atlantic salmon migrates from rivers to sea to feed, grow and develop gonads before returning to spawn in freshwater. The transition to marine habitats is associated with dramatic changes in the environment, including water salinity, exposure to pathogens, and shift in dietary lipid availability. Many anticipatory changes in physiology occur before migration to sea, but little is known about the molecular nature of these changes. Here we use a long term feeding experiment to study...

Data from: Pattern and process in hominin brain size evolution are scale-dependent

Andrew Du, Andrew M. Zipkin, Kevin G. Hatala, Elizabeth Renner, Jennifer L. Baker, Serena Bianchi, Kallista H. Bernal & Bernard A. Wood
A large brain is a defining feature of modern humans, yet there is no consensus regarding the patterns, rates, and processes involved in hominin brain size evolution. We use a reliable proxy for brain size in fossils, endocranial volume (ECV), to better understand how brain size evolved at both clade- and lineage-level scales. For the hominin clade overall, the dominant signal is consistent with a gradual increase in brain size. This gradual trend appears to...

Data from: From animal tracks to fine-scale movement modes: a straightforward approach for identifying multiple, spatial movement patterns

Kevin Morelle, Nils Bunnefeld, Philippe Lejeune & Steve A. Oswald
1. Thanks to developments in animal tracking technology, detailed data on the movement tracks of individual animals are now attainable for many species. However, straightforward methods to decompose individual tracks into high-resolution, spatial modes are lacking but are essential to understand what an animal is doing. 2. We developed an analytical approach that combines separately-validated methods into a straightforward tool for converting animal GPS tracks to short-range movement modes. Our three-step analytical process comprises: (1)...

Data from: Cohort variation in individual body mass dissipates with age in large herbivores

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Steve Albon, Steeve D. Côté, Joseph M. Craine, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Mathieu Garel, Phyllis Lee, Cynthia Moss, Daniel H. Nussey, Fanie Pelletier, Audun Stien & Torkild Tveraa
Environmental conditions experienced during early growth and development markedly shape phenotypic traits. Consequently, individuals of the same cohort may show similar life-history tactics throughout life. Conditions experienced later in life, however, could fine-tune these initial differences, either increasing (cumulative effect) or decreasing (compensatory effect) the magnitude of cohort variation with increasing age. Our novel comparative analysis that quantifies cohort variation in individual body size trajectories shows that initial cohort variation dissipates throughout life, and that...

Data from: Genetic diversity and connectivity within Mytilus spp. in the subarctic and Arctic

Sofie S. Mathiesen, Jakob Thyrring, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Jørgen Berge, Alexey Sukhotin, Peter Leopold, Michaël Bekaert, Mikael K. Sejr, Einar E. Nielsen, Sofie Smedegaard Mathiesen, Mikael Kristian Sejr & Einar Eg Nielsen
Climate changes in the Arctic are predicted to alter distributions of marine species. However, such changes are difficult to quantify because information on present species distribution and the genetic variation within species is lacking or poorly examined. Blue mussels, Mytilus spp. are ecosystem engineers in the coastal zone globally. In order to improve knowledge of distribution and genetic structure of the Mytilus edulis complex in the Arctic, we analyzed 81 SNPs in 534 Mytilus spp....

Data from: Identification and validation of single nucleotide polymorphisms as tools to detect hybridization and population structure in freshwater stingrays

Vanessa Paes Cruz, Manuel Vera, Belén Gomes Pardo, John Taggart, Paulino Martinez, Claudio Oliveira & Fausto Foresti
Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were identified and validated for two stingrays species, Potamotrygon motoro and Potamotrygon falkneri, using double digest restriction-site associated DNA (ddRAD) reads using 454-Roche technology. A total of 226 774 reads (65.5 Mb) were obtained (mean read length 289 ± 183 bp) detecting a total of 5399 contigs (mean contig length: 396 ± 91 bp). Mining this data set, a panel of 143 in silico SNPs was selected. Eighty-two of these...

Data from: Litter conversion into detritivore faeces reshuffles the quality control over C and N dynamics during decomposition

François-Xavier Joly, Sylvain Coq, Mathieu Coulis, Johanne Nahmani & Stephan Hattenschwiler
1. In many terrestrial ecosystems, detritivorous soil organisms ingest large amounts of leaf litter returning most of it to the soil as faeces. Such conversion of leaf litter into faeces may stimulate decomposition by increasing the surface area available for microbial colonization. Yet, experimental support for either the outcome or the mechanism of these conversion effects is lacking. 2. Based on the hypothesis that the identity of plant species from which leaf litter is transformed...

Data from: Context-dependent colonisation of terrestrial habitat 'islands' by a long-distance migrant bird

Robin C. Whytock, Elisa Fuentes-Montemayor, Kevin Watts, Nicholas A. Macgregor, Lefora Williams & Kirsty J. Park
Landscape context can affect how individuals perceive patch quality during colonisation. However, although context-dependent colonisation has been observed in aquatic environments it has rarely been studied in terrestrial environments or at large spatial scales. Here, we assessed how landscape context influenced colonisation rates in a large-scale (c.7000 km2) terrestrial system where colonisers (Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus) are capable of rapid, long-distance movements. Bioacoustic recorders were used to detect first song dates (an indicator of colonisation...

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