98 Works

Data from: Dietary changes in predators and scavengers in a nocturnally illuminated riparian ecosystem

Alessandro Manfrin, David Lehmann, Roy H.A. Van Grunsven, Stefano Larsen, Jari Syväranta, Geraldene Wharton, Christian C. Voigt, Michael T. Monaghan, Franz Hölker & Roy H. A. Van Grunsven
Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked by fluxes of carbon and nutrients in riparian areas. Processes that alter these fluxes may therefore change the diet and composition of consumer communities. We used stable carbon isotope (δ13C) analyses to test whether the increased abundance of aquatic prey observed in another study led to a dietary shift in riparian consumers in areas illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN). We measured the contribution of aquatic-derived carbon to...

Data from: Genetic variation and clonal diversity in introduced populations of Mimulus guttatus assessed by genotyping at 62 single nucleotide polymorphism loci

Pauline O. Pantoja, Violeta I. Simon-Porcar, Joshua R. Puzey & Mario Vallejo-Marin
Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are increasingly being used to study non-native populations. SNPs are relatively information poor on a per locus basis, but allow genotyping more loci than others markers (e.g., microsatellites) and have the advantage of consistent allele calls between studies. Aims: We investigated the utility of a newly developed set of SNP markers, suitable for high throughput genotyping to characterise genotypic variation and population structure in non-native populations of the facultative clonal...

Data from: Whole genome duplication and transposable element proliferation drive genome expansion in Corydoradinae catfishes

Sarah Marburger, Markos A. Alexandrou, John B. Taggart, Simon Creer, Gary Carvalho, Claudio Oliveira & Martin I. Taylor
Genome size varies significantly across eukaryotic taxa and the largest changes are typically driven by macro-mutations such as whole genome duplications (WGDs) and proliferation of repetitive elements. These two processes may affect the evolutionary potential of lineages by increasing genetic variation and changing gene expression. Here we elucidate the evolutionary history and mechanisms underpinning genome size variation in a species rich group of Neotropical catfishes (Corydoradinae) with extreme variation in genome size - 0.6pg to...

Data from: Personality links with lifespan in chimpanzees

Drew M Altschul, W Donald Hopkins, Elizabeth S Herrelko, Miho Inoue-Murayama, Tetsuro Matsuzawa, James E King, Stephen R Ross, Alexander Weiss & William D Hopkins
Life-history strategies for optimizing individual fitness fall on a spectrum between maximizing reproductive efforts and maintaining physical health over time. Strategies across this spectrum are viable and different suites of personality traits have evolved to support these strategies. Using personality and survival data from 538 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) we tested whether any of the dimensions of chimpanzee personality - agreeableness, conscientiousness, dominance, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness - were associated with longevity, an attribute of...

Data from: Bergmann's body size rule operates in facultatively endothermic insects: evidence from a complex of cryptic bumblebee species

Jessica J. Scriven, Penelope R. Whitehorn, Dave Goulson & Matthew C. Tinsley
According to Bergmann’s rule we expect species with larger body size to inhabit locations with a cooler climate, where they may be well adapted to conserve heat and resist starvation. This rule is generally applied to endotherms. In contrast, body size in ectothermic invertebrates has been suggested to follow the reverse ecogeographic trend: these converse Bergmann’s patterns may be driven by the ecological constraints of shorter season length and lower food availability in cooler high...

Data from: Connectivity with primary forest determines the value of secondary tropical forests for bird conservation

Rebekah J. Mayhew, Joseph A. Tobias, Lynsey Bunnefeld & Daisy H. Dent.
Predicted species extinctions caused by the destruction and degradation of tropical primary forest may be at least partially mitigated by the expansion of regenerating secondary forest. However, the conservation value of secondary forest remains controversial, and potentially underestimated, since most previous studies have focused on young, single-aged, or isolated stands. Here we use point count surveys to compare tropical forest bird communities in 20–120-yr-old secondary forest and primary forest stands in central Panama, with varying...

Data from: Bee and floral traits affect the characteristics of the vibrations experienced by flowers during buzz-pollination

Blanca Arroyo-Correa, Ceit Beattie & Mario Vallejo-Marin
During buzz pollination, bees use their indirect flight muscles to produce vibrations that are transmitted to the flowers and result in pollen release. Although buzz pollination has been known for >100 years, we are still in the early stages of understanding how bee and floral characteristics affect the production and transmission of floral vibrations. Here we analysed floral vibrations produced by four closely related bumblebee taxa (Bombus spp.) on two buzz-pollinated plants species (Solanum spp.)....

Data from: Proactive avoidance behaviour and pace-of-life syndrome in Atlantic salmon

Børge Damsgård, Tor H. Evensen, Øyvind Øverli, Marnix Gorissen, Lars Ebbesson, Sonia Ray & Erik Höglund
Individuals in a fish population differ in key life history traits such as growth rate and body size. This raises the question of whether such traits cluster along a fast-slow growth continuum according to a pace-of-life syndrome (POLS). Fish species like salmonids may develop a bimodal size distribution, providing an opportunity to study the relationships between individual growth and behavioural responsiveness. Here we test whether proactive characteristics (bold behaviour coupled with low post-stress cortisol production)...

Invasion of freshwater ecosystems is promoted by network connectivity to hotspots of human activity

Daniel Chapman
Aim: Hotspots of human activity are focal points for ecosystem disturbance and non-native introduction, from which invading populations disperse and spread. As such, connectivity to locations used by humans may influence the likelihood of invasion. Moreover, connectivity in freshwater ecosystems may follow the hydrological network. Here we tested whether multiple forms of connectivity to human recreational activities promotes biological invasion of freshwater ecosystems. Location: England, UK. Time period: 1990-2018. Major taxa studied: 126 non-native freshwater...

Data from: Morphometric discrimination of two allozymically diagnosed sibling species of the Echinorhynchus gadi Zoega in Muller complex (Acanthocephala) in the North Sea.

Matthew T. Wayland, David I. Gibson & Christina Sommerville
Allozyme electrophoresis was used to detect biological species of the E. gadi complex from gadids from the northern North Sea. A fixed difference at one of nine enzyme loci surveyed confirmed the existence of two reproductively isolated, sympatric species. Mixed infections of two E. gadi spp. (termed A and B) were observed in Gadus morhua and Pollachius virens. E. gadi sp. B was also found in Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Merlangius merlangus. The presence of gravid...

Data from: Unravelling the evolutionary history and future prospects of endemic species restricted to former glacial refugia

Orly Razgour, Irene Salicini, Carlos Ibáñez, Ettore Randi & Javier Juste
The contemporary distribution and genetic composition of biodiversity bear a signature of species’ evolutionary histories and the effects of past climatic oscillations. For many European species, the Mediterranean peninsulas of Iberia, Italy and the Balkans acted as glacial refugia and the source of range recolonization, and as a result, they contain disproportionately high levels of diversity. As these areas are particularly threatened by future climate change, it is important to understand how past climatic changes...

Data from: Fuels and fires influence vegetation via above- and below-ground pathways in a high-diversity plant community

Paul R. Gagnon, Heather A. Passmore, Matthew Slocum, Jonathan A. Myers, Kyle E. Harms, William J. Platt & C. E. Timothy Paine
1. Fire strongly influences plant populations and communities around the world, making it an important agent of plant evolution. Fire influences vegetation through multiple pathways, both above- and belowground. Few studies have yet attempted to tie these pathways together in a mechanistic way through soil heating even though the importance of soil heating for plants in fire-prone ecosystems is increasingly recognized. 2. Here we combine an experimental approach with structural equation modelling (SEM) to simultaneously...

Comparative data for dance fly eye morphology and female ornamentation

R. Axel W. Wiberg, Rosalind L Murray, Elizabeth Herridge, Darryl T Gwynne & Luc F Bussière
These data were collected as part of a comparative study of the relationship between female ornamentation and sexual dimorphism in eye morphology. Data come from specimens collected in the field in Scotland near Loch Lomond in the summers of 2009, 2010, and 2011 as well as the summer of 2012 near Glen Williams in Ontario, Canada. The repository contains raw image files including information on magnifications at which these were taken, excel spreadsheets of morphological...

Central place foraging in a human-dominated landscape - how do common cranes select feeding sites?

Lovisa Nilsson, Jens Persson, Nils Bunnefeld & Johan Månsson
Human infrastructure and disturbance play an important role when animals select resources in human-modified landscapes. Theory predicts that animals trade food intake against costs of movement or disturbance to optimize net energy gain and fitness, but other necessary resources may also constrain the decisions, e.g. when animals repeatedly need to return to a central location, such as a nest, waterhole or night roost. Central place foraging theory states that the probability of occurrence of an...

Data from: A seascape genetic analysis reveals strong biogeographical structuring driven by contrasting processes in the polyploid saltmarsh species Puccinellia maritima and Triglochin maritima.

Romuald Rouger, Alistair S. Jump, R. Rouger & A. S. Jump
Little is known about the processes shaping population structure in saltmarshes. It is expected that the sea should act as a powerful agent of dispersal. Yet, in contrast, import of external propagules into a saltmarsh is thought to be small. To determine the level of connectivity between saltmarsh ecosystems at a macro-geographical scale, we characterised and compared the population structure of two polyploid saltmarsh species, Puccinellia maritima and Triglochin maritima based on a seascape genetics...

Data from: Genetic inactivation of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) eggs using UV-irradiation: observations and perspectives

Julie Colleter, David J. Penman, Stephane Lallement, Christian Fauvel, Tanja Hanebrekke, Renate D. Osvik, Hans C. Eilertsen, Helena D'Cotta, Beatrice Chatain & Stefano Peruzzi
Androgenesis is a form of uniparental reproduction leading to progenies inheriting only the paternal set of chromosomes. It has been achieved with variable success in a number of freshwater species and can be attained by artificial fertilization of genetically inactivated eggs following exposure to gamma (γ), X-ray or UV irradiation (haploid androgenesis) and by restoration of diploidy by suppression of mitosis using a pressure or thermal shock. The conditions for the genetic inactivation of the...

Data from: Parasite transmission in a natural multihost-multiparasite community

Stuart K. Auld, Catherine L. Searle & Meghan A. Duffy
Understanding the transmission and dynamics of infectious diseases in natural communities requires understanding the extent to which the ecology, evolution and epidemiology of those diseases are shaped by alternative hosts. We performed laboratory experiments to test how parasite spillover affected traits associated with transmission in two co-occurring parasites: the bacterium Pasteuria ramosa and the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Both parasites were capable of transmission from the reservoir host (Daphnia dentifera) to the spillover host (Ceriodaphnia dubia),...

Stakeholder surveys to local farmers and officials in Chinese villages to understand knowledge management dynamics

Y. Zheng, L. Naylor, S. Waldron & D. Oliver
Data comprise results of social surveys carried out in China during 2016 – 2018 to the local stakeholders (farmers and village to county level officials) to understand their knowledge learning dynamics and preference. Surveys were conducted in the rural villages in Puding County, Guizhou Province and in Yujiang County, Jiangxi Province. The study was funded by the grant NE/N007425/1 which was awarded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and through cooperation with grant...

Data from: Correlated evolution of mating system and floral display traits in flowering plants and its implications for the distribution of mating system variation

Carol Goodwillie, Risa D. Sargent, Susan Kalisz, Richard H. Ree, David A. Moeller, Mario Vallejo-Marin, Christopher G. Eckert, Alice A. Winn, Elizabeth Elle, Monica A. Geber & Mark O. Johnston
Reduced allocation to structures for pollinator attraction is predicted in selfing species. We explored the association between outcrossing and floral display in a broad sample of angiosperms. We used the demonstrated relationship to test for bias against selfing species in the outcrossing rate distribution, the shape of which has relevance for the stability of mixed mating. Relationships between outcrossing rate, flower size, flower number and floral display, measured as the product of flower size and...

Data from: Mating opportunities and energetic constraints drive variation in age-dependent sexual signalling

Thomas M. Houslay, Kirsty F. Houslay, James Rapkin, John Hunt & Luc F. Bussiere
When males repeatedly produce energetically expensive sexual signals, trade-offs between current and future investment can cause plasticity in age-dependent signalling. Such variation is often interpreted as alternate adaptive strategies: live fast and die young vs. slow and steady. An alternative (yet rarely tested) explanation is that condition-dependent constraints on allocation cause variation in signalling with age (‘late bloomers’ do not have early investment options). Testing this hypothesis is challenging because resource acquisition and allocation are...

Data from: Genetic diversity and connectivity within Mytilus spp. in the subarctic and Arctic

Sofie S. Mathiesen, Jakob Thyrring, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Jørgen Berge, Alexey Sukhotin, Peter Leopold, Michaël Bekaert, Mikael K. Sejr, Einar E. Nielsen, Sofie Smedegaard Mathiesen, Mikael Kristian Sejr & Einar Eg Nielsen
Climate changes in the Arctic are predicted to alter distributions of marine species. However, such changes are difficult to quantify because information on present species distribution and the genetic variation within species is lacking or poorly examined. Blue mussels, Mytilus spp. are ecosystem engineers in the coastal zone globally. In order to improve knowledge of distribution and genetic structure of the Mytilus edulis complex in the Arctic, we analyzed 81 SNPs in 534 Mytilus spp....

Data from: Evolution and conservation of Characidium sex chromosomes

Ricardo Utsunomia, Priscilla C. Scacchetti, Miguel Hermida, Raquel Fernández-Cebrián, Xoana Taboada, Carlos Fernandez, Michaël Bekaert, Natalia J. Mendes, Diego Robledo, Judith E. Mank, John B. Taggart, Claudio Oliveira, Fausto Foresti & Paulino Martínez
Fish species exhibit substantial variation in the degree of genetic differentiation between sex chromosome pairs, and therefore offer the opportunity to study the full range of sex chromosome evolution. We used restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) to study the sex chromosomes of Characidium gomesi, a species with conspicuous heteromorphic ZW/ZZ sex chromosomes. We screened 9863 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), corresponding to ~1 marker/100 kb distributed across the genome for sex-linked variation. With this data set, we...

Data from: The changing environment of conservation conflict: geese and farming in Scotland

Tom H. E. Mason, Aidan Keane, Stephen M. Redpath & Nils Bunnefeld
1.Conflict between conservation objectives and human livelihoods is ubiquitous and can be highly damaging, but the processes generating it are poorly understood. Ecological elements are central to conservation conflict, and changes in their dynamics – for instance due to anthropogenic environmental change – are likely to influence the emergence of serious human-wildlife impacts and, consequently, social conflict. 2.We used mixed-effects models to examine the drivers of historic spatio-temporal dynamics in numbers of Greenland barnacle geese...

Data from: An integrated framework to identify wildlife populations under threat from climate change

Orly Razgour, John B. Taggart, Stéphanie Manel, Javier Juste, Carlos Ibáñez, Hugo Rebelo, Antton Alberdi, Gareth Jones & Kirsty Park
Climate change is a major threat to global biodiversity that will produce a range of new selection pressures. Understanding species responses to climate change requires an interdisciplinary perspective, combining ecological, molecular and environmental approaches. We propose an applied integrated framework to identify populations under threat from climate change based on their extent of exposure, inherent sensitivity due to adaptive and neutral genetic variation and range shift potential. We consider intraspecific vulnerability and population-level responses, an...

Earthworm and botanical data from the Sweethope mesocosm experimental site, Sourhope, Scotland, 2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

C.A. Spring, H.O. Bishop, M. Pawlett, C.H. Robinson, I.C. Grieve, J.A. Chudek, D.W. Hopkins, J. A. Harris & D.A. Davidson
This dataset comprises botanical composition and earthworm species and abundance data, sampled from a mesocosm experiment (named Sweethope) in October 2001. The mesocosm site replicated the layout of the main experimental plots at the NERC Soil Biodiversity site at Sourhope, Scotland and was established to avoid contaminating the main Sourhope plots. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    7
  • 2019
    13
  • 2018
    15
  • 2017
    17
  • 2016
    13
  • 2015
    8
  • 2014
    6
  • 2013
    8
  • 2012
    6
  • 2011
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    98

Affiliations

  • University of Stirling
    97
  • University of Edinburgh
    5
  • University of Aberdeen
    4
  • University of Zurich
    4
  • Sao Paulo State University
    3
  • University of Liège
    3
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • Dalhousie University
    3
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    3
  • East Carolina University
    3