55 Works

Data from: Examining the occupancy-density relationship for a low-density carnivore

Daniel W. Linden, Angela K. Fuller, J. Andrew Royle & Matthew P. Hare
1. The challenges associated with monitoring low-density carnivores across large landscapes have limited the ability to implement and evaluate conservation and management strategies for such species. Non-invasive sampling techniques and advanced statistical approaches have alleviated some of these challenges and can even allow for spatially explicit estimates of density, one of the most valuable wildlife monitoring tools. 2. For some species, individual identification comes at no cost when unique attributes (e.g. pelage patterns) can be...

Data from: A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny

(LPWG), Legume Phylogeny Working Group, Anne Bruneau, Nasim Azani, Marielle Babineau, Edeline Gagnon, Carole Sinou, Royce Steeves, Erin Zimmerman, C. Donovan Bailey, Lynsey Kovar, Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao, Hannah Banks, RuthP. Clark, Manuel De La Estrella, Peter Gasson, GeoffreyC. Kite, BenteB. Klitgaard, GwilymP. Lewis, Danilo Neves, Gerhard Prenner, María De Lourdes Rico-Arce, ArianeR. Barbosa, Maria Cristina López-Roberts, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, PétalaG. Ribeiro … & Tingshuang Yi
The classification of the legume family proposed here addresses the long-known non-monophyly of the traditionally recognised subfamily Caesalpinioideae, by recognising six robustly supported monophyletic subfamilies. This new classification uses as its framework the most comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of legumes to date, based on plastid matK gene sequences, and including near-complete sampling of genera (698 of the currently recognised 765 genera) and ca. 20% (3696) of known species. The matK gene region has been the most...

Data from: Behavioral tactic predicts preoptic-hypothalamic gene expression more strongly than developmental morph in fish with alternative reproductive tactics

Joel A. Tripp, Ni Y. Feng & Andrew H. Bass
Reproductive success relies on the coordination of social behaviors, such as territory defense, courtship, and mating. Species with extreme variation in reproductive tactics are useful models for identifying the neural mechanisms underlying social behavior plasticity. The plainfin midshipman (Porichthys notatus) is a teleost fish with two male reproductive morphs that follow widely divergent developmental trajectories and display alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs). Type I males defend territories, court females, and provide paternal care, but will resort...

Data from: Rapid phenotypic change in a native bird population following conversion of the Colorado Desert to agriculture

Nicholas A. Mason & Philip Unitt
Humans are modifying our planet’s ecosystems with increasing frequency and intensity. Exploring population responses to anthropogenic modifications of natural habitat provides insights into how species persist in the Anthropocene. Here, we leverage natural history collections to document rapid phenotypic change within a native bird population following 80 years of agriculture in the Colorado Desert of southeastern California. By comparing spectrophotometric measurements of Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) specimens collected in the Imperial Valley from 1918 to...

Data from: Dispersing hydrophobic natural colorant β-carotene in shellac particles for enhanced stability and tunable color

Dong Chen, Chun-Xia Zhao, Camille Lagoin, Mingtan Hai, Laura R. Arriaga, Stephan Koehler, Alireza Abbaspourrad & David A. Weitz
Color is one of the most important visual attributes of food and is directly related to the perception of food quality. The interest in natural colorants, especially β-carotene that not only imparts color but also has well-documented health benefits, has triggered the research and development of different protocols designed to entrap these hydrophobic natural molecules to improve their stability against oxidation. Here, we report a versatile microfluidic approach that utilizes single emulsion droplets as templates...

Data from: Phylogenetic relationships, breeding implications, and cultivation history of Hawaiian taro (Colocasia esculenta) through genome-wide SNP genotyping

Martin Helmkampf, Thomas K. Wolfgruber, M. Renee Bellinger, Roshan Paudel, Michael B. Kantar, Susan C. Miyasaka, Heather Kimball, Ashley Brown, Anne Veillet, Andrew Read & Michael Shintaku
Taro, Colocasia esculenta, is one of the world’s oldest root crops and of particular economic and cultural significance in Hawai‘i, where historically more than 150 different landraces were grown. We developed a genome-wide set of more than 2400 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from 70 taro accessions of Hawaiian, South Pacific, Palauan, and mainland Asian origins, with several objectives: (a) uncover the phylogenetic relationships between Hawaiian and other Pacific landraces, (b) shed light on...

Data from: Idiosyncratic responses to climate-driven forest fragmentation and marine incursions in reed frogs from Central Africa and the Gulf of Guinea Islands

Rayna C. Bell, Juan L. Parra, Gabriel Badjedjea, Michael F. Barej, David C. Blackburn, Marius Burger, Alan Channing, J. Maximilian Dehling, Eli Greenbaum, Václav Gvoždík, Jos Kielgast, Chifundera Kusamba, Stefan Lötters, Patrick J. McLaughlin, Zoltán T. Nagy, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Daniel M. Portik, Bryan L. Stuart, Jeremy VanDerWal, Ange-Ghislain Zassi Boulou & Kelly R. Zamudio
Organismal traits interact with environmental variation to mediate how species respond to shared landscapes. Thus, differences in traits related to dispersal ability or physiological tolerance may result in phylogeographic discordance among co-distributed taxa, even when they are responding to common barriers. We quantified climatic suitability and stability, and phylogeographic divergence within three reed frog species complexes across the Guineo-Congolian forests and Gulf of Guinea archipelago of Central Africa to investigate how they responded to a...

Data from: Linking the wintering and breeding grounds of warblers along the Pacific Flyway

David P. L. Toews, Julian Heavyside & Darren E. Irwin
Long-distance migration is a behavior that is exhibited by many animal groups. The evolution of novel migration routes can play an important role in range expansions, ecological interactions, and speciation. New migration routes may evolve in response to selection in favor of reducing distance between breeding and wintering areas, or avoiding navigational barriers. Many migratory changes are likely to evolve gradually and are therefore difficult to study. Here, we attempt to connect breeding and wintering...

Data from: Temperature variation, bacterial diversity, and fungal infection dynamics in the amphibian skin

Ana V. Longo & Kelly R. Zamudio
Host-associated bacterial communities on the skin act as the first line of defence against invading pathogens. Yet, for most natural systems, we lack a clear understanding of how temperature variability affects structure and composition of skin bacterial communities and, in turn, promotes or limits the colonization of opportunistic pathogens. Here, we examine how natural temperature fluctuations might be related to changes in skin bacterial diversity over time in three amphibian populations infected by the pathogenic...

Data from: Relaxation of herbivore-mediated selection drives the evolution of genetic covariances between plant competitive and defense traits

Akane Uesugi, Tim Connallon, Andre Kessler & Keyne Monro
Insect herbivores are important mediators of selection on traits that impact plant defense against herbivory and competitive ability. Although recent experiments demonstrate a central role for herbivory in driving rapid evolution of defense and competition-mediating traits, whether and how herbivory shapes heritable variation in these traits remains poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the structure and evolutionary stability of the G matrix for plant metabolites that are involved in defense and allelopathy in the tall goldenrod,...

Data from: Absence of population structure across elevational gradients despite large phenotypic variation in mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)

Carrie L. Branch, Joshua P. Jahner, Dovid Y. Kozlovsky, Thomas L. Parchman & Vladimir V. Pravosudov
Montane habitats are characterized by predictably rapid heterogeneity along elevational gradients and are useful for investigating the consequences of environmental heterogeneity for local adaptation and population genetic structure. Food-caching mountain chickadees inhabit a continuous elevation gradient in the Sierra Nevada, and birds living at harsher, high elevations have better spatial memory ability and exhibit differences in male song structure and female mate preference compared to birds inhabiting milder, low elevations. While high elevation birds breed,...

Data from: Mlh3 mutations in baker's yeast alter meiotic recombination outcomes by increasing noncrossover events genome-wide

Najla Al-Sweel, Vandana Raghavan, Abhishek Dutta, V. P. Ajith, Luigi Di Vietro, Nabila Khondakar, Carol Manhart, Jennifer Surtees, K. T. Nishant, Eric Alani, Carol M. Manhart & Jennifer A. Surtees
Mlh1-Mlh3 is an endonuclease hypothesized to act in meiosis to resolve double Holliday junctions into crossovers. It also plays a minor role in eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR). To understand how Mlh1-Mlh3 functions in both meiosis and MMR, we analyzed in baker's yeast 60 new mlh3 alleles. Five alleles specifically disrupted MMR, whereas one (mlh3-32) specifically disrupted meiotic crossing over. Mlh1-mlh3 representatives for each class were purified and characterized. Both Mlh1-mlh3-32 (MMR+, crossover-) and Mlh1-mlh3-45...

Data from: Year-round spatiotemporal distribution of harbour porpoises within and around the Maryland wind energy area

Jessica E. Wingfield, Michael O'Brien, Vyacheslav Lyubchich, Jason J. Roberts, Patrick N. Halpin, Aaron N. Rice, Helen Bailey & Michael O’Brien
Offshore windfarms provide renewable energy, but activities during the construction phase can affect marine mammals. To understand how the construction of an offshore windfarm in the Maryland Wind Energy Area (WEA) off Maryland, USA, might impact harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), it is essential to determine their poorly understood year-round distribution. Although habitat-based models can help predict the occurrence of species in areas with limited or no sampling, they require validation to determine the accuracy of...

Data from: Programmed and flexible: long-term Zugunruhe data highlight the many axes of variation in avian migratory behaviour

Benjamin M. Van Doren, Miriam Liedvogel & Barbara Helm
Studies of Zugunruhe – the ‘migratory restlessness’ behaviour of captive birds – have been integral to our understanding of animal migration, revealing an inherited propensity to migrate and an endogenous timing and navigation system. However, differences between Zugunruhe in captivity and migration in the wild call for more data, in particular on variation within and among taxa with diverse migration strategies. Here, we characterise Zugunruhe in a long-term dataset of activity profiles from stonechats (genus...

Data from: Subspecies delineation amid phenotypic, geographic, and genetic discordance in a songbird

Jennifer Walsh, Irby J. Lovette, Virginia Winder, Chris S. Elphick, Brian J. Olsen, W. Gregory Shriver, Adrienne I. Kovach & Gregory Shriver
Understanding the processes that drive divergence within and among species is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology. Traditional approaches to assessing differentiation rely on phenotypes to identify intra- and interspecific variation, but many species express subtle morphological gradients in which boundaries among forms are unclear. This intraspecific variation may be driven by differential adaptation to local conditions and may thereby reflect the evolutionary potential within a species. Here, we combine genetic and morphological data to...

Data from: Digest: trait variation in Mimulus provides new evidence for the joint action of ecological sorting and character displacement

Katherine Elizabeth Eisen & Katherine E. Eisen
Understanding how closely related species coexist in communities is one of the oldest goals of ecology and evolutionary biology. One long-standing hypothesis is that the evolution of key differences in species’ niches or ecological requirements (a process known as niche differentiation) can minimize competition and promote coexistence.

Data from: Predicting peatland carbon fluxes from non-destructive plant traits

Ellie M. Goud, Tim R. Moore & Nigel T. Roulet
1. Determining the plant traits that best predict carbon (C) storage is increasingly important as global change drivers will affect plant species composition and ecosystem C cycling. Despite the critical role of peatlands in the global C cycle, trait-flux relationships in peatlands are relatively unknown. 2. We assessed the ability of four non-destructive plant traits to predict carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes over two growing seasons in a temperate peatland in Ontario, Canada....

Data from: Climate variability predicts thermal limits of aquatic insects across elevation and latitude

Alisha A. Shah, Brian A. Gill, Andrea C. Encalada, Alexander S. Flecker, W. Chris Funk, Juan M. Guayasamin, Boris C. Kondratieff, N. LeRoy Poff, Steven A. Thomas, Kelly R. Zamudio & Cameron K. Ghalambor
Janzen's extension of the climate variability hypothesis posits that increased seasonal variation at high latitudes should result in greater temperature overlap across elevations, and favor wider thermal breadths in temperate organisms compared to their tropical counterparts. We tested these predictions by measuring stream temperatures and thermal breadths (i.e. the difference between the critical thermal maximum and minimum) of 62 aquatic insect species from temperate (Colorado, USA) and tropical (Papallacta, Ecuador) streams spanning an elevation gradient...

Data from: Leaf herbivory imposes fitness costs mediated by hummingbird and insect pollinators

Alexander Chautá, Susan Whithehead, Marisol Amaya-Márquez, Katja Poveda & Susan Whitehead
Plant responses induced by herbivore damage can provide fitness benefits, but can also have important costs due to altered interactions with mutualist pollinators. We examined the effects of plant responses to herbivory in a hummingbird-pollinated distylous shrub, Palicourea angustifolia. Through a series of field experiments we investigated whether damage from foliar herbivores leads to a reduction in fruit set, influences floral visitation, or alters floral traits that may influence pollinator preference or pollinator efficiency. Foliar...

Data from: Campylobacter jejuni infection associated with relatively poor condition and low survival in a wild bird

Conor C. Taff & Andrea K. Townsend
Campylobacter jejuni is the most common foodborne pathogen in industrialized countries. Most human infections come from contaminated poultry, but wild birds are also known to harbor C. jejuni. Wild birds are often described as asymptomatic carriers, but this assumption is based on domestic poultry research. We studied the effects of C. jejuni infection on body condition and survival of adult and nestling American crows Corvus brachyrhynchos in Davis, California. Previous work demonstrated that more than...

Data from: Landscape simplification reduces classical biological control and crop yield

Heather Grab, Bryan Danforth, Katja Poveda, Gregory Loeb & Greg Loeb
Agricultural intensification resulting in the simplification of agricultural landscapes is known to negatively impact the delivery of key ecosystem services such as the biological control of crop pests. Both conservation and classical biological control may be influenced by the landscape context in which they are deployed; yet studies examining the role of landscape structure in the establishment and success of introduced natural enemies and their interactions with native communities are lacking. In this study, we...

Data from: Day/night upper thermal limits differ within Ectatomma ruidum ant colonies

Annika S. Nelson, Trey Scott, Maciej Barczyk, Terrence P. McGlynn, Arian Avalos, Elizabeth Clifton, Amlan Das, Andreia Figueiredo, Laura L. Figueroa, Mark Janowiecki, Sarah Pahlke, Jignasha D. Rana & Sean O'Donnell
In the tropics, daily temperature fluctuations can pose physiological challenges for ectothermic organisms, and upper thermal limits may affect foraging activity over the course of the day. Variation in upper thermal limits can occur among and within species, and for social insects such as ants, within colonies. Within colonies, upper thermal limits may differ among individuals or change for an individual throughout the day. Daytime foragers of the Neotropical ant Ectatomma ruidum have higher critical...

Data from: A point mutation in a herpesvirus co-determines neuropathogenicity and viral shedding

Mathias Franz, Laura B. Goodman, Gerlinde R. Van De Walle, Nikolaus Osterrieder, Alex D. Greenwood, Laura Goodman, Gerlinde Van De Walle & Alex Greenwood
A point mutation in the DNA polymerase gene in equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is one determinant for the development of neurological disease in horses. Three recently conducted infection experiments using domestic horses and ponies failed to detect statistically significant differences in viral shedding between the neuropathogenic and non-neuropathogenic variants. These results were interpreted as suggesting the absence of a consistent selective advantage of the neuropathogenic variant and therefore appeared to be inconsistent with a...

Data from: Elevational replacement of two Himalayan titmice: interspecific competition or habitat preference?

Sahas Barve & André A. Dhondt
Elevational species replacement is a widely documented pattern in montane species. Although interspecific competition has been shown to be important in setting species elevational limits in tropical habitats, its effect in species of temperate regions is poorly studied. We tested the role of interspecific competition for space in the breeding season and for food in the non-breeding season in mediating the distribution of two resident titmice species in the Himalayas. We show that high elevation...

Data from: Balancing selection for aflatoxin in Aspergillus flavus is maintained through interference competition with, and fungivory by insects

Milton T. Drott, Brian P. Lazzaro, Dan L. Brown, Ignazio Carbone & Michael G. Milgroom
The role of microbial secondary metabolites in the ecology of the organisms that produce them remains poorly understood. Variation in aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus is maintained by balancing selection, but the ecological function and impact on fungal fitness of this compound are unknown. We hypothesize that balancing selection for aflatoxin production in A. flavus is driven by interaction with insects. To test this, we competed naturally occurring aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic fungal isolates against Drosophila...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    55

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    55

Affiliations

  • Cornell University
    55
  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    4
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of New Hampshire
    3
  • University of Cape Town
    3
  • Sao Paulo State University
    2
  • University of the Western Cape
    2
  • Panthera Corporation
    2
  • Smithsonian Institution
    2
  • University of Connecticut
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • Harvard University
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • Drexel University
    2
  • Iowa State University
    2