19 Works

Data from: Sexual conflict and interacting phenotypes: a quantitative genetic analysis of fecundity and copula duration in Drosophila melanogaster

Dominic Alexander Edward, Jocelyn Poissant, Alastair J. Wilson, Tracey Chapman & Dominic A. Edward
Many reproductive traits that have evolved under sexual conflict may be influenced by both sexes. Investigation of the genetic architecture of such traits can yield important insight into their evolution, but this entails that the heritable component of variation is estimated for males and females – as an interacting phenotype. We address the lack of research in this area through an investigation of egg production and copula duration in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Despite...

Data from: Extreme cost of rivalry in a monandrous species: male–male interactions result in failure to acquire mates and reduced longevity

Anne Lizé, Thomas A. R. Price, Chloe Heys, Zenobia Lewis, Gregory D. D. Hurst, C. Heys, G. D. D. Hurst, Z. Lewis, A. Lize & T. A. R. Price
Mating system variation is profound in animals. In insects, female willingness to remate varies from mating with hundreds of males (extreme polyandry) to never remating (monandry). This variation in female behaviour is predicted to affect the pattern of selection on males, with intense pre-copulatory sexual selection under monandry compared to a mix of pre- and post-copulatory forces affecting fitness under polyandry. We tested the hypothesis that differences in female mating biology would be reflected in...

Data from: The heritability of mating behaviour in a fly and its plasticity in response to the threat of sperm competition

Amanda J. Bretman, Anne Lizé, Craig A. Walling, Tom A. R. Price & Amanda Bretman
Phenotypic plasticity is a key mechanism by which animals can cope with rapidly changeable environments, but the evolutionary lability of such plasticity remains unclear. The socio-sexual environment can fluctuate very rapidly, affecting both the frequency of mating opportunities and the level of competition males may face. Males of many species show plastic behavioural responses to changes in social environment, in particular the presence of rival males. For example, Drosophila pseudoobscura males respond to rivals by...

Woodlands survey flora data 1971-2001

K.J. Kirby, S.M. Smart, H.I.J. Black, R.G.H. Bunce, P.M. Corney, R.J. Smithers & M.W. Shaw
This dataset consists of the vascular plants, bryophytes and lichens recorded in plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001).

Data from: Can maternally inherited endosymbionts adapt to a novel host? Direct costs of Spiroplasma infection, but not vertical transmission efficiency, evolve rapidly after horizontal transfer into D. melanogaster

Satoshi Nakayama, Steven R. Parratt, Kate J. Hutchence, Zenobia Lewis, Tom A. R. Price & Gregory D. D. Hurst
Maternally inherited symbionts are common in arthropods and many have important roles in host adaptation. The observation that specific symbiont lineages infect distantly related host species implies new interactions are commonly established by lateral transfer events. However, studies have shown that symbionts often perform poorly in novel hosts. We hypothesized selection on the symbiont may be sufficiently rapid that poor performance in a novel host environment is rapidly ameliorated, permitting symbiont maintenance. Here, we test...

Data from: Hybridization facilitates evolutionary rescue

Rike B. Stelkens, Michael A. Brockhurst, Gregory D. D. Hurst & Duncan Greig
The resilience of populations to rapid environmental degradation is a major concern for biodiversity conservation. When environments deteriorate to lethal levels, species must evolve to adapt to the new conditions to avoid extinction. Here, we test the hypothesis that evolutionary rescue may be enabled by hybridization, because hybridization increases genetic variability. Using experimental evolution, we show that interspecific hybrid populations of Saccharomyces yeast adapt to grow in more highly degraded environments than intraspecific and parental...

Data from: The effect of hybrid transgression on environmental tolerance in experimental yeast crosses

Rike B. Stelkens, Mike A. Brockhurst, Gregory D. D. Hurst, Eric L. Miller, Duncan Greig, R. B. Stelkens, G. D. D. Hurst, M. A. Brockhurst, E. L. Miller & D. Greig
Evidence is rapidly accumulating that hybridization generates adaptive variation. Transgressive segregation in hybrids could promote the colonization of new environments. Here, we use an assay to select hybrid genotypes that can proliferate in environmental conditions beyond the conditions tolerated by their parents, and we directly compete them against parental genotypes in habitats across environmental clines. We made 45 different hybrid swarms by crossing yeast strains (both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. paradoxus) with different genetic and...

Data from: Cross-cultural variation in men’s preference for sexual dimorphism in women’s faces

Mikhail V. Kozlov, Huajian Cai, Jorge Contreras-Garduño, Barnaby J. Dixson, Gavita A. Oana, Gwenaël Kaminski, Norman P. Li, Minna T. Lyons, Ike E. Onyishi, Keshav Prasai, Farid Pazhoohi, Pavol Prokop, Sandra L. Rosales Cardozo, Nicolle Sydney, Jose C. Yong, Markus J. Rantala, B. J. Dixson, M. V. Kozlov, U. M. Marcinkowska, M. J. Rantala, H. Cai, M. T. Lyons, N. P. Li, J. C. Yong & J. Contreras-Garduno
Both attractiveness judgements and mate preferences vary considerably cross-culturally. We investigated whether men's preference for femininity in women's faces varies between 28 countries with diverse health conditions by analysing responses of 1972 heterosexual participants. Although men in all countries preferred feminized over masculinized female faces, we found substantial differences between countries in the magnitude of men's preferences. Using an average femininity preference for each country, we found men's facial femininity preferences correlated positively with the...

Data from: The trophic vacuum and the evolution of complex life cycles in trophically-transmitted helminths

Daniel P. Benesh, James C. Chubb, Geoff A. Parker, D. P. Benesh, J. C. Chubb & G. A. Parker
Parasitic worms (helminths) frequently have complex life cycles in which they are transmitted trophically between two or more successive hosts. Sexual reproduction often takes place in high trophic-level (TL) vertebrates, where parasites can grow to large sizes with high fecundity. Direct infection of high TL hosts, while advantageous, may be unachievable for parasites constrained to transmit trophically, because helminth propagules are unlikely to be ingested by large predators. Lack of niche overlap between propagule and...

Woodlands survey site information 1971-2001

K.J. Kirby, S.M. Smart, H.I.J. Black, R.G.H. Bunce, P.M. Corney, R.J. Smithers & M.W. Shaw
The dataset consists of slope, aspect, locations, descriptions and habitat categories from plots and sites in 103 woodlands surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001).

Woodlands survey soil data 1971-2001

K.J. Kirby, S.M. Smart, H.I.J. Black, R.G.H. Bunce, P.M. Corney, R.J. Smithers & M.W. Shaw
The dataset consists of pH, Loss on ignition (Soil organic matter) measurements and soil group information taken from soil samples from plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001).

Woodlands survey tree diameter data 1971-2001

K.J. Kirby, S.M. Smart, H.I.J. Black, R.G.H. Bunce, P.M. Corney, R.J. Smithers & M.W. Shaw
The dataset consists of diameter at breast height (DBH) measurements taken from trees and shrubs recorded in plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001).

Data from: A rapid and cost-effective quantitative microsatellite genotyping protocol to estimate intraspecific competition in protist microcosm experiments

Ewan J. A. Minter, Chris D. Lowe, Michael A. Brockhurst & Phillip C. Watts
High levels of intra-specific variation are commonly observed in natural microbial populations, yet the consequences of this variation for ecological and evolutionary processes remains poorly understood. Protists are excellent experimental models for investigating fundamental and applied questions in ecology and evolution, but studying intra-specific variation remains a challenge due to a lack of molecular resources to aid in quantifying and distinguishing strains during experiments. Here we present a molecular method, quantitative microsatellite genotyping, to accurately...

Data from: Coevolutionary dynamics of polyandry and sex-linked meiotic drive

Luke Holman, Thomas A. R. Price, Nina Wedell & Hanna Kokko
Segregation distorters located on sex chromosomes are predicted to sweep to fixation and cause extinction via a shortage of one sex, but in nature they are often found at low, stable frequencies. One potential resolution to this long-standing puzzle involves female multiple mating (polyandry). Because many meiotic drivers severely reduce the sperm competitive ability of their male carriers, females are predicted to evolve more frequent polyandry and thereby promote sperm competition when a meiotic driver...

Data from: An immunological marker of tolerance to infection in wild rodents

Joseph A. Jackson, Amy J. Hall, Ida M. Friberg, Catriona Ralli, Anne Lowe, Malgorzata Zawadzka, Andrew K. Turner, Alexander Stewart, Richard J. Birtles, Steve Paterson, Janette E. Bradley, Mike Begon & Ann Lowe
Hosts are likely to respond to parasitic infections by a combination of resistance (expulsion of pathogens) and tolerance (active mitigation of pathology). Of these strategies, the basis of tolerance in animal hosts is relatively poorly understood, with especially little known about how tolerance is manifested in natural populations. We monitored a natural population of field voles using longitudinal and cross-sectional sampling modes and taking measurements on body condition, infection, immune gene expression, and survival. Using...

Data from: Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and function: a meta-analysis

Raj Whitlock
1. Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity. 2. Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures...

Data from: Burning for biodiversity: highly resilient ant communities respond only to strongly contrasting fire regimes in Australia’s seasonal tropics

Alan N. Andersen, Relena R. Ribbons, Magen Pettit & Catherine L. Parr
1. According to the pyrodiversity paradigm, a wide range of fire regimes is required to maintain biodiversity in fire-prone landscapes. However, the requisite level of pyrodiversity has seldom been tested and may actually be very low. 2. Here, we examine the sensitivity of tropical savanna ants to variation in fire regimes using results from a long-term fire experiment near Darwin, Australia. Six experimental fire regimes, with varying fire frequency and seasonality, have been applied to...

Data from: Using social parasitism to test reproductive skew models in a primitively eusocial wasp

Jonathan P. Green, Michael A. Cant, Jeremy Field, M. A. Cant, J. Field & J. P. Green
Remarkable variation exists in the distribution of reproduction (skew) among members of cooperatively breeding groups, both within and between species. Reproductive skew theory has provided an important framework for understanding this variation. In the primitively eusocial Hymenoptera, two models have been routinely tested: concessions models, which assume complete control of reproduction by a dominant individual, and tug-of-war models, which assume on-going competition among group members over reproduction. Current data provide little support for either model,...

Data from: Population genomics of the killer whale indicates ecotype evolution in sympatry involving both selection and drift

Andre E. Moura, John G. Kenny, Roy Chaudhuri, Margaret A. Hughes, Andreanna Welch, Ryan R. Reisinger, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Marilyn E. Dahlheim, Neil Hall, A. Rus Hoelzel & Andreanna J. Welch
The evolution of diversity in the marine ecosystem is poorly understood, given the relatively high potential for connectivity, especially for highly mobile species such as whales and dolphins. The killer whale (Orcinus orca) has a worldwide distribution, and individual social groups travel over a wide geographic range. Even so, regional populations have been shown to be genetically differentiated, including among different foraging specialists (ecotypes) in sympatry. Given the strong matrifocal social structure of this species...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • University of Liverpool
    19
  • The Nature Conservancy
    4
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    4
  • University of Exeter
    4
  • Woodland Trust
    4
  • University of York
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology
    3
  • University College London
    2
  • University of Sussex
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1