76 Works

Data from: A neural mechanism underlying failure of optimal choice with multiple alternatives

Bolton K H Chau, Nils Kolling, Laurence T Hunt, Mark E Walton & Matthew F S Rushworth
Despite widespread interest in neural mechanisms of decision-making, most investigations focus on decisions between just two options. Here we adapt a biophysically plausible model of decision-making to predict how a key decision variable, the value difference signal—encoding how much better one choice is than another—changes with the value of a third, but unavailable, alternative. The model predicts a surprising failure of optimal decision-making: greater difficulty choosing between two options in the presence of a third...

Mark-Release-Recapture data showing moth and dung beetle movements in riparian reserves within the SAFE project landscape, Malaysian Borneo, 2016-17

R.E.J. Gray, E.M. Slade, A.Y.C. Chung & O.T. Lewis
This dataset consists of moth and dung beetle recapture, movement, and trait data from a mark-release-recapture experiment conducted within riparian forest reserves, in an oil palm landscape in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo conducted as part of the SAFE project (Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems). This resource includes information regarding the recapture frequency and movement behaviour of both moths and dung beetles with respect to three habitat types: riparian forest reserve, continuous forest, and oil palm plantation....

Environmental conditions at saiga calving and die-off sites in Kazakhstan, 1979 to 2016

S. Robinson
This dataset describes environmental conditions at 135 Saiga antelope calving sites (from a total of 214) in Kazakhstan where the predictor variables required for the modelling were available at sufficient resolution. Data collected included climatic variables associated with haemorrhagic septicaemia in the literature, including humidity, temperature and precipitation. Indicators of vegetation biomass, phenology and length of the winter preceding calving were represented using the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), snow depth and snow presence data....

Avifauna occurrence data from a longitudinal experiment in human-modified Amazonian forests affected by the 2015-16 El Niño drought and associated fires

A. Lees, N. Moura, F.M. Franca, J.N. Ferreira, T. Gardner, E. Berenguer, L. Chesini, C. Andertti & J. Barlow
This data set includes longitudinal occurrence of bird species at 36 forest plots – half of which burned during the 2015-16 El Niño drought – distributed across a gradient of prior human disturbance in the Brazilian Amazon. Data was collected in 2010 and 2016 (around 6 years before, and one year after the 2015-16 El Niño, respectively) as part of the projects ‘Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems’ (AFIRE) and ‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem...

Microclimate proxy measurements from a logging gradient in Malaysian Borneo

B. Blonder, S. Both, D.A. Coomes, D.M.O. Elias, T. Jucker, J. Kvasnica, N. Majalap, Y.S. Malhi, T. Riutta & M. Svátek
Temperatures recorded 5cm above the forest floor in a gridded design (1 to 13m distance) within three, 1 hectare forest plots in Sabah, Borneo. The dataset also includes air temperature data from a nearby weather station at the same temporal resolution, and spatially-interpolated measurements of topography and canopy structure in each forest plot at a 1m resolution. iButton temperature measurement 5cm above the forest floor in gridded design (1-13m distance) within three 1-ha forest plots...

A time-series of strains in response to wind measured on 19 trees in Danum Valley, Malaysia

T. Jackson
Strain data measured on the trunks of 19 trees in the Danum Valley, Malaysia. It also contains wind speed data measured using anemometers attached to emergent trees nearby. This data can be used to extract the fundamental swaying frequencies of these trees, and to quantify the relationship between wind speed and bending strain and so estimate wind damage risk. This data would be useful for anyone studying the interaction between wind and trees. The tallest...

Strain measurements on 21 trees in Wytham Woods, UK

T. Jackson
This data contains the strain and wind data collected for 21 trees in Wytham Woods, a mature temperate woodland in southern England, from September 2015 to June 2016. This data was collected in order to (a) extract the resonant frequencies of trees, (b) to estimate the critical wind speeds at which the trees would break and (c) to test a finite element model of tree-wind dynamics. The strain data was collected at 4Hz using two...

Data from: Lepidosaurian diversity in the Mesozoic–Paleogene: the potential roles of sampling biases and environmental drivers

Terri J. Cleary, Roger B.J. Benson, Susan E. Evans, Paul M. Barrett & Roger B. J. Benson
Lepidosauria is a speciose clade with a long evolutionary history, but there have been few attempts to explore its taxon-richness through time. Here we estimate patterns of terrestrial lepidosaur genus diversity for the Triassic–Paleogene (252–23 Ma), and compare observed and sampling-corrected richness curves generated using Shareholder Quorum Subsampling and classical rarefaction. Generalized least-squares regression (GLS) is used to investigate the relationships between richness, sampling and environmental proxies. We found low levels of richness from the...

Data from: Positive effects of liana cutting on seedlings are reduced during El Niño-induced drought

Michael J. O'Brien, Christopher D. Philipson, Glen Reynolds, Dzaeman Dzulkifli, Jake L. Snaddon, Robert Ong & Andy Hector
1. Liana cutting is a management practice currently applied to encourage seedling regeneration and tree growth in some logged tropical forests. However, there is limited empirical evidence of its effects on forest demographic rates in Southeast Asia. 2. We used 22 four-hectare plots in the Sabah Biodiversity Experiment (a reduced impact logging site) enrichment line planted with 16 dipterocarp species to assess the effects of complete liana cutting on tree growth and survival. We compared...

Data from: Aeroecology of a solar eclipse

Cecilia Nilsson, Kyle G. Horton, Adriaan M. Dokter, Benjamin M. Van Doren & Andrew Farnsworth
Light cues elicit strong responses from nearly all forms of life, perhaps most notably as circadian rhythms entrained by periods of daylight and darkness. Atypical periods of darkness, like solar eclipses, provide rare opportunities to study biological responses to light cues. By using a continental scale radar network, we investigated responses of flying animals to the total solar eclipse of 21 August 2017. We quantified the number of biological targets in the atmosphere at 143...

Data from: Distinguishing the victim from the threat: SNP‐based methods reveal the extent of introgressive hybridization between wildcats and domestic cats in Scotland and inform future in situ and ex situ management options for species restoration

Helen V. Senn, Muhammad Ghazali, Jennifer Kaden, David Barcaly, Ben Harrower, Ruairidh D. Campbell, David W. MacDonald, Andrew C. Kitchener & David Barclay
The degree of introgressive hybridisation between the Scottish wildcat and domestic cat has long been suspected to be advanced. Here we use a 35-SNP-marker test, designed to assess hybridisation between wildcat and domestic cat populations in Scotland, to assess a database of 265 wild-living and captive cat samples, and test the assumptions of the test using 3097 SNP markers generated independently in a subset of the data using ddRAD. We discovered that despite increased genetic...

Data from: Strong responses from weakly interacting species

Sean Tuck, Janielle Porter, Mark Rees, Lindsay A. Turnbull & Sean L. Tuck
The impact of species loss from competitive communities partly depends on how populations of the surviving species respond. Predicting the response should be straightforward using models that describe population growth as a function of competitor densities; but these models require accurate estimates of interaction strengths. Here, we quantified how well we could predict responses to competitor removal in a community of annual plants, using a combination of observation and experiment. It was straightforward to fit...

Data from: Tropical dung beetle morphological traits predict functional traits and show intra-specific differences across land uses

Elizabeth H. Raine, Claudia L. Gray, Darren J. Mann & Eleanor M. Slade
1. Functional traits and functional diversity measures are increasingly being used to examine land use effects on biodiversity and community assembly rules. 2. Morphological traits are frequently derived from a mean value of many individuals, and used directly as functional traits. However, this approach overlooks the importance of intraspecific differences. 3. We collected morphometric data from over 1700 individuals of 12 species of dung beetle to establish whether morphological measurements can be used as predictors...

Data from: Unravelling the history of hepatitis B virus genotypes A and D infection using a full-genome phylogenetic and phylogeographic approach

Evangelia-Georgia Kostaki, Timokratis Karamitros, Garyfallia Stefanou, Ioannis Mamais, Konstantinos Angelis, Angelos Hatzakis, Anna Kramvis & Dimitrios Paraskevis
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection constitutes a global public health problem. In order to establish how HBV was disseminated across different geographic regions, we estimated the levels of regional clustering for genotypes D and A. We used 916 HBV-D and 493 HBV-A full-length sequences to reconstruct their global phylogeny. Phylogeographic analysis was conducted by reconstruction of ancestral states using the criterion of parsimony. The putative origin of genotype D was in North Africa/Middle East. HBV-D...

Data from: Dogs accompanied humans during the Neolithic expansion into Europe

Morgane Ollivier, Anne Tresset, Laurent A.F. Frantz, Stéphanie Brehard, Adrian Bălășescu, Marjan Mashkour, Adina Boroneant, Maud Pionnier-Capitan, Ophelie Lebrasseur, Rose-Marie Arbogast, László Bartosiewicz, Karyne Debue, Rivka Rabinovich, Mikhail V. Sablin, Greger Larson, Catherine Hänni, Christophe Hitte, Jean-Denis Vigne & Laurent A. F. Frantz
Near Eastern Neolithic farmers introduced several species of domestic plants and animals as they dispersed into Europe. Dogs were the only domestic species present in both Europe and the Near East prior to the Neolithic. Here, we assessed whether early Near Eastern dogs possessed a unique mitochondrial lineage that differentiated them from Mesolithic European populations. We then analysed mitochondrial DNA sequences from 99 ancient European and Near-Eastern dogs spanning the Upper Palaeolithic to the Bronze...

Data from: A new actinopterygian from the Late Devonian Gogo Formation, Western Australia

Brian Choo, Jing Lu, Sam Giles, Kate Trinajstic & John A. Long
The study of early actinopterygians (ray-finned fishes) from the Devonian has been hampered by imperfect preservation in the majority of taxa. The Late Devonian (early Frasnian) Gogo Formation of north-western Western Australia is notable in producing complete fossil actinopterygians with exceptional three-dimensional preservation of both the dermal and endoskeletal anatomy. Four taxa have been described and have proved invaluable in understanding the anatomy of early representatives of this clade. Here, we present a fifth Gogo...

Data from: Estimating environmental suitability

John M. Drake & Robert L. Richards
Methods for modeling species’ distributions in nature are typically evaluated empirically with respect to data from observations of species occurrence and, occasionally, absence at surveyed locations. Such models are relatively “theory‐free.” In contrast, theories for explaining species’ distributions draw on concepts like fitness, niche, and environmental suitability. This paper proposes that environmental suitability be defined as the conditional probability of occurrence of a species given the state of the environment at a location. Any quantity...

Data from: Ecological correlates of the spatial co-occurrence of sympatric mammalian carnivores worldwide

Courtney L. Davis, Lindsey N. Rich, Zach J. Farris, Marcella J. Kelly, Mario S. Di Bitetti, Yamil Di Blanco, Sebastian Albanesi, Mohammad S. Farhadinia, Navid Gholikhani, Sandra Hamel, Bart J. Harmsen, Claudia Wultsch, Mamadou D. Kane, Quinton Martins, Asia J. Murphy, Robin Steenweg, S. Sunarto, Atieh Taktehrani, Kanchan Thapa, Jody M. Tucker, Jesse Whittington, Febri A. Widodo, Nigel G. Yoccoz, David A.W. Miller & Yamil Di Blanco
The composition of local mammalian carnivore communities has far-reaching effects on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. To better understand how carnivore communities are structured, we analyzed camera trap data for 108,087 trap days across 12 countries spanning 5 continents. We estimate local probabilities of co-occurrence among 768 species pairs from the order Carnivora and evaluate how shared ecological traits correlated with probabilities of co-occurrence. Within individual study areas, species pairs co-occurred more frequently than expected at random....

Data from: A redescription of Orovenator mayorum (Sauropsida, Diapsida) using high-resolution μCT and the consequences for early amniote phylogeny

David P. Ford, Roger B.J. Benson & Roger B. J. Benson
The earliest known neodiapsid Orovenator mayorum from the early Permian of Oklahoma is redescribed using high-resolution μCT, revealing remarkable details of the skull anatomy. Our findings are relevant to both palaeoecology (suggesting burrowing and nocturnality) and phylogeny. Orovenator and other sauropsids share at least 16 character states with varanopids, many of which were not recognised by previous studies. These include a rounded subnarial shelf of the premaxilla, a posterodorsal extension of the external naris, the...

Data from: Living on the edge: multiscale habitat selection by cheetahs in a human-wildlife landscape

Britt Klaassen & Femke Broekhuis
Animals select habitats that will ultimately optimise their fitness through access to favourable resources, such as food, mates, and breeding sites. However, access to these resources may be limited by bottom-up effects, such as availability, and top-down effects such as risk avoidance and competition, including that with humans. Competition between wildlife and people over resources, specifically over space, has played a significant role in the worldwide decrease of large carnivores. The goal of this study...

Data from: The influence of evaluative right/wrong feedback on phonological and semantic processes in word learning

Saloni Krishnan, Elise Sellars, Helena Wood, Dorothy V.M. Bishop, Kate E. Watkins & Dorothy V. M. Bishop
Feedback is typically incorporated in word learning paradigms, in both research studies and commercial language learning apps. While the common-sense view is that feedback is helpful during learning, relatively little empirical evidence about the role of feedback in spoken vocabulary learning exists. Some work has suggested that long-term word learning is not enhanced by the presence of feedback, and that words are best learned implicitly. It is also plausible that feedback might have differential effects...

Data from: Heritable spouse effects increase evolutionary potential of human reproductive timing

Simon R. Evans, Dominique Waldvogel, Nina Vasiljevic & Erik Postma
Sexual reproduction is inherently interactive, especially in animal species such as humans that exhibit extended pair bonding. Yet we have little knowledge of the role of male characteristics and their evolutionary impact on reproductive behavioural phenotypes, to the extent that biologists typically consider component traits (e.g., reproductive timing) as female-specific. Based on extensive genealogical data detailing the life-histories of 6,435 human mothers born across four centuries of modern history, we use an animal modelling approach...

Data from: Microenvironment and functional-trait context dependence predict alpine plant community dynamics

Benjamin Blonder, Rozalia E. Kapas, Rebecca M. Dalton, Bente J. Graae, Jacob M. Heiling & Øystein H. Opedal
Predicting the structure and dynamics of communities is difficult. Approaches linking functional traits to niche boundaries, species co‐occurrence and demography are promising, but have so far had limited success. We hypothesized that predictability in community ecology could be improved by incorporating more accurate measures of fine‐scale environmental heterogeneity and the context‐dependent function of traits. We tested these hypotheses using long term whole‐community demography data from an alpine plant community in Colorado. Species distributions along microenvironmental...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A.F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Laurent A. F. Frantz
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: Rewilding in the English Uplands: policy and practice

Christopher J. Sandom, Benedict Dempsey, David Bullock, Adrian Ely, Paul Jepson, Stefan Jimenez-Wisler, Adrian Newton, Nathalie Pettorelli & Rebecca A. Senior
Rewilding is gaining momentum as a new approach to restore and conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services, despite being imprecisely defined, controversial, and with limited explicit empirical supporting evidence (Lorimer et al., 2015; Pettorelli et al., 2018; Svenning et al., 2016). In a case study region (the English uplands), we discuss what rewilding means to practitioners and policy makers; the risks, opportunities, and barriers to implementation, and potential paths for policy and practice.

Registration Year

  • 2018
    76

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    76

Affiliations

  • University of Oxford
    76
  • University of Zurich
    5
  • Australian National University
    4
  • University of Edinburgh
    4
  • University of Sheffield
    4
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • Queen Mary University of London
    3
  • National Museum
    2
  • University of Sussex
    2
  • University of Pennsylvania
    2
  • Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp
    2
  • Queen's University Belfast
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    2
  • Lund University
    2