30 Works

Sex and age differences in tree cavity dependence in a small arboreal marsupial

Ross Goldingay
Many mammal species depend on tree cavities for shelter and for breeding. Some species may use tree cavities as well as other varied shelters but the extent of their dependence on tree cavities is unknown. One such species is the eastern pygmy-possum (Cercartetus nanus) from eastern Australia which typically shelters alone. I addressed four key questions: i) do different age and sex classes differ in their preferences for small (4 cm diameter) and large (10...

The hidden army: coralivorous Crown of Thorns seastars can spend years as herbivorous juveniles

Dione Deaker, Antonio Agüera, Huang-An Lin, Corinne Lawson, Claire Budden, Symon Dworjanyn, Benjamin Moss & Maria Byrne
Crown of Thorns seastar (COTS) outbreaks are a major threat to coral reefs. Although the herbivorous juveniles and their switch to corallivory are key to seeding outbreaks, they remain a black box in our understanding of COTS. We investigated the impact of a delay in diet transition due to coral scarcity in cohorts reared on coralline algae for 10 months and 6.5 yrs before being offered coral. Both cohorts achieved an asymptotic size (16–18 mm...

Data from: Assessing the trophic ecology of top predators across a recolonisation frontier using DNA metabarcoding of diets

Natasha Hardy, Tina Berry, Brendan P. Kelaher, Simon D. Goldsworthy, Michael Bunce, Melinda A. Coleman, Bronwyn M. Gillanders, Sean D. Connell, Michelle Blewitt, Will Figueira, BM Gillanders, SD Connell, BP Kelaher & SD Goldsworthy
Top predator populations, once intensively hunted, are rebounding in size and geographic distribution. The cessation of sealing along coastal Australia and subsequent recovery of Australian Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus and long-nosed A. forsteri fur seals represents a unique opportunity to investigate trophic linkages at a frontier of predator recolonisation. We characterised the diets of both species across 2 locations of recolonisation, one site an established breeding colony, and the other, a new but permanent haul-out site....

Data from: Invasion-mediated effects on marine trophic interactions in a changing climate: positive feedbacks favour kelp persistence

Ricardo Miranda, Melinda Coleman, Alejandro Tagliafico, Maria Rangel, Lea Mamo, Francisco Barros & Brendan Kelaher
The interactive effects of ocean warming and invasive species are complex and remain a source of uncertainty for projecting future ecological change. Climate-mediated change to trophic interactions can have pervasive ecological consequences, but the role of invasion in mediating trophic effects is largely unstudied. Using manipulative experiments in replicated outdoor mesocosms, we reveal how near-future ocean warming and macrophyte invasion scenarios interactively impact gastropod grazing intensity and preference for consumption of foundation macroalgae (Ecklonia radiata...

Rates of ascidian mediated nitrogen cycling

Dirk Erler & Katie Kelly
Large solitary ascidians, like Herdmania grandis (Heller), can dominate the benthic substrates of subtropical and temperate reefs, however their influence on nitrogen cycling, particularly nitrous oxide (N2O) production, is unknown. Here we incubated individual H. grandis and compared fluxes of dissolved inorganic and gaseous nitrogen species to fluxes from reef sediments. Nitrous oxide production rates per individual ascidian (21 ± 8 nmol ind h-1) are the highest reported for any marine invertebrate. An individual ascidian...

Data from: A review of protocols for the experimental release of kelp (Laminariales) zoospores

Nahlah Alsuwayian, Margaret Mohring, Marion Cambridge, Melinda Coleman, Gary Kendrick & Thomas Wernberg
Kelps (order Laminariales) are foundation species in temperate and arctic seas globally, but they are in decline in many places. Laminarian kelp have an alternation of generations and this poses challenges for experimental studies due to the difficulties in achieving zoospore release and gametophyte growth. Here we review and synthesize the protocols that have been used to induce zoospore release in kelps to identify commonalities and provide guidance on best practices. We found 171 papers,...

Data from: Comparative phylogeography of three host sea anemones in the Indo-Pacific

Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Madeleine Emms, Emily Giles, Remy Gatins, Gerrit Nanninga, Anna Scott, Jean Paul Hobbs, Ashley Frisch, Suzanne Mills, Ricardo Beldade & Michael Berumen
Aim The mutualistic relationship between anemones and anemonefishes is one of the most iconic examples of symbiosis. However, while anemonefishes have been extensively studied in terms of genetic connectivity, such information is lacking entirely for host sea anemones. Here, we provide the first information on the broad-scale population structure and phylogeographic patterns of three species of host sea anemone, Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla mertensii, and Entacmaea quadricolor. We evaluate if there is concordance in genetic structure...

Data from: First circumglobal assessment of Southern Hemisphere humpback whale mitochondrial genetic variation and implications for management

Howard C. Rosenbaum, Francine Kershaw, Martin Mendez, Cristina Pomilla, Matthew S. Leslie, Ken P. Findlay, Peter B. Best, Timothy Collins, Michel Vely, Marcia H. Engel, Robert Baldwin, Gianna Minton, Michael Meyer, Lillian Florez-Gonzalez, M. Michael Poole, Nan Hauser, Claire Garrigue, Muriel Brasseur, John Bannister, Megan Anderson, Carlos Olavarria & C. Scott Baker
The description of genetic population structure over a species’ geographic range can provide insights into its evolutionary history and also support effective management efforts. Assessments for globally distributed species are rare, however, requiring significant international coordination and collaboration. The global distribution of demographically discrete populations for the humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae is not fully known, hampering the definition of appropriate management units. Here, we present the first circumglobal assessment of mitochondrial genetic population structure across...

Data from: Seascape habitat patchiness and hydrodynamics explain genetic structuring of kelp populations

Christopher Burridge, Melinda A Coleman, Graham Edgar, Neville S Barrett, Halley M S Durrant, HMS Durrant, NS Barrett, GJ Edgar, CP Burridge & MA Coleman
Macroalgae underpin most temperate inshore ecosystems, but increasing macroalgal loss, fragmentation and range contractions are eroding connectivity among populations. Understanding loss, and predicting the likelihood of recovery, is dependent on knowledge of population connectivity and how it is mediated by variability in local seascapes. Although many studies of marine connectivity have focussed on influences of geographic distance on genetic structure, the contribution of intervening habitat is rarely considered. We tested the extent to which geographic...

Data from: Increased temperature, but not acidification, enhances fertilization and development in a tropical urchin: potential for adaptation to a tropicalized eastern Australia

Shawna A. Foo, Symon A. Dworjanyn, Mehar S. Khatkar, Alistair G. B. Poore & Maria Byrne
To predict effects of global change on marine populations, it is important to measure the effects of climate stressors on performance and potential for adaptation. Adaptation depends on heritable genetic variance for stress tolerance being present in populations. We determined effects of near-future ocean conditions on fertilisation success of the sea urchin Pseudoboletia indiana. In 16 multiple dam-sire crosses, we quantified genetic variation in tolerance of warming (+3°C) and acidification (-0.3-0.5 pH units) at the...

Online learning in a time of COVID disruption? The experiences of principals from New South Wales rural and disadvantaged primary schools

Julie-Ann Paredes, Marilyn Chaseling & William E. Boyd

Data from: Mangrove outwelling is a significant source of oceanic exchangeable organic carbon

James Z. Sippo, Damien T. Maher, Douglas R. Tait, Sergio Ruiz-Halpern, Christian J. Sanders & Isaac R. Santos
Exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC) makes up a significant proportion of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool, yet EDOC sources to the coastal ocean are poorly constrained. We measured the exchange of EDOC and concentrations of EDOC and DOC in mangrove waters over a 26° latitudinal gradient. A clear latitudinal trend was observed, with the highest EDOC concentrations in the tropics. EDOC exports to the coastal ocean were 4.7 ± 1.9 mmol m−2 d−1,...

Data from: Environmental determinism, and not interspecific competition, drive morphological variability in Australasian warblers (Acanthizidae)

Vicente García-Navas, Marta Rodriguez-Rey, Petter Z. Marki & Les Christidis
Interspecific competition is thought to play a key role in determining the coexistence of closely related species within adaptive radiations. Competition for ecological resources can lead to different outcomes from character displacement to, ultimately, competitive exclusion. Accordingly, divergent natural selection should disfavor those species that are the most similar to their competitor in resource use, thereby increasing morphological disparity. Here we examined ecomorphological variability within an Australo-Papuan bird radiation, the Acanthizidae, which include both allopatric...

Data from: Upgrades of coastal protection infrastructure affect benthic communities

Lea Mamo, Augustine Porter, Alejandro Tagliafico, Melinda Coleman, Stephen Smith, Will Figueira & Brendan Kelaher
Sea level rise, storm surges, aging and wear are forcing upgrades to breakwaters and seawalls to protect coastal areas from erosion and inundation. Such upgrades involve the introduction of new material which may consequently act as an ecological disturbance that can alter established marine communities and ecosystem function. Mitigating ecological impacts requires an understanding of how species assemblages are affected by such works. Here, we use the major upgrade of a regularly wave-overtopped breakwater as...

Diel temperature and pH variability scale with depth across diverse coral reef habitats

Tyler Cyronak, Yui Takeshita, Travis A. Courtney, Eric H. DeCarlo, Bradley D. Eyre, David I. Kline, Todd Martz, Heather Page, Nichole N. Price, Jennifer Smith, Laura Stoltenberg, Martin Tresguerres & Andreas J. Andersson
Coral reefs are facing intensifying stressors, largely due to global increases in seawater temperature and decreases in pH. However, there is extensive environmental variability within coral reef ecosystems which can impact how organisms respond to global trends. We deployed spatial arrays of autonomous sensors across distinct shallow coral reef habitats to determine patterns of spatiotemporal variability in seawater physicochemical parameters. Temperature and pH were positively correlated over the course of a day due to solar...

Data from: Ecological opportunity and ecomorphological convergence in Australasian robins (Petroicidae)

Vicente García-Navas, Marta Rodriguez-Rey & Les Christidis
Ecological theories of adaptive radiation predict that ecological opportunity (EO) stimulates cladogenesis through entry into a novel environment and/or release of competition pressures. Due to its dynamic paleoclimatic and geological history, the Australo-Papuan region constitutes an opportune scenario to study patterns of diversification in relation to the colonization of new ecological niches. Here, we employ a comparative framework using the Australasian robins (Petroicidae) as a model system to test whether the diversification of this bird...

Data from: DNA barcoding reveals the coral “laboratory-rat”, Stylophora pistillata encompasses multiple identities

Shashank Keshavmurthy, Sung-Yin Yang, Ada Alamaru, Yao-Yang Chuang, Michel Pichon, David Obura, Silvia Fontana, Stephane De Palmas, Fabrizio Stefani, Francesca Benzoni, Angus MacDonald, Annika M. E. Noreen, Chienshun Chen, Carden C. Wallace, Ruby M. Pillay, Vianney Denis, Affendi Yang Amri, James D. Reimer, Takuma Mezaki, Charles Sheppard, Yossi Loya, Avidor Abelson, Mohammed S. Mohammed, Andrew C. Baker, Pargol G. Mostafavi … & Chaolun A. Chen
Stylophora pistillata is a widely used coral “lab-rat” species with highly variable morphology and a broad biogeographic range (Red Sea to western central Pacific). Here we show, by analysing Cytochorme Oxidase I sequences, from 241 samples across this range, that this taxon in fact comprises four deeply divergent clades corresponding to the Pacific-Western Australia, Chagos-Madagascar-South Africa, Gulf of Aden-Zanzibar- Madagascar, and Red Sea-Persian/Arabian Gulf-Kenya. On the basis of the fossil record of Stylophora, these four...

Schooling in a time of disruption: the impact of COVID-19 from the perspective of five New South Wales (Australia) secondary principals

Marilyn Chaseling, Julie-Ann Paredes & William E. Boyd

Data from: Combined mechanistic modelling predicts changes in species distribution and increased co-occurrence of a tropical urchin herbivore and a habitat-forming temperate kelp

Louise Castro, Paulina Cetina-Heredia, Moninya Roughan, Symon Dworjanyn, Loic Thibaut, Matthew Chamberlain, Ming Feng & Adriana Vergés
This dataset aims to identify climate change impacts on spawning and settlement of a tropical herbivore, the sea-urchin, Tripneustes gratilla, along eastern Australia and into the Tasman Sea including Lord Howe Island. The dataset contains the trajectories of particles that represent T. gratilla larvae and their dispersal by ocean currents for each day of both a contemporary (2006-2015) and future ‘business as usual’ RCP 8.5 climate change scenario (2090-2100). T. gratilla larval dispersal under both...

Coral restoration – a systematic review of current methods, successes, failures and future directions

Lisa Boström-Einarsson, Russell C. Babcock, Elisa Bayraktarov, Daniela Ceccarelli, Nathan Cook, Sebastian C. A. Ferse, Boze Hancock, Peter Harrison, Margaux Hein, Elizabeth Shaver, Adam Smith, David Suggett, Phoebe J. Stewart-Sinclair, Tali Vardi & Ian M. McLeod
Coral reef ecosystems have suffered an unprecedented loss of habitat-forming hard corals in recent decades. While marine conservation has historically focused on passive habitat protection, demand for and interest in active restoration has been growing in recent decades. However, a disconnect between coral restoration practitioners, coral reef managers and scientists has resulted in a disjointed field where it is difficult to gain an overview of existing knowledge. To address this, we aimed to synthesise the...

Data from: Fighting and mating success in giant Australian cuttlefish is influenced by behavioural lateralization

Alexandra K. Schnell, Christelle Jozet-Alves, Karina C. Hall, Léa Radday & Roger T. Hanlon
Behavioural lateralization is widespread. Yet, a fundamental question remains, how can lateralization be evolutionary stable when individuals lateralized in one direction often significantly outnumber individuals lateralized in the opposite direction? A recently developed game theory model predicts that fitness consequences that occur during intraspecific interactions may be driving population-level lateralization as an evolutionary stable strategy. This model predicts that (i) minority-type individuals exist because they are more likely to adopt unpredictable fighting behaviours during competitive...

Data from: Larval settlement: the role of surface topography for sessile coral reef invertebrates

Steve Whalan, Muhammad A. Abdul Wahab, Susanne Sprungala, Andrew J. Poole & Rocky De Nys
For sessile marine invertebrates with complex life cycles, habitat choice is directed by the larval phase. Defining which habitat-linked cues are implicated in sessile invertebrate larval settlement has largely concentrated on chemical cues which are thought to signal optimal habitat. There has been less effort establishing physical settlement cues, including the role of surface microtopography. This laboratory based study tested whether surface microtopography alone (without chemical cues) plays an important contributing role in the settlement...

Data from: Indirect effects of ocean acidification drive feeding and growth of juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci

Pamela Z. Kamya, Maria Byrne, Benjamin Mos, Lauren Hall & Symon A. Dworjanyn
The indirect effects of changing climate in modulating trophic interactions can be as important as the direct effects of climate stressors on consumers. The success of the herbivorous juvenile stage of the crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS), Acanthaster planci, may be affected by the impacts of ocean conditions on its crustose coralline algal (CCA) food. To partition the direct effects of near future ocean acidification on juvenile COTS and indirect effects through changes in their CCA food,...

Data from: Ecological opportunity and the evolution of habitat preferences in an arid-zone bird: implications for speciation in a climate-modified landscape

Janette A. Norman & Les Christidis
Bioclimatic models are widely used to investigate the impacts of climate change on species distributions. Range shifts are expected to occur as species track their current climate niche yet the potential for exploitation of new ecological opportunities that may arise as ecosystems and communities remodel is rarely considered. Here we show that grasswrens of the Amytornis textilis-modestus complex responded to new ecological opportunities in Australia’s arid biome through shifts in habitat preference following the development...

Data from: Impacts of ocean acidification on sea urchin growth across the juvenile to mature adult life-stage transition is mitigated by warming

Symon A. Dworjanyn & Maria Byrne
Understanding how growth trajectories of calcifying invertebrates are affected by changing climate requires acclimation experiments that follow development across life history transitions. In a long-term acclimation study, the effects of increased acidification and temperature on survival and growth of the tropical sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla from the early juvenile (5 mm test diameter- TD) through the developmental transition to the mature adult (60 mm TD) were investigated. Juveniles were reared in a combination of three...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    1
  • 2020
    8
  • 2019
    6
  • 2018
    4
  • 2017
    4
  • 2016
    3
  • 2015
    1
  • 2014
    2
  • 2013
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    28
  • Other
    2

Affiliations

  • Southern Cross University
    30
  • University of Sydney
    6
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • UNSW Sydney
    3
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Curtin University
    2
  • James Cook University
    2
  • Swansea University
    2
  • Islamic Azad University
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1