33 Works

Data from: Recombinant DNA modification of gibberellin metabolism alters growth rate and biomass allocation in Populus

Haiwei Lu, Venkatesh Viswanath, Cathleen Ma, Elizabeth Etherington, Palitha Dharmawardhana, Olga Shevchenko, Steven H. Strauss, David W. Pearce, Stewart B. Rood & Victor Busov
Overexpression of genes that modify gibberellin (GA) metabolism and signaling have been previously shown to produce trees with improved biomass production but highly disturbed development. To examine if more subtle types of genetic modification of GA could improve growth rate and modify tree architecture, we transformed a model poplar genotype (Populus tremula × P. alba) with eight genes, including two cisgenes (intact copies of native genes), four intragenes (modified copies of native genes), and two...

Data from: Combining citizen science species distribution models and stable isotopes reveals migratory connectivity in the secretive Virginia rail

Auriel M. V. Fournier, Alexis R. Sullivan, Joseph K. Bump, Marie Perkins, Mark C. Shieldcastle & Sammy L. King
Stable hydrogen isotope (δD) methods for tracking animal movement are widely used yet often produce low resolution assignments. Incorporating prior knowledge of abundance, distribution or movement patterns can ameliorate this limitation, but data are lacking for most species. We demonstrate how observations reported by citizen scientists can be used to develop robust estimates of species distributions and to constrain δD assignments. We developed a Bayesian framework to refine isotopic estimates of migrant animal origins conditional...

Data from: Separation of realized ecological niche axes among sympatric tilefishes provides insight into potential drivers of co‐occurrence in the NW Atlantic

Jill A. Olin, Oliver Shipley, Robert Cerrato, Paul Nitschke, Cedric Magen & Michael Frisk
Golden and Blueline Tilefish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps and Caulolatilus microps) are keystone taxa in northwest (NW) Atlantic continental shelf‐edge environments due to their biotic (trophic‐mediated) and abiotic (ecosystem engineering) functional roles combined with high‐value fisheries. Despite this importance, the ecological niche dynamics (i.e., those relating to trophic behavior and food‐web interactions) of these sympatric species are poorly understood, knowledge of which may be consequential for maintaining both ecosystem function and fishery sustainability. We used stable isotope...

Response and explanatory variables used in regression analysis

Jared Wolfe
The slow-paced life history of many Neotropical birds (e.g., high survival and low fecundity) is hypothesized to increase lifetime fitness through investments in self-maintenance over reproduction relative to their temperate counterparts. Molt is a key investment in self-maintenance and is readily shaped by environmental conditions. As such, variation in molt strategies may be a key mechanism underlying life-history trade-offs and adaptation to new environments. Here, we review molt strategies from a diversity of lowland Neotropical...

Avian community mist net survey data from Luba/Ureca road elevational gradient, Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

Steven Miller, Joris Wiethase, Amancio Etingue, Elaine Franklin, Maximiliano Fero, Jared Wolfe, Mary Gonder & Luke Powell
Understanding interactive effects between anthropogenic disturbance and abiotic factors on species turnover can help identify and prioritize conservation of potentially vulnerable tropical bird communities. We investigated potential factors influencing avian understory community composition along a recently constructed road across three elevations (300, 800 and 1200 m), each with two sampling sites (road edge vs interior forest), over a four-year period on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. Obligate ant following species were the most abundant guild sampled...

Body size, trophic position, and the coupling of different energy pathways across a saltmarsh landscape

Friedrich Keppeler, Jill Olin, Paola López-Duarte, Michael Polito, Linda Hooper-Bùi, Sabrina Taylor, Nancy Rabalais, F Joel Fodrie, Brian Roberts, R Eugene Turner, Charles Martin & Olaf Jensen
Here, we listed the bulk stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) and body size measurements of organisms that were analyzed in the manuscript "Body size, trophic position, and the coupling of different energy pathways across a saltmarsh landscape", published in Limnology and Oceanography Letters. Our dataset is a compilation of samplings obtained by the Southern Louisiana marsh food webs project within the Coastal Waters Consortium (CWC) II (Lopez-Duarte et al. 2017a [https://doi.org/10.7266/N7XS5SGD], Lopez-Duarte et al....

Data from: Tropical understory herbaceous community responds more strongly to hurricane disturbance than to experimental warming

Deborah Kennard, David Matlaga, Joanne Sharpe, Clay King, Aura Alonso-Rodríguez, Sasha Reed, Molly Cavaleri & Tana Wood
The effects of climate change on tropical forests may have global consequences due to the forests’ high biodiversity and major role in the global carbon cycle. In this study, we document the effects of experimental warming on the abundance and composition of a tropical forest floor herbaceous plant community in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. This study was conducted within Tropical Responses to Altered Climate Experiment (TRACE) plots, which use infrared heaters under free-air,...

Data from: Tree genetics strongly affect forest productivity, but intraspecific diversity-productivity relationships do not

Dylan G. Fischer, Gina M. Wimp, Erika Hersch-Green, Randy K. Bangert, Carri J. LeRoy, Joseph K. Bailey, Jennifer A. Schweitzer, Clarissa Dirks, Stephen C. Hart, Gerard J. Allan & Thomas G. Whitham
Numerous studies have demonstrated biodiversity–productivity relationships in plant communities, and analogous genetic diversity–productivity studies using genotype mixtures of single species may show similar patterns. Alternatively, competing individuals among genotypes within a species are less likely to exhibit resource-use complementarity, even when they exhibit large differences in their effects on ecosystem function. In this study, we test the impact of genotype diversity and genetic identity on ecosystem function using an ecosystem-scale common garden experiment. Distinct tree...

Data from: Movements of four native Hawaiian birds across a naturally fragmented landscape

Jessie L. Knowlton, David J. Flaspohler, Eben H. Paxton, Tadashi Fukami, Christian P. Giardina, Daniel S. Gruner & Erin E. Wilson Rankin
Animals often increase their fitness by moving across space in response to temporal variation in habitat quality and resource availability, and as a result of intra and inter-specific interactions. The long-term persistence of populations and even whole species depends on the collective patterns of individual movements, yet animal movements have been poorly studied at the landscape level. We quantified movement behavior within four native species of Hawaiian forest birds in a complex lava-fragmented landscape: Hawai‛i...

Prioritizing land and life in the Great Lakes region

Valoree Gagnon

Hawaiian forest bird foraging height

Erin Wilson Rankin, Jessie Knowlton, Daniel Gruner, David Flaspohler, Christian Giardina, Devin Leopold, Anna Buckhardt, William Pitt & Tadashi Fukami
Data relevant to study on the foraging height of Hawaiian forest birds collected in kipuka along the Saddle Road, Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve.

Telemetry validated nitrogen stable isotope clocks identify ocean-to-estuarine habitat shifts in mobile organisms

Oliver Shipley, Alisa Newton, Michael Frisk, Gregory Henkes, Jake LaBelle, Merry Camhi, Michael Hyatt, Hans Walters & Jill Olin
1. Throughout their life history, many animals transition among heterogenous environments to facilitate behaviors such as reproduction, foraging, and predator avoidance. The dynamic environmental and biological conditions experienced by mobile species are integrated in the chemical composition of their tissues, providing retrospective insight into movement. 2. Here, we present a unique nitrogen stable isotope clocks (‘isotopic clocks’), which integrate tissue turnover rates, consumer stable isotope ratios, and habitat-specific isotope baselines and can be used to...

Data from: Questioning assumptions of trophic behavior in a broadly ranging marine predator guild

Oliver N. Shipley, Jill A. Olin, Mike Power, Robert M. Cerrato, Michael G. Frisk, Robert. M. Cerrato & Michael Power
We evaluated whether existing assumptions regarding the trophic ecology of a poorly-studied predator guild, northwest (NW) Atlantic skates (family: Rajidae), were supported across broad geographic scales. Four hypotheses were tested using carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope values as metrics of foraging behavior: 1) species exhibit ontogenetic shifts in habitat and thus display a shift in 13C with differential use of the continental shelf; 2) species exhibit ontogenetic prey shifts (i.e., from smaller to...

Data from: Positive relationships between association strength and phenotypic similarity characterize the assembly of mixed-species bird flocks worldwide

Hari Sridhar, Umesh Srinivasan, Robert A. Askins, Julio Cesar Canales Delgadillo, Chao-Chieh Chen, David N. Ewert, George A. Gale, Eben Goodale, Wendy K. Gram, Patrick J. Hart, Keith A. Hobson, Richard L. Hutto, Sarath W. Kotagama, Jessie L. Knowlton, Tien Ming Lee, Charles A. Munn, Somchai Nimnuan, B. Z. Nizam, Guillaume Péron, V. V. Robin, Amanda D. Rodewald, Paul G. Rodewald, Robert L. Thomson, Pranav Trivedi, Steven L. Van Wilgenburg … & Kartik Shanker
Competition theory predicts that communities at small spatial scales should consist of species more dissimilar than expected by chance. We find a strikingly different pattern in a multi-continent dataset (55 presence-absence matrices from 24 locations) on the composition of mixed-species bird flocks, important subunits of local bird communities the world over. Using null models and randomization tests followed by meta-analysis, we find the association strength of species in flocks to be strongly related to similarity...

Data from: Nutrient release from moose bioturbation in aquatic ecosystems

Joseph K. Bump, Brenda G. Bergman, Amy J. Schrank, Amy M. Marcarelli, Evan S. Kane, Anita C. Risch & Martin Schütz
While the ecological importance of bioturbation is well recognized and the prevalence of aquatic foraging by terrestrial ungulates is increasingly appreciated, research linking how terrestrial ungulates function as disturbance mechanisms via bioturbation in freshwater systems is lacking. The purpose of this study was to quantify potential nutrient pulses released from benthic sediments into the water column when moose Alces alces feed on aquatic plants. We also determined if we could experimentally mimic the benthic disturbance...

Data from: MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

V. Bala Chaudhary, Megan A. Rúa, Anita Antoninka, James D. Bever, Jeffery Cannon, Ashley Craig, Jessica Duchicela, Alicia Frame, Monique Gardes, Catherine Gehring, Michelle Ha, Miranda Hart, Jacob Hopkins, Baoming Ji, Nancy Collins Johnson, Wittaya Kaonongbua, Justine Karst, Roger T. Koide, Louis J. Lamit, James Meadow, Brook G. Milligan, John C. Moore, , Bridget Piculell, Blake Ramsby … & Jason D. Hoeksema
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: The influence of plant defensive chemicals, diet composition, and winter severity on the nutritional condition of a free-ranging, generalist herbivore

Grace L. Parikh, Jennifer Sorensen Forbey, Brecken Robb, Rolf O. Peterson, Leah M. Vucetich & John A. Vucetich
When consuming plants, herbivores must deal with both low nutritional quality from cell wall constituents and potentially toxic plant secondary metabolites, which are often inversely related. Herbivores that consume a highly nutritious, but chemically defended plant, may consume high levels of toxins that require energy for detoxification. Alternatively, herbivores may avoid consuming high levels of toxins by consuming a diverse diet that may be lower in overall nutritional quality. In this study, we assessed the...

Data from: Fine-root exploitation strategies differ in tropical old-growth and logged-over forests in Ghana

Shalom D. Addo-Danso, Cindy E. Prescott, Stephen Adu-Bredu, Akwasi Duah-Gyamfi, Sam Moore, Robert D. Guy, David I. Forrester, Kennedy Owusu-Afriyie, Peter L. Marshall, Yadvinder Malhi. & Yadvinder Malhi
Understanding the changes in root exploitation strategies during post-logging recovery is important for predicting forest productivity and carbon dynamics in tropical forests. We sampled fine (diameter < 2 mm) roots using the soil-core method to quantify fine-root biomass, and architectural and morphological traits to determine root exploitation strategies in an old-growth forest and in a 54-year-old logged-over forest influenced by similar parent material and climate. Seven root traits were considered: four associated with resource exploitation...

Data from: Aging infrastructure creates opportunities for cost-efficient restoration of aquatic ecosystem connectivity

Thomas M. Neeson, Allison T. Moody, Jesse R. O'Hanley, Matthew Diebel, Patrick J. Doran, Michael C. Ferris, Timothy Colling & Peter B. McIntyre
A hallmark of industrialization is the construction of dams for water management and roads for transportation, leading to fragmentation of aquatic ecosystems. Many nations are striving to address both maintenance backlogs and mitigation of environmental impacts as their infrastructure ages. Here, we test whether accounting for road repair needs could offer opportunities to boost conservation efficiency by piggybacking connectivity restoration projects on infrastructure maintenance. Using optimization models to align fish passage restoration sites with likely...

Data from: Examining the microclimate hypothesis in Amazonian birds: indirect tests of the ‘visual constraints’ mechanism

Cameron L. Rutt, Stephen R. Midway, Vitek Jirinec, Jared D. Wolfe & Philip C. Stouffer
Proposed mechanisms for the decline of terrestrial and understory insectivorous birds in the tropics include a related subset that together has been termed the “microclimate hypothesis.” One prediction from this hypothesis is that sensitivity to bright light environments discourages birds of the dimly lit rainforest interior from using edges, gaps, or disturbed forest. Using a hierarchical Bayesian framework and capture data across time and space, we tested this by first determining vulnerability based on differences...

Magnitude and direction of stream-forest community interactions change with time scale

Amy Marcarelli, Colden Baxter, Joseph Benjamin, Yo Miyake, Masashi Murakami, Kurt Fausch & Shigeru Nakano
Networks of direct and indirect biotic interactions underpin the complex dynamics and stability of ecological systems, yet experimental and theoretical studies often yield conflicting evidence regarding the direction (positive or negative) or magnitude of these interactions. We revisited pioneering datasets collected at the deciduous forested Horonai Stream and conducted ecosystem-level syntheses to demonstrate that the direction of direct and indirect interactions can change depending on the timescale of observation. Prior experimental studies showed that terrestrial...

Data for: Successful management of invasive rats across a fragmented landscape

Erin Rankin, Sarah Barney, Devin Leopold, Kainana Francisco, David Flaspohler, Tad Fukami, Christian Giardina, Daniel Gruner, Jessie Knowlton & William Pitt
This dataset is from the manuscript "Successful management of invasive rats across a fragmented landscape" and provides the details on snap trap and tracking card data in a broadscale rat removal effort 2011-2015 in the Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve on the Island of Hawai‘i. It describes the successful trapping efforts as well as long term tracking data, which allow us to describe patterns of habitat use of non-native vertebrate species in these naturally fragmented forests...

Seismo-acoustic Network at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

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We deployed 7 broadband seismometers and 7 infrasonic microphones at the summit of Stromboli Volcano, Italy in May 2018. Our aim was to capture tilt and very long period earthquakes in the shallow subsurface and subaerial activity: explosions and jetting.

Data from: Long-term change in the avifauna of undisturbed Amazonian rainforest: Ground-foraging birds disappear and the baseline shifts

Cameron Rutt, Philip Stouffer, Vitek Jirinec, Richard Bierregaard, Angélica Hernández-Palma, Erik Johnson, Stephen Midway, Luke Powell, Jared Wolfe & Thomas Lovejoy
How are rainforest birds faring in the Anthropocene? We use bird captures spanning >35 years from 55 sites within a vast area of intact Amazonian rainforest to reveal reduced abundance of terrestrial and near-ground insectivores in the absence of deforestation, edge effects, or other direct anthropogenic landscape change. Because undisturbed forest includes far fewer terrestrial and near-ground insectivores than it did historically, today’s fragments and second growth are more impoverished than shown by comparisons with...

Data from: Two genomic regions together cause dark abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila tenebrosa

Kelly A. Dyer, Thomas Werner & Michael J. Bray
Pigmentation is a rapidly evolving trait that is under both natural and sexual selection in many organisms. In the quinaria group of Drosophila, nearly all of the 30 species have an abdomen that is light in color with distinct markings; D. tenebrosa is the exception in that it has a completely melanic abdomen with no visible markings. In this study, we use a combination of quantitative genetic and candidate gene approaches to investigate the genetic...

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