93 Works

Measurements of microarthropod community structure and diversity from an upland grassland experimental site [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

L. Cole, R.D. Bardgett & S.M. Buckland
Data comprises patterns of diversity in a below-ground community of microarthropods (mites and collembola), measured during a nutrient (calcium and nitrogen) manipulation experiment, located at the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Soil Biodiversity Site in Sourhope, Scotland, UK. Data collected include abundance of microarthropods, and also microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, wet pH using de-ionised water, soil loss on ignition, dry root biomass, total carbon and nitrogen content of soil and roots and soil moisture...

Litterfall production in human-modified forests of Eastern Amazonia

E. Berenguer, L. C. Rossi, M.M.M. Seixas & J. Barlow
This dataset includes measurements of litter in 20 plots (250 x 10 m each) in the Brazilian Amazon. Study plots were distributed across a gradient of forest disturbance, including: undisturbed primary forests , logged primary forests, logged-and-burned primary forests, and secondary forests. Data were collected from January 2015 until October 2018. In December 2015, during the El Niño-mediated drought, eight of our study plots were affected by understory fires.

Plant and soil animal diversity measurements from a disturbance and nitrogen addition experiment in an upland grassland site [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

L. Cole, R.D. Bardgett, S.M. Buckland & G. Burt-Smith
Data comprises abundance measures of mites, collembola and plant biomass collected from a field experiment based at Sourhope. Experimental plots varied in nitrogen addition treatment and level of ground disturbance. The data were collected as a component of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the...

Fine root production in human-modified forests of Eastern Amazonia

E. Berenguer, L. C. Rossi, M.M.M. Seixas & J. Barlow
This dataset includes measurements of soil respiration in 20 plots (250 x 10 m each) in the Brazilian Amazon. Study plots were distributed across a gradient of forest disturbance, including: undisturbed primary forests , logged primary forests, logged-and-burned primary forests, and secondary forests. Data were collected from October 2014 until May 2018. In December 2015, during the El Niño-mediated drought, eight of our study plots were affected by understory fires.

Soil nutrient data from Winklebury Hill, UK, in 2014

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell, J.M. Bullock & S. Oakley
This dataset contains nutrient data from soils and microbial biomass in soils from an experiment based at Winklebury Hill, UK. The experiment used seeds and plug plants to create different plant communities on the bare chalk on Winklebury Hill and tested the resulting carbon and nutrient cycling rates and compared these to the characteristics of different plant functional groups. The experiment ran from 2013 to 2016 and this dataset contains data from 2014 only. This...

Atmospheric gas and vegetation survey data from Winklebury Hill, UK, in 2014

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell, J.M. Bullock & S. Oakley
This dataset contains greenhouse gas flux data and vegetation survey data from an experiment based at Winklebury Hill, UK. The vegetation survey comprises total species percentage cover and species richness data from four 50 cm by 50 cm quadrats. The greenhouse gas flux data comprises net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange, photosynthesis and respiration data measured with an Infra-red Gas Analyser (IRGA); methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide data measured using gas chromatography; and nitrate and...

Data from: Relationships between plant traits, soil properties and carbon fluxes differ between monocultures and mixed communities in temperate grassland

Jonathan R. De Long, Benjamin G. Jackson, Anna Wilkinson, William J. Pritchard, Simon Oakley, Kelly E. Mason, Jörg G. Stephan, Nicholas J. Ostle, David Johnson, Elizabeth M. Baggs & Richard D. Bardgett
1. The use of plant traits to predict ecosystem functions has been gaining growing attention. Aboveground plant traits, such as leaf nitrogen (N) content and specific leaf area (SLA), have been shown to strongly relate to ecosystem productivity, respiration, and nutrient cycling. Further, increasing plant functional trait diversity has been suggested as a possible mechanism to increase ecosystem carbon (C) storage. However, it is uncertain whether belowground plant traits can be predicted by aboveground traits,...

Ecosystem function and vegetation data from a land use gradient on Salisbury Plain in June 2014

E.L. Fry, J. Savage, W.J. Pritchard, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell & J.M. Bullock
This dataset contains ecosystem function and vegetation survey data from soils collected from Salisbury Plain, UK. The sites were selected to reflect the four main grassland management types on Salisbury Plain ranging from arable cropland to species rich grassland, with six representative grassland plots for each type (24 sites in total). Each site had four replicates for each variable measured. The data collected was intended to illustrate a gradient of ecosystem functioning and vegetation change...

A large-scale assessment of plant dispersal mode and seed traits across human-modified Amazonian forests

Joseph Hawes, Ima Vieira, Luiz Magnago, Erika Berenguer, Joice Ferreira, Luiz Aragão, Amanda Cardoso, Alexander Lees, Gareth Lennox, Joseph Tobias, Anthony Waldron & Jos Barlow
1. Quantifying the impact of habitat disturbance on ecosystem function is critical for understanding and predicting the future of tropical forests. Many studies have examined post-disturbance changes in animal traits related to mutualistic interactions with plants, but the effect of disturbance on plant traits in diverse forests has received much less attention. 2. Focusing on two study regions in the eastern Brazilian Amazon, we used a trait-based approach to examine how seed dispersal functionality within...

Data from: Transgenerational effects modulate density-dependent prophylactic resistance to viral infection in a lepidopteran pest

Kenneth Wilson, Robert I. Graham, R. I. Graham & K. Wilson
There is an increasing appreciation of the importance of transgenerational effects on offspring fitness, including in relation to immune function and disease resistance. Here, we assess the impact of parental rearing density on offspring resistance to viral challenge in an insect species expressing density-dependent prophylaxis (DDP); i.e. the adaptive increase in resistance or tolerance to pathogen infection in response to crowding. We quantified survival rates in larvae of the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis) from either...

Data from: Plant, soil and microbial controls on grassland diversity restoration: a long-term, multi-site mesocosm experiment

Ellen L. Fry, Emma S. Pilgrim, Jerry R.B. Tallowin, Roger S. Smith, Simon R. Mortimer, Deborah A. Beaumont, Janet Simkin, Stephanie J. Harris, Robert S. Shiel, Helen Quirk, Kate A. Harrison, Clare S. Lawson, Phil A. Hobbs & Richard D. Bardgett
The success of grassland biodiversity restoration schemes is determined by many factors; as such their outcomes can be unpredictable. There is a need for improved understanding of the relative importance of belowground factors to restoration success, such as contrasting soil type and management intensities, as well as plant community composition and order of assembly. We carried out an eight-year mesocosm experiment across three locations in the UK to explore the relative and interactive roles of...

Data from: Mesoclosures – increasing realism in mesocosm studies of ecosystem functioning

Saija Lähteenmäki, Eleanor M. Slade, Bess Hardwick, Gustavo Schiffler, Júlio Louzada, Jos Barlow & Tomas Roslin
1. Experimental studies linking community composition to functioning are typically confined to small and closed micro- or mesocosms. Such restricted conditions may affect both species’ biology and their environment. Yet, targeting simple features in the behaviour of species may circumvent these constraints. Focusing on ecological functions provided by dung beetles, we test whether large, open-top cages – MESOCLOSURES – will intercept the flight trajectories of beetles, thereby allowing manipulation of local community composition. 2. MESOCLOSURES...

Data from: Little impact of over-winter parasitism on a free-ranging ungulate in the high Arctic

Anja M. Carlsson, Steve D. Albon, Stephen J. Coulson, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Ken Wilson, Leif Egil Loe, Vebjørn Veiberg, R. Justin Irvine, Anja Morven Carlsson, Kenneth Wilson & Robert Justin Irvine
1.Macroparasites have a central place in wildlife ecology because they have the potential to regulate host populations through effects on reproduction and/or survival. However, there remains a paucity of studies that have demonstrated the regulatory role of these parasites in free-ranging animals. 2.Previous work on Svalbard reindeer demonstrated that the experimental removal of the parasitic gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia gruehneri transmitted in summer, improved reindeer fecundity, and that the species was capable of mediating a density-dependent...

Data from: On potential ocular artefacts in infant electroencephalogram: a reply to comments by Köster

Dora Kampis, Eugenio Parise, Gergely Csibra & Ágnes M. Kovács
Dataset for Kampis, Parise, Csibra, & Kovacs (2016)EEG Dataset for article "On potential ocular artifacts in infant EEG: A reply to comments by Köster"dataset_reply_to_comment_procb_kampisetal.xls

Data from: Endemic infection reduces transmission potential of an epidemic parasite during co-infection

Joanna Randall, Joanne Cable, Irina A. Guschina, John L. Harwood, Joanne Lello, J. Cable, I. A. Guschina, J. L. Harwood, J. Lello & J. Randall
Endemic, low-virulence parasitic infections are common in nature. Such infections may deplete host resources, which in turn could affect the reproduction of other parasites during co-infection. We aimed to determine whether the reproduction, and therefore transmission potential, of an epidemic parasite was limited by energy costs imposed on the host by an endemic infection. Total lipids, triacylglycerols (TAG) and polar lipids were measured in cockroaches (Blattella germanica) that were fed ad libitum, starved or infected...

Data from: Mass extinctions over the last 500 myr: an astronomical cause?

Anatoly D. Erlykin, David A. T. Harper, Terry Sloan & Arnold W. Wolfendale
A Fourier analysis of the magnitudes and timing of the Phanerozoic mass extinctions (MEs) demonstrates that many of the periodicities claimed in other analyses are not statistically significant. Moreover we show that the periodicities associated with oscillations of the Solar System about the galactic plane are too irregular to give narrow peaks in the Fourier periodograms. This leads us to conclude that, apart from possibly a small number of major events, astronomical causes for MEs...

Data from: The value of trophic interactions for ecosystem function: dung beetle communities influence seed burial and seedling recruitment in tropical forests

Hannah M. Griffiths, Richard D. Bardgett, Julio Louzada & Jos Barlow
Anthropogenic activities are causing species extinctions, raising concerns about the consequences of changing biological communities for ecosystem functioning. To address this, we investigated how dung beetle communities influence seed burial and seedling recruitment in the Brazilian Amazon. First, we conducted a burial and retrieval experiment using seed mimics. We found that dung beetle biomass had a stronger positive effect on the burial of large than small beads, suggesting that anthropogenic reductions in large-bodied beetles will...

Data from: Dynamics of macronutrient self-medication and illness-induced anorexia in virally-infected insects

Sonia Povey, Kenneth Wilson, Sheena C. Cotter & Stephen J. Simpson
1. Some animals change their feeding behaviour when infected with parasites, seeking out substances that enhance their ability to overcome infection. This “self-medication” is typically considered to involve the consumption of toxins, minerals or secondary compounds. However, recent studies have shown that macronutrients can influence the immune response, and that pathogen-challenged individuals can self-medicate by choosing a diet rich in protein and low in carbohydrates. Infected individuals might also reduce food intake when infected (i.e....

Data from: Bacterial communities associated with honeybee food stores are correlated with land use

Philip Donkersley, Glenn Rhodes, Roger W. Pickup, Kevin C. Jones & Kenneth Wilson
Microbial communities, associated with almost all metazoans, can be inherited from the environment. Although the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) gut microbiome is well documented, studies of the gut focus on just a small component of the bee microbiome. Other key areas such as the comb, propolis, honey, and stored pollen (bee bread) are poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the relationship between the pollinator microbiome and its environment. Here we present a study of...

Data from: Understanding willingness to use oral pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men in China

Xia Wang, Adam Bourne, Pulin Liu, Jiangli Sun, Thomas Cai, Gitau Mburu, Matteo Cassolato, Bangyuan Wang & Wang Zhou
Background: Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as an additional prevention choice for men who have sex with men (MSM) at substantial risk of HIV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent, and reasons, for MSM’s willingness to use oral PrEP in Wuhan and Shanghai, China. Methods: Between May and December 2015, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 487 MSM recruited through snowball sampling in physical locations frequented by MSM and through...

Data from: Scaling up effects of measures mitigating pollinator loss from local- to landscape-level population responses

David Kleijn, Theo E. W. Linders, Anthonie Stip, Jacobus C. Biesmeijer, Felix L. Wäckers & Tibor Bukovinszky
1. Declining pollinator populations have caused concern about consequences for food production, and have initiated an increasing number of initiatives that aim to mitigate pollinator loss through enhancement of floral resources. Studies evaluating effects of mitigation measures generally demonstrate positive responses of pollinators to floral resource enhancement. However, it remains unclear whether this represents landscape-level population effects or results from a spatial redistribution of individuals from otherwise unaffected populations. 2. Here we present a method...

Data from: Nutrient limitation of woody debris decomposition in a tropical forest: contrasting effects of N and P addition

Yao Chen, Emma J. Sayer, Zhian Li, Qifeng Mo, Yingwen Li, Yongzhen Ding, Jun Wang, Xiankai Lu, Jianwu Tang & Faming Wang
Tropical forests represent a major terrestrial store of carbon (C), a large proportion of which is contained in the soil and decaying organic matter. Woody debris plays a key role in forest C dynamics because it contains a sizeable proportion of total forest C. Understanding the factors controlling the decomposition of organic matter in general, and woody debris in particular, is hence critical to assessing changes in tropical C storage. We conducted a factorial fertilization...

Measures of peatland carbon cycling from peat mesocosm incubation experiments

H. Richardson, S. Waldron, J. Whitaker & N. Ostle
Data from two laboratory-based studies, both investigating the interactive effects of abiotic and biotic controls on peatland carbon cycling. Data comprise carbon dioxide and methane fluxes in peat, litter mass remaining and respiration rate data from litter bags on peat mesocosms, and biochemical and physical properties of peat. Data was collected in from the first laboratory study, which focused on identifying the interactive effects of small-scale temperature change, water table level and plant functional type...

Field measurements of peatland carbon cycling at a wind farm hosting peatland in Scotland, UK

A. Armstrong, H. Richardson, S. Waldron, N.J. Ostle & J. Whitaker
Data from a field-based investigation into the spatio-temporal variability of abiotic and biotic controls on peatland carbon cycling. Data was collected between February 2011 and April 2013, across an area of blanket bog peatland at Black Law Wind Farm, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Plant-soil properties data includes total carbon content, total nitrogen content and carbon to nitrogen ratio of vegetation, litter and peat, carbon and nitrogen stock for litter and peat, bulk density, soil moisture content, pH...

Ecosystem function and vegetation data from Parsonage Down, UK, in 2013

E.L. Fry, A.L. Hall, J. Savage, R.D. Bardgett, N. Ostle, R.F. Pywell & J.M. Bullock
This dataset contains vegetation survey data and nitrate and ammonium concentrations, microbial biomass data, particle size, and nitrification and mineralisation rates within soils from an experiment based at Parsonage Down, UK. The vegetation survey comprises total species percentage cover and species richness data from four 50 cm by 50 cm quadrats. The experiment investigated the effect of different plant groups on soil carbon stores and nutrient cycling, by using a mixture of hand weeding and...

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