8 Works

Data from: Rates of genomic divergence in humans, chimpanzees and their lice

Kevin P. Johnson, Julie M. Allen, Brett P. Olds, Lawrence Mugisha, David L. Reed, Ken N. Paige, Barry R. Pittendrigh, B. P. Olds, J. M. Allen, K. N. Paige, D. L. Reed & L. Mugisha
The rate of DNA mutation and divergence is highly variable across the tree of life. However, the reasons underlying this variation are not well understood. Comparing the rates of genetic changes between hosts and parasite lineages that diverged at the same time is one way to begin to understand differences in genetic mutation and substitution rates. Such studies have indicated that the rate of genetic divergence in parasites is often faster than that of their...

Data from: Social environment influences the relationship between genotype and gene expression in wild baboons

Daniel E. Runcie, Ralph T. Wiedmann, Elizabeth A. Archie, Jeanne Altmann, Gregory A. Wray, Susan C. Alberts, Jenny Tung, S. C. Alberts, D. E. Runcie, J. Tung, G. A. Wray, J. Altmann & E. A. Archie
Variation in the social environment can have profound effects on survival and reproduction in wild social mammals. However, we know little about the degree to which these effects are influenced by genetic differences among individuals, and conversely, the degree to which social environmental variation mediates genetic reaction norms. To better understand these relationships, we investigated the potential for dominance rank, social connectedness and group size to modify the effects of genetic variation on gene expression...

Data from: Genetic divergence along the speciation continuum: the transition from host race to species in Rhagoletis (Diptera: Tephritdae)

Thomas H. Q. Powell, Glen R. Hood, Mason O. Murphy, Jeffrey S. Heilveil, Stewart H. Berlocher, Partrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder & Patrik Nosil
Studies of related populations varying in their degrees of reproductive isolation can provide insights into speciation. Here, the transition from partially isolated host races to more fully separated sibling species is investigated by comparing patterns of genetic differentiation between recently evolved (∼150 generations) apple and ancestral hawthorn-infesting populations of Rhagoletis pomonella to their sister taxon, the undescribed flowering dogwood fly attacking Cornus florida. No fixed or diagnostic private alleles differentiating the three populations were found...

Data from: Ecological adaptation and reproductive isolation in sympatry: genetic and phenotypic evidence for native host races of Rhagoletis pomonella

Thomas H. Q. Powell, Andrew A. Forbes, Glen R. Hood & Jeffrey L. Feder
Ecological speciation-with-gene-flow may be an important mode of diversification for phytophagous insects. The recent shift of Rhagoletis pomonella from its native host downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to introduced apple (Malus domestica) in the northeastern United States is a classic example of sympatric host race formation. Here, we test whether R. pomonella has similarly formed host races on four native Crataegus species in the southern United States: western mayhaw (C. opaca), blueberry hawthorn (C. brachyacantha), southern...

Data from: Evidence for a recent horizontal transmission and spatial spread of Wolbachia from endemic Rhagoletis cerasi (Diptera: Tephritidae) to invasive Rhagoletis cingulata in Europe

Hannes Schuler, Coralie Bertheau, Scott P. Egan, Jeffrey L. Feder, Markus Riegler, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Florian M. Steiner, Jes Johannesen, Peter Kern, Katalin Tuba, Ferenc Lakatos, Kirsten Köppler, Wolfgang Arthofer & Christian Stauffer
The widespread occurrence of Wolbachia in arthropods and nematodes suggests that this intracellular, maternally inherited endosymbiont has the ability to cross species boundaries. However, direct evidence for such a horizontal transmission of Wolbachia in nature is scarce. Here, we compare the well-characterized Wolbachia infection of the European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi, with that of the North American eastern cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cingulata, recently introduced to Europe. Molecular genetic analysis of Wolbachia based on...

Data from: Antagonistic relationships between intron content and codon usage bias of genes in three mosquito species: functional and evolutionary implications

Susanta K. Behura, Brajendra K. Singh & David W. Severson
Genome biology of mosquitoes holds potential in developing knowledge-based control strategies against vector-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue, West Nile Virus and others. Although the genomes of three major vector mosquitoes have been sequenced, attempts to elucidate the relationship between intron and codon usage bias across species in phylogenetic contexts are limited. In this study, we investigated the relationship between intron content and codon bias of orthologous genes among three vector mosquito species. We found...

Data from: Genetic hitchhiking and the dynamic buildup of genomic divergence during speciation with gene flow

Samuel Melvin Flaxman, Jeffrey L. Feder, Patrik Nosil, Samuel Melvin Flaxman, Jeffrey L. Feder, Patrik Nosil & Samuel M. Flaxman
A major issue in evolutionary biology is explaining patterns of differentiation observed in population genomic data, as divergence can be due to both direct selection on a locus and genetic hitchhiking. “Divergence hitchhiking” (DH) theory postulates that divergent selection on a locus reduces gene flow at physically linked sites, facilitating the formation of localized clusters of tightly linked, diverged loci. “Genome hitchhiking” (GH) theory emphasizes genome-wide effects of divergent selection. Past theoretical investigations of DH...

Data from: Experimental evidence for ecological selection on genome variation in the wild

Zachariah Gompert, Aaron A. Comeault, Timothy E. Farkas, Jeffery L. Feder, Thomas L. Parchman, Alex C. Buerkle, Patrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder & C. Alex Buerkle
Understanding natural selection's effect on genetic variation is a major goal in biology, but the genome-scale consequences of contemporary selection are not well known. In a release and recapture field experiment we transplanted stick insects to native and novel host plants and directly measured allele frequency changes within a generation at 186 576 genetic loci. We observed substantial, genome-wide allele frequency changes during the experiment, most of which could be attributed to random mortality (genetic...

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