10 Works

Data from: The energetics of life on the deep seafloor

Craig R. McClain, Andrew P. Allen, Derek P. Tittensor & Michael A. Rex
With frigid temperatures and virtually no in situ productivity, the deep oceans, Earth’s largest ecosystem, are especially energy-deprived systems. Our knowledge of the effects of this energy limitation on all levels of biological organization is very incomplete. Here we use the Metabolic Theory of Ecology to examine the relative roles of carbon flux and temperature in influencing metabolic rate, growth rate, lifespan, body size, abundance, biomass, and biodiversity for life on the deep seafloor. We...

Data from: Increased energy promotes size-based niche availability in marine mollusks

Craig R. McClain, Taylor Gullet, Justine Jackson-Ricketts & Peter J. Unmack
Variation in chemical energy, i.e., food, availability is posited to cause variation in body size. However, examinations of the relationship are rare and primarily limited to amniotes and zooplankton. Moreover, the relationship between body size and chemical energy may be impacted by phylogenetic history, clade specific ecology, and heterogeneity of chemical energy in space and time. Considerable work remains to both document patterns in body size over gradients in food availability and understanding the processes...

Data from: Noise pollution alters ecological services: enhanced pollination and disrupted seed dispersal

Clinton D. Francis, Nathan J. Kleist, Catherine P. Ortega, Alexander Cruz, A. Cruz, N. J. Kleist, C. D. Francis & C. P. Ortega
Noise pollution is a novel, widespread environmental force that has recently been shown to alter the behavior and distribution of birds and other vertebrates, yet whether noise has cumulative, community-level consequences by changing critical ecological services is unknown. Herein, we examined the effects of noise pollution on pollination and seed dispersal and seedling establishment within a study system that isolated the effects of noise from confounding stimuli common to human-altered landscapes. Using observations, vegetation surveys...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of the Australian freshwater fish genus Galaxiella, with an emphasis on dwarf Galaxias (G. pusilla)

Peter J. Unmack, Justin C. Bagley, Mark Adams, Michael P. Hammer & Jerald B. Johnson
The freshwater fauna of Southern Australia is primarily restricted to the southwestern and southeastern corners of the continent, and is separated by a large, arid region that is inhospitable to this biota. This geographic phenomenon has attracted considerable interest from biogeographers looking to explain evolutionary diversification in this region. Here, we employed phylogenetic and phylogeographic approaches to evaluate the effect of this barrier on a group of four galaxiid fish species (Galaxiella) endemic to temperate...

Data from: The Teleost Anatomy Ontology: anatomical representation for the genomics age

Wasila M. Dahdul, John G. Lundberg, Peter E. Midford, James P. Balhoff, Hilmar Lapp, Todd J. Vision, Melissa A. Haendel, Monte Westerfield & Paula M. Mabee
The rich knowledge of morphological variation among organisms reported in the systematic literature has remained in free-text format, impractical for use in large-scale synthetic phylogenetic work. This noncomputable format has also precluded linkage to the large knowledgebase of genomic, genetic, developmental, and phenotype data in model organism databases. We have undertaken an effort to prototype a curated, ontology-based evolutionary morphology database that maps to these genetic databases (http://kb.phenoscape.org) to facilitate investigation into the mechanistic basis...

Data from: A unified anatomy ontology of the vertebrate skeletal system

Wasila M. Dahdul, James P. Balhoff, David C. Blackburn, Alexander D. Diehl, Melissa A. Haendel, Brian K. Hall, Hilmar Lapp, John G. Lundberg, Christopher J. Mungall, Martin Ringwald, Erik Segerdell, Ceri E. Van Slyke, Matthew K. Vickaryous, Monte Westerfield & Paula M. Mabee
The skeleton is of fundamental importance in research in comparative vertebrate morphology, paleontology, biomechanics, developmental biology, and systematics. Motivated by research questions that require computational access to and comparative reasoning across the diverse skeletal phenotypes of vertebrates, we developed a module of anatomical concepts for the skeletal system, the Vertebrate Skeletal Anatomy Ontology (VSAO), to accommodate and unify the existing skeletal terminologies for the species-specific (mouse, the frog Xenopus, zebrafish) and multispecies (teleost, amphibian) vertebrate...

Data from: Unraveling the determinants of insular body size shifts

Craig R. McClain, Paul A. P. Durst, Alison G. Boyer, Clinton D. Francis, P. A. P. Durst, A. G. Boyer, C. D. Francis & C. R. McClain
The island rule, a pattern of size shifts on islands, is an oft-cited but little understood phenomenon of evolutionary biology. Here we explore the evolutionary mechanisms behind the rule in 184 mammal species, testing climatic, ecological, and phylogenetic hypotheses in a robust quantitative framework. Our findings confirm the importance of species’ ecological traits in determining both the strength and the direction of body size changes on islands. Although the island rule pattern appears relatively weak...

Data from: Environmental variability and acoustic signals: A multilevel approach in songbirds

Iliana Medina, Clinton D. Francis, I. Medina & C. D. Francis
Among songbirds, growing evidence suggests that acoustic adaptation of song traits occurs in response to habitat features. Despite extensive study, most research supporting acoustic adaptation has only considered acoustic traits averaged for species or populations, overlooking intraindividual variation of song traits, which may facilitate effective communication in heterogeneous and variable environments. Fewer studies have explicitly incorporated sexual selection, which, if strong, may favour variation across environments. Here, we evaluate the prevalence of acoustic adaptation among...

Data from: Marine-freshwater transitions are associated with the evolution of dietary diversification in terapontid grunters (Teleostei: Terapontidae)

Aaron M. Davis, Peter J. Unmack, Bradley J. Pusey, Richard G. Pearson & Jerry B. Johnson
The ecological opportunities associated with transitions across the marine-freshwater interface are regarded as an important catalyst of diversification in a range of aquatic taxa. Here, we examined the role of these major habitat transitions and trophic diversification in a radiation of Australasian fishes using a new molecular phylogeny incorporating 37 Terapontidae species. A combined mitochondrial and nuclear gene analysis yielded a well supported tree with most nodes resolved. Ancestral terapontids appear to have been euryhaline...

Data from: The role of continental shelf width in determining freshwater phylogeographic patterns in southeastern Australian pygmy perches (Teleostei: Percichthyidae)

Peter J. Unmack, Michael P. Hammer, Mark Adams, Jerald B. Johnson & Thomas E. Dowling
Biogeographic patterns displayed by obligate freshwater organisms are intimately related to the nature and extent of connectivity between suitable habitats. Two of the more significant barriers to freshwater connections are seawater and major drainage divides. South-eastern Australia provides a contrast between these barriers as it has discrete areas that are likely influenced to a greater or lesser extent by each barrier type. We use continental shelf width as a proxy for the potential degree of...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    10
  • Brigham Young University
    3
  • University of South Dakota
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Oregon Health & Science University
    2
  • University of North Carolina
    2
  • University of Oregon
    2
  • South Australian Museum
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Fort Lewis College
    1