4 Works

Support for the habitat amount hypothesis from a global synthesis of species density studies

James Watling, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Marion Pfeifer, Lander Baeten, Cristina Banks-Leite, Laura Cisneros, Rebecca Fang, Caroli Hamel-Leigue, Thibault Lachat, Inara Leal, Luc Lens, Hugh Possingham, Dinarzarde Raheem, Danilo Ribeiro, Eleanor Slade, Nicolas Urbina-Cardona, Eric Wood & Lenore Fahrig
Decades of research suggest that species richness depends on spatial characteristics of habitat patches, especially their size and isolation. In contrast, the habitat amount hypothesis predicts that: 1) species richness in plots of fixed size (species density) is more strongly and positively related to the amount of habitat around the plot than to patch size or isolation; 2) habitat amount better predicts species density than patch size and isolation combined, 3) there is no effect...

Least-cost habitat linkages for American black bear, Rafinesque's big-eared bat, and timber rattlesnake.

Jennifer Costanza, James Watling, Ron Sutherland, Curtis Belyea, Bistra Dilkina, Heather Cayton, David Bucklin, Stephanie Romañach & Nicholas Haddad
This data set contains 3 shapefiles and associated files that map linkages, which are least-cost paths between adjacent habitat cores for three wildlife species in the Southeastern U.S. The species are: the American black bear (Ursus americanus), Rafinesque's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii), and Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus). We mapped habitat cores based on c. 2006 land cover, then used LinkageMapper software to identify least-cost paths between them, and buffered the least-cost paths by 2.5 km...

Data from: Chemical defenses shift with the seasonal vertical migration of a Panamanian poison frog

Edmund W Basham, Ralph A Saporito, Macario González-Pinzón, Angel Romero-Marcucci & Brett R Scheffers
Dendrobatid poison frogs sequester lipophilic alkaloids from their arthropod prey to use as a form of chemical defense. Some dendrobatid frogs seasonally migrate between the leaf litter of the forest floor in the dry season to the canopy in the wet season, which may yield differences in prey (arthropods) and therefore alkaloid availability over space and time. Here, we document a seasonal vertical migration of Andinobates fulguritus (the yellow-bellied poison frog) from ground to canopy...

Ecological niche models for American black bear, Rafinesque's big-eared bat, and timber rattlesnake

James Watling, Jennifer Costanza, Ron Sutherland, Curtis Belyea, Bistra Dilkina, Heather Cayton, David Bucklin, Stephanie Romañach & Nick Haddad
This data set contains rasters that are predictive environmental suitability maps for three wildlife species: the American black bear (Ursus americanus), Rafinesque's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii), and Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus). Rasters for each species include: individual prediction maps for each of 5 ENMs (GBM: generalized boosting model, GLM: generalized linear model, MARS: multivariate adaptive regression spline, MX: maximum entropy, and RF: random forest), as well as the ensemble prediction map from all five ecological...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • John Carroll University
    4
  • University of Florida
    3
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • University of Southern California
    2
  • North Carolina State University
    2
  • Michigan State University
    2
  • Ghent University
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Natural History Museum
    1
  • Newcastle University
    1