53 Works

Data from: Hoverfly locomotor activity is resilient to external influence and intrinsic factors

Malin Thyselius & Karin Nordström
Hoverflies are found across the globe, with approximately 6000 species described worldwide. Many hoverflies are being used in agriculture and some are emerging as model species for laboratory experiments. As such it is valuable to know more about their activity. Like many other dipteran flies, Eristalis hoverflies have been suggested to be strongly diurnal, but this is based on qualitative visualization by human observers. To quantify how hoverfly activity depends on internal and external factors,...

Data from: Inferring dispersal across a fragmented landscape using reconstructed families in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Toby Fountain, Arild Husby, Etsuko Nonaka, Michelle F. DiLeo, Janne H. Korhonen, Pasi Rastas, Torsti Schulz, Marjo Saastamoinen & Ilkka Hanski
Dispersal is important for determining both a species ecological processes, such as population viability, and its evolutionary processes, like gene flow and local adaptation. Yet obtaining accurate estimates in the wild through direct observation can be challenging or even impossible, particularly over large spatial and temporal scales. Genotyping many individuals from wild populations can provide detailed inferences about dispersal. We therefore utilized genomewide marker data to estimate dispersal in the classic metapopulation of the Glanville...

Data from: Widespread increases in iron concentration in European and North American freshwaters

Caroline Björnerås, Gesa A. Weyhenmeyer, Chris D. Evans, Mark O. Gessner, Hans-Peter Grossart, Külli Kangur, Ilga Kokorite, Pirkko Kortelainen, Hjalmar Laudon, Jouni Lehoranta, Noah Lottig, Don T. Monteith, Peter Nõges, Tiina Nõges, Filip Oulehle, Gunnhild Riise, James A. Rusak, Antti Räike, Janis Sire, Shannon Sterling & Emma Kritzberg
Recent reports of increasing iron (Fe) concentrations in freshwaters are of concern, given the fundamental role of Fe in biogeochemical processes. Still, little is known about the frequency and geographical distribution of Fe trends, or about the underlying drivers. We analyzed temporal trends of Fe concentrations across 340 water bodies distributed over 10 countries in northern Europe and North America in order to gain a clearer understanding of where, to what extent, and why Fe...

Data from: Sexual dimorphism in epicuticular compounds despite similar sexual selection in sex role-reversed seed beetles

Isobel Booksmythe, Howard D. Rundle, Göran Arnqvist, H. D. Rundle, I. Booksmythe & G. Arnqvist
Sexual selection imposed by mating preferences is often implicated in the evolution of both sexual dimorphism and divergence between species in signalling traits. Epicuticular compounds (ECs) are important signalling traits in insects and show extensive variability among and within taxa. Here, we investigate whether variation in the multivariate EC profiles of two sex role-reversed beetle species, Megabruchidius dorsalis and Megabruchidius tonkineus, predicts mate attractiveness and mating success in males and females. The two species had...

Data from: Cope’s rule and the adaptive landscape of dinosaur body size evolution

Roger B. J. Benson, Gene Hunt, Matthew T. Carrano & Nicolás Campione
The largest known dinosaurs weighed at least 20 million times as much as the smallest, indicating exceptional phenotypic divergence. Previous studies have focused on extreme giant sizes, tests of Cope's rule, and miniaturization on the line leading to birds. We use non-uniform macroevolutionary models based on Ornstein–Uhlenbeck and trend processes to unify these observations, asking: what patterns of evolutionary rates, directionality and constraint explain the diversification of dinosaur body mass? We find that dinosaur evolution...

Data from: Evolution of the selfing syndrome: anther orientation and herkogamy together determine reproductive assurance in a self-compatible plant

Per Toräng, Linus Vikström, Jörg Wunder, Stefan Wötzel, George Coupland & Jon Ågren
Capacity for autonomous self-fertilization provides reproductive assurance, has evolved repeatedly in the plant kingdom, and typically involves several changes in flower morphology and development (the selfing syndrome). Yet, the relative importance of different traits and trait combinations for efficient selfing and reproductive success in pollinator-poor environments is poorly known. In a series of experiments, we tested the importance of anther-stigma distance and the less studied trait anther orientation for efficiency of selfing in the perennial...

Data from: Subtle but ubiquitous selection on body size in a natural population of collared flycatchers over 33 years

Mats Björklund & Lars Gustafsson
Understanding the magnitude and long-term patterns of selection in natural populations is of importance, for example, when analyzing the evolutionary impact of climate change. We estimated univariate and multivariate directional, quadratic and correlational selection on four morphological traits (adult wing, tarsus and tail length, body mass) over a time period of 33 years (≈ 19 000 observations) in a nest-box breeding population of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis). In general, selection was weak in both males...

Data from: Ecology, biofacies, biogeography and systematics of micromorphic lingulate brachiopods from the Ordovician (Darriwilian–Sandbian) of south-central China

Lars E. Holmer, Mansoureh Ghobadi Pour, Leonid E. Popov, Zhiliang Zhang & Zhifei Zhang
Ordovician (Darriwilian to Sandbian) micromorphic linguliform lingulate brachiopods are described from the Guniutan Formation at the Fenxiang section in Hubei province, and the Maocaopu and Cili sections in Hunan province of south-central China, situated on the Yangtze Platform. A total of 7560 specimens from 155 limestone samples (within the interval of Lenodus variabilis – Pygodus anserinus biozones) are assigned to 22 species, representing a low taxonomic diversity and low abundance fauna. The fauna is dominated...

Data from: Two extended haplotype blocks are associated with adaptation to high altitude habitats in East African honey bees

Andreas Wallberg, Caspar Schöning, Matthew T Webster, Martin Hasselmann & Matthew T. Webster
Understanding the genetic basis of adaption is a central task in biology. Populations of the honey bee Apis mellifera that inhabit the mountain forests of East Africa differ in behavior and morphology from those inhabiting the surrounding lowland savannahs, which likely reflects adaptation to these habitats. We performed whole genome sequencing on 39 samples of highland and lowland bees from two pairs of populations to determine their evolutionary affinities and identify the genetic basis of...

Data from: Specificity of fungal associations of Pyroleae and Monotropa hypopitys during germination and seedling development

Veronika A Johansson, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Urmas Köljalg & Ove Eriksson
Mycoheterotrophic plants obtain organic carbon from associated mycorrhizal fungi, fully or partially. Angiosperms with this form of nutrition possess exceptionally small 'dust seeds' which after germination develop 'seedlings' that remain subterranean for several years, fully dependent on fungi for supply of carbon. Mycoheterotrophs which as adults have photosynthesis thus develop from full to partial mycoheterotrophy, or autotrophy, during ontogeny. Mycoheterotrophic plants may represent a gradient of variation in a parasitism-mutualism continuum, both among and within...

Data from: High-protein paternal diet confers an advantage to sons in sperm competition

Felix Zajitschek, Susanne Zajitschek & Mollie Manier
Parental environment can widely influence offspring phenotype, but paternal effects in the absence of parental care remain poorly understood. We asked if protein content in the larval diet of fathers affected paternity success and gene expression in their sons. We found that males reared on high-protein diet had sons that fared better during sperm competition, suggesting that postcopulatory sexual selection is subject to transgenerational paternal effects. Moreover, immune response genes were downregulated in sons of...

Data from: A potential pitfall in studies of biological shape: does size matter?

David Outomuro & Frank Johansson
1. The number of published studies using geometric morphometrics (GM) for analysing biological shape has increased steadily since the beginning of the 1990’s, covering multiple research areas such as ecology, evolution, development, taxonomy and palaeontology. Unfortunately, we have observed that many published studies using GM do not evaluate the potential allometric effects of size on shape, which normally require consideration or assessment This might lead to misinterpretations and flawed conclusions in certain cases, especially when...

Data from: A crush on small fungi: an efficient and quick method for obtaining DNA from minute ascomycetes

Henrik Sundberg, Stefan Ekman & Åsa Kruys
1. We have developed a reliable technique for extracting DNA from single microscopic fungal thalli, including efficient cell disruption and transfer of cell content for subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The technique was primarily developed for members of the ascomycete order Laboulbeniales, which are minute fungi with tough cell walls that are exceedingly difficult to disrupt with standard extraction techniques. 2. Our method makes routine amplification of DNA from single thalli possible, even from small...

Data from: The combined effects of temporal autocorrelation and the costs of plasticity on the evolution of plasticity

Mattias Siljestam & Örjan Östman
Adaptive phenotypic plasticity is an important source of intraspecific variation, and for many plastic traits the costs or factors limiting plasticity seem cryptic. However, there are several different factors that may constrain the evolution of plasticity, but few models have considered costs and limiting factors simultaneously. Here we use a simulation model to investigate how the optimal level of plasticity in a population depends on a fixed fitness cost for maintaining a potential for plasticity...

Data from: Reproductive character displacement of female, but not male song discrimination in an avian hybrid zone

David Wheatcroft & Anna Qvarnstrom
Divergence of male sexual signals and female preferences for those signals often maintains reproductive boundaries between closely related, co-occurring species. However, contrasting sources of selection, such as interspecific competition, can lead to weak divergence or even convergence of sexual signals in sympatry. When signals converge, assortative mating can be maintained if the mating preferences of females diverge in sympatry (reproductive character displacement; RCD), but there are few explicit examples. Pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) are sympatric...

Data from: Female fecundity variation affects reproducibility of experiments on host plant preference and acceptance in a phytophagous insect

Alexander Schäpers, Hampus Petrén, Christopher W. Wheat, Christer Wiklund & Magne Friberg
Reproducibility is a scientific cornerstone. Many recent studies, however, describe a reproducibility crisis and call for assessments of reproducibility across scientific domains. Here, we explore the reproducibility of a classic ecological experiment—that of assessing female host plant preference and acceptance in phytophagous insects, a group in which host specialization is a key driver of diversification. We exposed multiple cohorts of Pieris napi butterflies from the same population to traditional host acceptance and preference tests on...

Data from: Direct and pollinator-mediated effects of herbivory on strawberry and the potential for improved resistance

Anne Muola, Daniela Weber, Lisa E. Malm, Paul A. Egan, Robert Glinwood, Amy L. Parachnowitsch & Johan A. Stenberg
The global decline in pollinators has partly been blamed on pesticides, leading some to propose pesticide-free farming as an option to improve pollination. However, herbivores are likely to be more prevalent in pesticide-free environments, requiring knowledge of their effects on pollinators, and alternative crop protection strategies to mitigate any potential pollination reduction. Strawberry leaf beetles (SLB) Galerucella spp. are important strawberry pests in Northern Europe and Russia. Given that SLB attack both leaf and flower...

Data from: Childhood adiposity and type 1 diabetes: a Mendelian randomization study

J. C. Censin, Christoph Nowak, Nicholas Cooper, Peter Bergsten, John A. Todd & Tove Fall
BACKGROUND: The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasing globally. One hypothesis is that increasing childhood obesity rates may explain part of this increase, but, as T1D is rare, intervention studies are challenging to perform. The aim of this study was to assess this hypothesis with a Mendelian randomization approach that uses genetic variants as instrumental variables to test for causal associations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We created a genetic instrument of 23 single nucleotide...

Data from: The evolutionary origin of variation in song length and frequency in the avian family Cettiidae

Chentao Wei, Trevor D. Price, Jiayu Liu, Per Alström & Yanyun Zhang
Aspects of bird song have been shown to correlate with morphological and ecological features, including beak and body size, and habitat. Here we study evolution of song length and song frequency among 30 species belonging to the Cettiidae. Frequency is negatively correlated with body size, and song length increases with latitude. Although migration distance correlates with latitude, the association of song length with latitude is only present within the non-migratory species, implying the association is...

Data from: Evolution of brain region volumes during artificial selection for relative brain size

Alexander Kotrschal, Hong-Li Zeng, Wouter Van Der Bijl, Caroline Öhman-Mägi, Kurt Kotrschal, Kristiaan Pelckmans & Niclas Kolm
The vertebrate brain shows an extremely conserved layout across taxa. Still, the relative sizes of separate brain regions vary markedly between species. One interesting pattern is that larger brains seem associated with increased relative sizes only of certain brain regions, for instance telencephalon and cerebellum. Till now, the evolutionary association between separate brain regions and overall brain size is based on comparative evidence and remains experimentally untested. Here we test the evolutionary response of brain...

Data from: Climate and anthropogenic factors determine site occupancy in Scotland's Northern-range badger population: implications of context-dependent responses under environmental change

André P. Silva, Gonçalo Curveira-Santos, Kerry Kilshaw, Chris Newman, David W. Macdonald, Luciana G. Simões & Luís M. Rosalino
Aim In the light of human-induced rapid environmental change (HIREC), populations are exposed to ever-greater bioclimatic stress at the edge of a species’ historic range. The distribution dynamics of European badgers (Meles meles) at their southern edge are linked tightly to climatic variability. We contribute critical data on how climatic context and local factors determine site occupancy in a northern-range population. Location Eleven study areas (averaging ~21.3 km2) spread over ~50,000 km2 in Northern Scotland....

Data from: The relationship between plumage colouration, problem-solving and learning performance in great tits Parus major

Laure Cauchard, Stéphanie M. Doucet, Neeltje J. Boogert, Bernard Angers & Blandine Doligez
Recent studies suggest that individuals with better problem-solving and/or learning performance have greater reproductive success, and that individuals may thus benefit from choosing mates based on these performances. However, directly assessing these performances in candidate mates could be difficult. Instead, the use of indirect cues related to problem-solving and/or learning performance, such as condition-dependent phenotypic traits, might be favored. We investigated whether problem-solving and learning performance on a novel non-foraging task correlated with sexually selected...

Data from: Experience buffers extrinsic mortality in a group-living bird species

Michael Griesser, Emeline Mourocq, Jonathan Barnaby, Katharine Bowegen, Sönke Eggers, Kevin Fletcher, Radoslav Kozma, Franziska Kurz, Anssi Laurila, Magdalena Nystrand, Enrico Sorato, Jan Ekman & Katharine M. Bowgen
Extrinsic mortality has a strong impact on the evolution of life-histories, prey morphology and behavioural adaptations, but for many animals the causes of mortality are poorly understood. Predation is an important driver of extrinsic mortality and mobile animals form groups in response to increased predation risk. Furthermore, in many species juveniles suffer higher mortality than older individuals, which may reflect a lower phenotypic quality, lower competitiveness, or a lack of antipredator or foraging skills. Here...

Data from: Reproductive trade-offs in a long-lived bird species: condition-dependent reproductive allocation maintains female survival and offspring quality

Michael Griesser, Gretchen F. Wagner, Szymon M. Drobniak, Jan Ekman, M. Griesser, G. F. Wagner, S. M. Drobniak & J. Ekman
Life-history theory is an essential framework to understand the evolution of reproductive allocation. It predicts that individuals of long-lived species favour their own survival over current reproduction, leading individuals to refrain from reproducing under harsh conditions. Here we test this prediction in a long-lived bird species, the Siberian jay Perisoreus infaustus. Long-term data revealed that females rarely refrain from breeding, but lay smaller clutches in unfavourable years. Neither offspring body size, female survival nor offspring...

Data from: Mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 and dental aberrations in children and adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta - a retrospective cohort study

Kristofer Andersson, Göran Dahllöf, Katarina Lindahl, Andreas Kindmark, Giedre Grigelioniene, Eva Åström & Barbro Malmgren
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of connective tissue, caused mainly by mutations in the collagen I genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2). Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and other dental aberrations are common features of OI. We investigated the association between collagen I mutations and DGI, taurodontism, and retention of permanent second molars in a retrospective cohort of 152 unrelated children and adolescents with OI. The clinical examination included radiographic evaluations. Teeth from 81 individuals...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    53

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    53

Affiliations

  • Uppsala University
    53
  • Lund University
    5
  • University of Zurich
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • Stockholm University
    4
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • University of Sydney
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Northwest University
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • University of East Anglia
    2
  • University of Bern
    2
  • University of Toronto
    2
  • University of Tartu
    2